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Search Results: 1 - 10 of 461994 matches for " A. Rubbia "
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Future liquid Argon detectors
Rubbia, A.
High Energy Physics - Phenomenology , 2013,
Abstract: The Liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber offers an innovative technology for a new class of massive detectors for rare-event detection. It is a precise tracking device that allows three-dimensional spatial reconstruction with mm-scale precision of the morphology of ionizing tracks with the imaging quality of a "bubble chamber", provides $dE/dx$ information with high sampling rate, and acts as high-resolution calorimeter for contained events. First proposed in 1977 and after a long maturing process, its holds today the potentialities of opening new physics opportunities by providing excellent tracking and calorimetry performance at the relevant multi-kton mass scales, outperforming other techniques. In this paper, we review future liquid argon detectors presently being discussed by the neutrino physics community.
Future liquid Argon detectors
A. Rubbia
Physics , 2013, DOI: 10.1016/j.nuclphysbps.2013.04.010
Abstract: The Liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber offers an innovative technology for a new class of massive detectors for rare-event detection. It is a precise tracking device that allows three-dimensional spatial reconstruction with mm-scale precision of the morphology of ionizing tracks with the imaging quality of a "bubble chamber", provides $dE/dx$ information with high sampling rate, and acts as high-resolution calorimeter for contained events. First proposed in 1977 and after a long maturing process, its holds today the potentialities of opening new physics opportunities by providing excellent tracking and calorimetry performance at the relevant multi-kton mass scales, outperforming other techniques. In this paper, we review future liquid argon detectors presently being discussed by the neutrino physics community.
The ArDM project: a Liquid Argon TPC for Dark Matter Detection
Laffranchi, M.;Rubbia, A.
High Energy Physics - Phenomenology , 2007, DOI: 10.1088/1742-6596/65/1/012014
Abstract: WIMPs (Weakly Interacting Massive Particles) are considered the main candidates for Cold Dark Matter. The ArDM experiment aims at measuring signals directly induced by WIMPs in liquid argon. A 1-ton prototype is currently developed with the goal of demonstrating the feasibility and performance of a detector with such a large target mass. ArDM aims at acting as a liquid argon TPC and additionally measuring the scintillation light. The principle of the experiment and the conceptual design of the detector are described.
Constraining axion by polarized prompt emission from gamma ray bursts
Rubbia, A.;Sakharov, A. S.
High Energy Physics - Phenomenology , 2007, DOI: 10.1016/j.astropartphys.2007.11.003
Abstract: A polarized gamma ray emission spread over a sufficiently wide energy band from a strongly magnetized astrophysical object like gamma ray bursts (GRBs) offers an opportunity to test the hypothesis of invisible axion. The axionic induced dichroism of gamma rays at different energies should cause a misalignment of the polarization plane for higher energy events relative to that one for lower energies events resulting in the loss of statistics needed to form a pattern of the polarization signal to be recognized in a detector. According to this, any evidence of polarized gamma rays coming from an object with extended magnetic field could be interpreted as a constraint on the existence of the invisible axion for a certain parameter range. Based on reports of polarized MeV emission detected in several GRBs we derive a constraint on the axion-photon coupling. This constraint $\g_{a\gamma\gamma}\le 2.2\cdot 10^{-11} {\rm GeV^{-1}}$ calculated for the axion mass $m_a=10^{-3} {\rm eV}$ is competitive with the sensitivity of CAST and becomes even stronger for lower masses.
Long baseline neutrino oscillation disappearance search using a $ν$ beam from muon decays
A. Bueno,M. Campanelli,A. Rubbia
Physics , 1998,
Abstract: We study the feasibility of performing a $\nu_\mu$ disappearance long-baseline experiment using a neutrino beam coming from muon decays. The advantage of such a technique with respect to the production of neutrino beams from pions is that in a muon decay both muon and electron neutrinos are produced in the same quantity. In case of $\nu_\mu\to\nu_{\tau,s}$ oscillations, the $\nu_e$ charged current (CC) events can be used as a control sample, to predict in situ the $\nu_\mu$ rates, thus reducing the systematics due to the knowledge of the neutrino flux, which is the main source of uncertainties for disappearance experiments. We consider as our neutrino target, the ICARUS detector in its final mass configuration of 4.8 kton.
Physics potential at a neutrino factory: can we benefit from more than just detecting muons?
A. Bueno,M. Campanelli,A. Rubbia
Physics , 2000, DOI: 10.1016/S0550-3213(00)00539-3
Abstract: In order to fully address the oscillation processes at a neutrino factory, a detector should be capable of identifying and measuring all three charged lepton flavors produced in charged current interactions {\it and} of measuring their charges to discriminate the incoming neutrino helicity. This is an experimentally challenging task, given the required detector mass for long-baseline experiments. We address the benefit of a high-granularity, excellent-calorimetry non-magnetized target-detector, which provides a background-free identification of electron neutrino charged current and a kinematical selection of tau neutrino charged current interactions. We assume that charge discrimination is only available for muons reaching an external magnetized-Fe spectrometer. This allows the clean classification of events into electron, right-sign muon, wrong-sign muon and no-lepton categories. In addition, high granularity permits a clean detection of quasi-elastic events, which by detecting the final state proton, provide a selection of the neutrino electron helicity without the need of an electron charge measurement. From quantitative analyses of neutrino oscillation scenarios, we conclude that in many cases the discovery sensitivities and the measurements of the oscillation parameters are dominated by the ability to measure the muon charge. However, we identify cases where identification of electron and tau samples contributes significantly.
Three-family oscillations using neutrinos from muon beams at very long baseline
M. Campanelli,A. Bueno,A. Rubbia
Physics , 1999,
Abstract: The planned LBL experiments will be able to prove the hypothesis of flavor oscillation between muon and tau neutrinos. We explore the possibility of a second generation long baseline experiment at very long baseline, i.e. L in the range 5000-7000 km. This distance requires intense neutrino beams that could be available from very intense muon beams as those needed for $\mu$ colliders. Such baselines allow the study of neutrino oscillations with $E/L \approx 2\times 10^{-3} eV^2$ with neutrinos of energy $E_\nu \approx 10 GeV$, i.e. above tau threshold. Moreover, matter effects inside the Earth could lead to observable effects in $\nu_e \to \nu_\mu$ oscillations. These effects are interchanged between neutrinos and antineutrinos, and therefore they can be tested by comparing the oscillated spectra obtained running the storage ring with positive and negative muons.
A medium baseline search for $ν_μ\toν_e$ oscillations at a $ν$ beam from muon decays
A. Bueno,M. Campanelli,A. Rubbia
Physics , 1998,
Abstract: The accurate knowledge of the $\bar\nu_e (\nu_\mu)$ beam produced in $\mu^-$ decays and the absence of $\nu_e (\bar\nu_\mu)$ contamination, make a future muon storage ring the ideal place to look for $\numunue$ ($\numubarnuebar$) oscillations. Using a detector capable of electron and muon identification with charge discrimination (e.g., the presently running NOMAD experiment), good sensitivities to $\numunue (\numubarnuebar)$ oscillations could be achieved. With the CERN-PS as a proton driver for a muon storage ring of the kind envisaged for a $\mu$-collider, the LSND claim would be confirmed or disproved in a few years of running.
Development of a novel high-sensivitiy LAr purity monitor based on an $α$-source
A. Badertscher,M. Laffranchi,A. Rubbia
Physics , 2004,
Abstract: A novel liquid argon (LAr) purity monitor was developed with a sensitivity to electronegative impurities of the order of ppb (O$_2$ equivalent). Such a high purity is e.g. needed in a LAr drift chamber. The principle is to measure the lifetime of quasifree electrons in LAr, since this is the important parameter for the operation of a drift chamber. Free electrons are produced by ionizing the LAr with $\alpha$-particles emitted by the $^{210}Po$ chain daughter of an isotope $^{210}Pb$ source. From a measurement of the charge of the electron cloud at the beginning and at the end of a drift path, together with the drift time, the lifetime of the electrons is obtained. The $\alpha$-particles have a very short range of about 50 \mu$m in LAr and the ionization density is very high, typically between $750\div 1500\rm MeV/cm$, leading to a high recombination rate. To suppress the recombination of the argon ions with the electrons, the $\alpha$-source was put in a strong electric field of $40\div 150$ kV/cm. This was achieved by depositing the source on the surface of a spherical high voltage cathode with a diameter of about 0.5 mm. The anode was also made as a sphere of about the same diameter as the cathode, thus, close to the axis between the two electrodes the electric drift field was approximately a dipole field.
Summary of the 3rd International Workshop on a Far Detector in Korea for the J-PARC Beam
Kajita, T.;Kim, S. B.;Rubbia, A.
High Energy Physics - Phenomenology , 2008,
Abstract: The 3rd International Workshop on a Far Detector in Korea for the J-PARC Neutrino Beam was held at the Hongo Campus of Tokyo University, Tokyo, Japan on Sep. 30th and October 1, 2007. Forty seven physicists from Japan and Korea, as well as Europe and USA, participated in the workshop and discussed the physics opportunities offered by the J-PARC conventional neutrino beam detected by a new large underground neutrino detector in Korea. In this paper, we highlight some of the most relevant findings of the workshop.
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