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Search Results: 1 - 10 of 714384 matches for " A.-M. Musschoot "
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E. Brems, H. Brems, D. de Geest, Van hooger leven tot de vlag. Literatuuropvattingen in Vlaanderen 1920-1940
A.-M. Musschoot
BMGN : Low Countries Historical Review , 2002,
Abstract:
Fast Semantic Duplicate Detection Techniques in Databases  [PDF]
Ibrahim Moukouop Nguena, A.-M. O. C. Richeline
Journal of Software Engineering and Applications (JSEA) , 2017, DOI: 10.4236/jsea.2017.106029
Abstract: Semantic duplicates in databases represent today an important data quality challenge which leads to bad decisions. In large databases, we sometimes find ourselves with tens of thousands of duplicates, which necessitates an automatic deduplication. For this, it is necessary to detect duplicates, with a fairly reliable method to find as many duplicates as possible and powerful enough to run in a reasonable time. This paper proposes and compares on real data effective duplicates detection methods for automatic deduplication of files based on names, working with French texts or English texts, and the names of people or places, in Africa or in the West. After conducting a more complete classification of semantic duplicates than the usual classifications, we introduce several methods for detecting duplicates whose average complexity observed is less than O(2n). Through a simple model, we highlight a global efficacy rate, combining precision and recall. We propose a new metric distance between records, as well as rules for automatic duplicate detection. Analyses made on a database containing real data for an administration in Central Africa, and on a known standard database containing names of restaurants in the USA, have shown better results than those of known methods, with a lesser complexity.
Novel mechanisms of growth hormone regulation: growth hormone-releasing peptides and ghrelin
Lengyel, A.-M.J.;
Brazilian Journal of Medical and Biological Research , 2006, DOI: 10.1590/S0100-879X2006000800002
Abstract: growth hormone secretion is classically modulated by two hypothalamic hormones, growth hormone-releasing hormone and somatostatin. a third pathway was proposed in the last decade, which involves the growth hormone secretagogues. ghrelin is a novel acylated peptide which is produced mainly by the stomach. it is also synthesized in the hypothalamus and is present in several other tissues. this endogenous growth hormone secretagogue was discovered by reverse pharmacology when a group of synthetic growth hormone-releasing compounds was initially produced, leading to the isolation of an orphan receptor and, finally, to its endogenous ligand. ghrelin binds to an active receptor to increase growth hormone release and food intake. it is still not known how hypothalamic and circulating ghrelin is involved in the control of growth hormone release. endogenous ghrelin might act to amplify the basic pattern of growth hormone secretion, optimizing somatotroph responsiveness to growth hormone-releasing hormone. it may activate multiple interdependent intracellular pathways at the somatotroph, involving protein kinase c, protein kinase a and extracellular calcium systems. however, since ghrelin has a greater ability to release growth hormone in vivo, its main site of action is the hypothalamus. in the current review we summarize the available data on the: a) discovery of this peptide, b) mechanisms of action of growth hormone secretagogues and ghrelin and possible physiological role on growth hormone modulation, and c) regulation of growth hormone release in man after intravenous administration of these peptides.
The development of moral judgement during childhood and pre-adolescent in the Romanian setting
Cocorad?, E.,Cazan, A.-M.
Bulletin of the Transilvania University of Bra?ov. Series VII : Social Sciences and Law , 2011,
Abstract: The moral development is a classical topic, but still insufficiently investigated in the recent studies in Romania. Our study aimed to compare the results obtained by Piaget regarding the child’s moral development with the child’s moral development corresponding to the recent cultural Romanian setting. The research method is mixed, qualitative and quantitative. The clinical interview and the short stories were designed after Piaget’s model. Our findings suggest the existence of the same clasical stages of moral development, but identify numerous mixed profiles that highlight the oscillations of the moral judgments for amoral children and submissive pre-adolescences.
Dropout of adult learners returning to university: interactions of motivational and environmental factors
Jacot, A.,Frenay, M.,Cazan, A.-M.
Bulletin of the Transilvania University of Bra?ov. Series VII : Social Sciences and Law , 2010,
Abstract: The purpose of this paper is to highlight how motivational and contextual factors interact together to explain the dropout process of adult learners returning to university. From seventeen semi-structured interviews, four main interactions have been identified between entry motives, dimensions of perceived value and expectancy, life and learning contexts. The findings from this study indicated that studying dropout of adult learners with motivational factors enables a deeper understanding taking into account the different commitments of this population and the motivational dynamic.
Number size distributions and seasonality of submicron particles in Europe 2008–2009
A. Asmi,A. Wiedensohler,P. Laj,A.-M. Fjaeraa
Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics (ACP) & Discussions (ACPD) , 2011, DOI: 10.5194/acp-11-5505-2011
Abstract: Two years of harmonized aerosol number size distribution data from 24 European field monitoring sites have been analysed. The results give a comprehensive overview of the European near surface aerosol particle number concentrations and number size distributions between 30 and 500 nm of dry particle diameter. Spatial and temporal distribution of aerosols in the particle sizes most important for climate applications are presented. We also analyse the annual, weekly and diurnal cycles of the aerosol number concentrations, provide log-normal fitting parameters for median number size distributions, and give guidance notes for data users. Emphasis is placed on the usability of results within the aerosol modelling community. We also show that the aerosol number concentrations of Aitken and accumulation mode particles (with 100 nm dry diameter as a cut-off between modes) are related, although there is significant variation in the ratios of the modal number concentrations. Different aerosol and station types are distinguished from this data and this methodology has potential for further categorization of stations aerosol number size distribution types. The European submicron aerosol was divided into characteristic types: Central European aerosol, characterized by single mode median size distributions, unimodal number concentration histograms and low variability in CCN-sized aerosol number concentrations; Nordic aerosol with low number concentrations, although showing pronounced seasonal variation of especially Aitken mode particles; Mountain sites (altitude over 1000 m a.s.l.) with a strong seasonal cycle in aerosol number concentrations, high variability, and very low median number concentrations. Southern and Western European regions had fewer stations, which decreases the regional coverage of these results. Aerosol number concentrations over the Britain and Ireland had very high variance and there are indications of mixed air masses from several source regions; the Mediterranean aerosol exhibit high seasonality, and a strong accumulation mode in the summer. The greatest concentrations were observed at the Ispra station in Northern Italy with high accumulation mode number concentrations in the winter. The aerosol number concentrations at the Arctic station Zeppelin in Ny-AA lesund in Svalbard have also a strong seasonal cycle, with greater concentrations of accumulation mode particles in winter, and dominating summer Aitken mode indicating more recently formed particles. Observed particles did not show any statistically significant regional work-week or weekda
DNA damage by ochratoxin A in rat kidney assessed by the alkaline comet assay
Zeljezic, D.;Domijan, A.-M.;Peraica, M.;
Brazilian Journal of Medical and Biological Research , 2006, DOI: 10.1590/S0100-879X2006005000029
Abstract: there are few studies of ochratoxin a (ota) genotoxicity in experimental animals and the results obtained with cell cultures are inconsistent, although the carcinogenic potential of ota for the kidney of experimental animals has been well established. we studied the genotoxic potential of ota in the kidney of adult female wistar rats (5 in each group) treated intraperitoneally with ota (0.5 mg kg body weight-1 day-1 for 7, 14, and 21 days) measuring dna mobility on agarose gel stained with ethidium-bromide using standard alkaline single-cell gel electrophoresis (comet assay). negative control animals were treated with solvent (tris buffer, 1.0 mg/kg) and positive control animals were treated with methyl methanesulfonate (40 mg/kg) according to the same schedule. ota concentrations in plasma and kidney homogenates in 7-, 14-, and 21-day treated animals were 4.86 ± 0.53, 7.52 ± 3.32, 7.85 ± 2.24 μg/ml, and 0.87 ± 0.09, 0.99 ± 0.06, 1.09 ± 0.15 μg/g, respectively. in all ota-treated groups, the tail length, tail intensity, and tail moment in kidney tissue were significantly higher than in controls (p < 0.05). the tail length and tail moment were higher after 14 days than after 7 days of treatment (p < 0.05), and still higher after 21 days (p < 0.05). the highest tail intensity was observed in animals treated for 21 days, and it differed significantly from animals treated for 7 and 14 days (p < 0.05). ota concentrations in plasma and kidney tissue increased steadily and ota concentration in kidney tissue strongly correlated with tail intensity and tail moment values. these results confirm the genotoxic potential of ota, and show that the severity of dna lesions in kidney correlates with ota concentration.
Autonomous distributed temperature sensing for long-term heated applications in remote areas
A.-M. Kurth, N. Dawes, J. Selker,M. Schirmer
Geoscientific Instrumentation, Methods and Data Systems (GI) & Discussions (GID) , 2013, DOI: 10.5194/gi-2-71-2013
Abstract: Distributed temperature sensing (DTS) is a fiber-optical method enabling simultaneous temperature measurements over long distances. Electrical resistance heating of the metallic components of the fiber-optic cable provides information on the thermal characteristics of the cable's environment, providing valuable insight into processes occurring in the surrounding medium, such as groundwater–surface water interactions, dam stability or soil moisture. Until now, heated applications required direct handling of the DTS instrument by a researcher, rendering long-term investigations in remote areas impractical due to the often difficult and time-consuming access to the field site. Remote control and automation of the DTS instrument and heating processes, however, resolve the issue with difficult access. The data can also be remotely accessed and stored on a central database. The power supply can be grid independent, although significant infrastructure investment is required here due to high power consumption during heated applications. Solar energy must be sufficient even in worst case scenarios, e.g. during long periods of intense cloud cover, to prevent system failure due to energy shortage. In combination with storage batteries and a low heating frequency, e.g. once per day or once per week (depending on the season and the solar radiation on site), issues of high power consumption may be resolved. Safety regulations dictate adequate shielding and ground-fault protection, to safeguard animals and humans from electricity and laser sources. In this paper the autonomous DTS system is presented to allow research with heated applications of DTS in remote areas for long-term investigations of temperature distributions in the environment.
Autonomous distributed temperature sensing for long-term heated applications in remote areas
A.-M. Kurth,N. Dawes,J. Selker,M. Schirmer
Geoscientific Instrumentation, Methods and Data Systems Discussions , 2012, DOI: 10.5194/gid-2-855-2012
Abstract: Distributed Temperature Sensing (DTS) is a fiber-optical method enabling simultaneous temperature measurements over long distances. Electrical resistance heating of the metallic components of the fiber-optic cable provides information on the thermal characteristics of the cable's environment, providing valuable insight into processes occurring in the surrounding medium, such as groundwater-surface water interactions, dam stability or soil moisture. Until now, heated applications required direct handling of the DTS instrument by a researcher, rendering long-term investigations in remote areas impractical due to the often difficult and time-consuming access to the field site. Remote-control and automation of the DTS instrument and heating processes, however, resolve the issue with difficult access. The data can also be remotely accessed and stored on a central database. The power supply can be grid-independent, although significant infrastructure investment is required here due to high power consumption during heated applications. Solar energy must be sufficient even in worst case scenarios, e.g. during long periods of intense cloud cover, to prevent system failure due to energy shortage. In combination with storage batteries and a low heating frequency, e.g. once per day or once per week (depending on the season and the solar radiation on site), issues of high power consumption may be resolved. Safety regulations dictate adequate shielding and ground-fault protection, to safeguard animals and humans from electricity and laser sources. In this paper the autonomous DTS system is presented to allow research with heated applications of DTS in remote areas for long-term investigations of temperature distributions in the environment.
Urban agriculture: multi-dimensional tools for social development in poor neibourghoods
E. Duchemin, F. Wegmuller,A.-M. Legault
Field Actions Science Reports (FACTS) , 2009, DOI: 10.5194/facts-2-1-2009
Abstract: For over 30 years, different urban agriculture (UA) experiments have been undertaken in Montreal (Quebec, Canada). The Community Gardening Program, managed by the City, and 6 collective gardens, managed by community organizations, are discussed in this article. These experiments have different objectives, including food security, socialization and education. Although these have changed over time, they have also differed depending on geographic location (neighbourhood). The UA initiatives in Montreal have resulted in the development of a centre with a significant vegetable production and a socialization and education environment that fosters individual and collective social development in districts with a significant economically disadvantaged population. The various approaches attain the established objectives and these are multi-dimensional tools used for the social development of disadvantaged populations.
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