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Search Results: 1 - 10 of 672897 matches for " A. S. Vashi "
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Ethanolamines as Corrosion Inhibitors for Zinc in (HNO3+H2SO4) Binary Acid Mixture
R. T. Vashi,H. M. Bhajiwala,S. A. Desai
Journal of Chemistry , 2010, DOI: 10.1155/2010/518543
Abstract:
Multi-Objective Optimization of Two-Stage Helical Gear Train Using NSGA-II
R. C. Sanghvi,A. S. Vashi,H. P. Patolia,R. G. Jivani
Journal of Optimization , 2014, DOI: 10.1155/2014/670297
Abstract: Gears not only transmit the motion and power satisfactorily but also can do so with uniform motion. The design of gears requires an iterative approach to optimize the design parameters that take care of kinematics aspects as well as strength aspects. Moreover, the choice of materials available for gears is limited. Owing to the complex combinations of the above facts, manual design of gears is complicated and time consuming. In this paper, the volume and load carrying capacity are optimized. Three different methodologies (i) MATLAB optimization toolbox, (ii) genetic algorithm (GA), and (iii) multiobjective optimization (NSGA-II) technique are used to solve the problem. In the first two methods, volume is minimized in the first step and then the load carrying capacities of both shafts are calculated. In the third method, the problem is treated as a multiobjective problem. For the optimization purpose, face width, module, and number of teeth are taken as design variables. Constraints are imposed on bending strength, surface fatigue strength, and interference. It is apparent from the comparison of results that the result obtained by NSGA-II is more superior than the results obtained by other methods in terms of both objectives. 1. Introduction Designing a new product consists of several parameters and phases, which differ according to the depth of design, input data, design strategy, procedures, and results. Mechanical design includes an optimization process in which designers always consider certain objectives such as strength, deflection, weight, wear, and corrosion depending on the requirements. However, design optimization for a complete mechanical assembly leads to a complicated objective function with a large number of design variables. So it is a better practice to apply optimization techniques for individual components or intermediate assemblies than a complete assembly. For example, in an automobile power transmission system, optimization of gearbox is computationally and mathematically simpler than the optimization of complete system. The preliminary design optimization of two-stage helical gear train has been a subject of considerable interest, since many high-performance power transmission applications require high-performance gear train. A traditional gear design involves computations based on tooth bending strength, tooth surface durability, tooth surface fatigue, interference, efficiency, and so forth. Gear design involves empirical formulas, different graphs and tables, which lead to a complicated design. Manual design is very difficult
Synthesis, Characterization and Antifungal Activity of Novel Quinazolin-4-one Derivatives Containing 8-Hydroxyquinazoline Ligand and its Various Metal Complexes
R. T. Vashi,S. B. Patel
Journal of Chemistry , 2009, DOI: 10.1155/2009/624150
Abstract:
Impact of oral vitamin D supplementation on serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels in oncology
Pankaj G Vashi, Kristen Trukova, Carolyn A Lammersfeld, Donald P Braun, Digant Gupta
Nutrition Journal , 2010, DOI: 10.1186/1475-2891-9-60
Abstract: This is a retrospective observational study of 2198 cancer patients who had a baseline test prior to initiation of cancer therapy at our hospital to evaluate serum 25(OH)D levels between Jan 08 and Dec 09 as part of their initial nutritional evaluation. Patients with baseline levels of < = 32 ng/ml (n = 1651) were considered to have suboptimal serum 25(OH)D levels and were supplemented with 8000 IU of Vitamin D3 (four 2000 IU D3 capsules) daily as part of their nutritional care plan. The patients were retested at their first follow-up visit. Of 1651 patients, 799 were available for follow up assessment. The mean serum 25(OH)D levels were compared in these 799 patients across the 2 time points (baseline and first follow-up) using paired sample t-test. We also investigated the factors associated with response to vitamin D supplementation.Of 2198 patients, 814 were males and 1384 females. 1051 were newly diagnosed and treated at our hospital while 1147 were diagnosed and treated elsewhere. The mean age at presentation was 55.4 years. The most common cancer types were breast (500, 22.7%), lung (328, 14.9%), pancreas (214, 9.7%), colorectal (204, 9.3%) and prostate (185, 8.4%). The mean time duration between baseline and first follow-up assessment was 14.7 weeks (median 10.9 weeks and range 4 weeks to 97.1 weeks). The mean serum 25(OH)D levels were 19.1 ng/ml (SD = 7.5) and 36.2 ng/ml (SD = 17.1) at baseline and first follow-up respectively; p < 0.001. Patients with prostate and lung cancer had the highest percentage of responders (70% and 69.2% respectively) while those with colorectal and pancreas had the lowest (46.7% each). Similarly, patients with serum levels 20-32 ng/ml at baseline were most likely to attain levels > 32 ng/ml compared to patients with baseline levels < 20 ng/ml.The response to supplementation from suboptimal to optimal levels was greatest in patients with prostate and lung cancer as well as those with baseline levels between 20-32 ng/ml. Character
Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D is inversely associated with body mass index in cancer
Pankaj G Vashi, Carolyn A Lammersfeld, Donald P Braun, Digant Gupta
Nutrition Journal , 2011, DOI: 10.1186/1475-2891-10-51
Abstract: A consecutive case series of 738 cancer patients. Serum 25(OH)D was measured at presentation to the hospital. The cohort was divided into 4 BMI groups (underweight: <18.5, normal weight: 18.5-24.9, overweight: 25-29.9, and obese: >30.0 kg/m2). Mean 25(OH)D was compared across the 4 BMI groups using ANOVA. Linear regression was used to quantify the relationship between BMI and 25(OH)D.303 were males and 435 females. Mean age at diagnosis was 55.6 years. The mean BMI was 27.9 kg/m2 and mean serum 25(OH)D was 21.9 ng/ml. Most common cancers were lung (134), breast (131), colorectal (97), pancreas (86) and prostate (45). Obese patients had significantly lower serum 25(OH)D levels (17.9 ng/ml) as compared to normal weight (24.6 ng/ml) and overweight (22.8 ng/ml) patients; p < 0.001. After adjusting for age, every 1 kg/m2 increase in BMI was significantly associated with 0.42 ng/ml decline in serum 25(OH)D levels.Obese cancer patients (BMI >= 30 kg/m2) had significantly lower levels of serum 25(OH)D as compared to non-obese patients (BMI <30 kg/m2). BMI should be taken into account when assessing a patient's vitamin D status and more aggressive vitamin D supplementation should be considered in obese cancer patients.Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] is the major circulating form of vitamin D and a standard indicator of vitamin D status [1,2]. Several studies have described an inverse relationship between serum 25(OH)D and cancer risk [3-5]. The relationship between regular vitamin D intake and reduced cancer incidence has also been reported [6]. Furthermore, higher plasma 25(OH)D levels are associated with improved survival in prostate [7], breast [8], lung [9], colorectal [10] and ovarian [11] cancers. A better vitamin D status at the time of diagnosis and treatment, adjusted for season of diagnosis, has been shown to improve survival [12,13].Several factors are involved in the regulation of 25(OH)D including: age; gender [14]; race [15]; dietary intake [2]; season [16]
Role of nutritional status in predicting quality of life outcomes in cancer – a systematic review of the epidemiological literature
Christopher G Lis, Digant Gupta, Carolyn A Lammersfeld, Maurie Markman, Pankaj G Vashi
Nutrition Journal , 2012, DOI: 10.1186/1475-2891-11-27
Abstract:
Longitudinal monitoring of CA125 levels provides additional information about survival in ovarian cancer
Digant Gupta, Carolyn A Lammersfeld, Pankaj G Vashi, Donald P Braun
Journal of Ovarian Research , 2010, DOI: 10.1186/1757-2215-3-22
Abstract: A case series of 170 ovarian cancer patients treated at Cancer Treatment Centers of America. Based on CA125 levels at baseline and 3 months, patients were classified into 4 groups: 1) Normal (0-35 U/ml) at baseline and three months; 2) High (>35 U/ml) at baseline, normal at three months; 3) Normal at baseline, high at 3 months; 4) High at baseline and three months. Kaplan Meier method was used to calculate survival across the 4 categories.Of 170 patients, 36 were newly diagnosed while 134 had received prior treatment. 25 had stage I disease at diagnosis, 15 stage II, 106 stage III and 14 stage IV. The median age at presentation was 54.2 years (range 23.1 - 82.5 years). At baseline, 31 patients had normal (0-35 U/ml) serum CA125 levels while 139 had high (>35 U/ml) levels. At 3 months, 59 had normal while 111 had high levels. Patients with a reduced CA125 at 3 months had a significantly better survival than those with increased CA125 at 3 months. Patients with normal values of CA125 at both baseline and 3 months had the best overall survival.These data show that reduction in CA125 after 3 months of therapy is associated with better overall survival in ovarian cancer. Patients without a significant decline in CA125 after 3 months of therapy have a particularly poor prognosis.Ovarian cancer is the second most common gynecologic malignancy in the United States, with approximately 22,200 new cases each year [1]. It is also the leading cause of death from gynecologic cancers in the United States [2]. The overall lifetime risk of developing ovarian cancer for women in the United States is 1.4% to 1.8%. This risk varies from 0.6% for women with no family history, at least three term pregnancies, and four or more years of oral contraceptive use, to 3.4% for nulliparous women with no oral contraceptive use. For women with a family history, the lifetime risk for ovarian cancer is estimated at 9.4% [3].Ovarian cancer is often asymptomatic in its early stages and thus most patie
Can subjective global assessment of nutritional status predict survival in ovarian cancer?
Digant Gupta, Carolyn A Lammersfeld, Pankaj G Vashi, Sadie L Dahlk, Christopher G Lis
Journal of Ovarian Research , 2008, DOI: 10.1186/1757-2215-1-5
Abstract: We evaluated a case series of 132 ovarian cancer patients treated at Cancer Treatment Centers of America? from Jan 2001 to May 2006. SGA was used to assess nutritional status at baseline. Using SGA, patients were classified as well nourished (SGA A), moderately malnourished (SGA B) or severely malnourished (SGA C). Kaplan Meier method was used to calculate survival. Cox proportional hazard models were constructed to evaluate the prognostic effect of SGA independent of other factors.Of 132 patients, 24 were newly diagnosed while 108 had received prior treatment. 15 had stage I disease at diagnosis, 8 stage II, 85 stage III and 17 stage IV. The median age at presentation was 54.4 years (range 25.5 – 82.5 years). 66 patients were well-nourished (SGA A), 35 moderately malnourished (SGA B) and 31 severely malnourished (SGA C). Well nourished patients had a median survival of 19.3 months (95% CI: 14.1 to 24.5), moderately malnourished 15.5 months (95% CI: 5.8 to 25.1), and severely malnourished 6.7 months (95% CI: 4.1 to 9.3); the difference being statistically significant (p = 0.0003). Multivariate Cox modeling, after adjusting for stage at diagnosis and prior treatment history found that moderately malnourished and severely malnourished status were associated with a relative risk of 2.1 (95% CI: 1.2 to 3.6, p = 0.008) and 3.4 (95% CI: 1.9 to 5.8, p < 0.001) respectively as compared to well nourished status.Univariate and multivariate survival analyses found that low SGA scores (i.e. well-nourished status) are associated with better survival outcomes. This study lends support to the role of aggressive nutritional intervention in improving patient outcomes in cancer care.The overall age-adjusted incidence rate for all ovarian cancer cases as reported by the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Program of the National Cancer Institute is 16.23 cases per 100,000 women standardized to the 2000 United States standard population [1]. Ovarian cancer is the fifth l
Bioelectrical impedance phase angle in clinical practice: implications for prognosis in stage IIIB and IV non-small cell lung cancer
Digant Gupta, Carolyn A Lammersfeld, Pankaj G Vashi, Jessica King, Sadie L Dahlk, James F Grutsch, Christopher G Lis
BMC Cancer , 2009, DOI: 10.1186/1471-2407-9-37
Abstract: A case series of 165 stages IIIB and IV NSCLC patients treated at our center. The Kaplan Meier method was used to calculate survival. Cox proportional hazard models were constructed to evaluate the prognostic effect of phase angle, independent of stage at diagnosis and prior treatment history.93 were males and 72 females. 61 had stage IIIB disease at diagnosis while 104 had stage IV. The median phase angle was 5.3 degrees (range = 2.9 – 8). Patients with phase angle <= 5.3 had a median survival of 7.6 months (95% CI: 4.7 to 9.5; n = 81), while those with > 5.3 had 12.4 months (95% CI: 10.5 to 18.7; n = 84); (p = 0.02). After adjusting for age, stage at diagnosis and prior treatment history we found that every one degree increase in phase angle was associated with a relative risk of 0.79 (95% CI: 0.64 to 0.97, P = 0.02).We found BIA-derived phase angle to be an independent prognostic indicator in patients with stage IIIB and IV NSCLC. Nutritional interventions targeted at improving phase angle could potentially lead to an improved survival in patients with advanced NSCLC.Worldwide, lung cancer is the most common form of cancer, with an incidence of 1.35 million new cases per year, and 1.18 million deaths, with the highest rates in Europe and North America. Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) accounts for about 80% of all lung cancers [1].Malnutrition is a frequent manifestation in patients with advanced NSCLC and is a major contributor to morbidity and mortality [2]. Malnutrition is characterized by changes in cellular membrane integrity and alterations in fluid balance [3]. As a result, measurement of body composition is an important component of overall nutritional evaluation in cancer patients [4-6].Historically, nutritional status has been evaluated by various objective measures, including anthropometric (e.g. weight change, arm muscle circumference, triceps skinfold thickness) and laboratory (serum albumin, transferrin assays and nitrogen balance studies) measure
Bioelectrical impedance phase angle as a prognostic indicator in breast cancer
Digant Gupta, Carolyn A Lammersfeld, Pankaj G Vashi, Jessica King, Sadie L Dahlk, James F Grutsch, Christopher G Lis
BMC Cancer , 2008, DOI: 10.1186/1471-2407-8-249
Abstract: We evaluated a case series of 259 histologically confirmed breast cancer patients treated at Cancer Treatment Centers of America. Kaplan Meier method was used to calculate survival. Cox proportional hazard models were constructed to evaluate the prognostic effect of phase angle independent of stage at diagnosis and prior treatment history. Survival was calculated as the time interval between the date of first patient visit to the hospital and the date of death from any cause or date of last contact/last known to be alive.Of 259 patients, 81 were newly diagnosed at our hospital while 178 had received prior treatment elsewhere. 56 had stage I disease at diagnosis, 110 had stage II, 46 had stage III and 34 had stage IV. The median age at diagnosis was 49 years (range 25 – 74 years). The median phase angle score was 5.6 (range = 1.5 – 8.9). Patients with phase angle <= 5.6 had a median survival of 23.1 months (95% CI: 14.2 to 31.9; n = 129), while those > 5.6 had 49.9 months (95% CI: 35.6 to 77.8; n = 130); the difference being statistically significant (p = 0.031). Multivariate Cox modeling, after adjusting for stage at diagnosis and prior treatment history found that every one unit increase in phase angle score was associated with a relative risk of 0.82 (95% CI: 0.68 to 0.99, P = 0.041). Stage at diagnosis (p = 0.006) and prior treatment history (p = 0.001) were also predictive of survival independent of each other and phase angle.This study demonstrates that BIA-derived phase angle is an independent prognostic indicator in patients with breast cancer. Nutritional interventions targeted at improving phase angle could potentially lead to an improved survival in patients with breast cancer.In the United States, breast cancer is the most common non-skin cancer and the second leading cause of cancer-related death in women [1].Malnutrition is a frequent manifestation in patients with advanced cancer and is a major contributor to morbidity and mortality [2]. Malnutrition i
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