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Search Results: 1 - 10 of 715174 matches for " A. M. Fox "
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Supporting the advancement of science: Open access publishing and the role of mandates
Lisa Phelps, Bernard A Fox, Francesco M Marincola
Journal of Translational Medicine , 2012, DOI: 10.1186/1479-5876-10-13
Abstract: Journal of Translational Medicine is an open access journal published by BioMed Central that aims to optimise communication between basic and clinical science. Now in its 10th year of publication the journal is successful in its aim for fostering communication from bench to bedside.A new bill, the Research Works Act [1], has been introduced in the United States House of Representatives threatening the public's access to US government funded research and the foundation on which Journal of Translational Medicine was built. The bill states:"No Federal agency may adopt, implement, maintain, continue, or otherwise engage in any policy, program, or other activity that:(1) causes, permits, or authorizes network dissemination of any private-sector research work without the prior consent of the publisher of such work; or(2) requires that any actual or prospective author, or the employer of such an actual or prospective author, assent to network dissemination of a private-sector research work."If passed, this bill would force the retraction of the public access policy of the National Institutes of Health [2], who mandate that recipients of their grants must make their published research publically accessible by depositing full-text versions in open access repositories (such as PubMed Central), and prevent similar policies from being introduced by federal agencies in the future.It is argued [3,4] that research funded by tax-payers should be made available to the public free of charge so that the tax-payer does not in effect pay twice for the research - first for the research to be done and then to read the results. As much as this may be true, the biggest detriment seems to be to developments in science. Open access to research means the widest possible dissemination of information. Limiting access to a (by comparison) small subset of people with subscriptions can stunt further developments.When peer-reviewed information and data is made freely available online, text and data
Therapeutic Options for the Treatment of Hypertension in Children and Adolescents
Mary M. Stephens,MD,MPH,Beth A. Fox
Clinical Medicine Insights: Circulatory, Respiratory and Pulmonary Medicine , 2012,
Abstract:
Rubber Tree Distribution Mapping in Northeast Thailand  [PDF]
Zhe Li, Jefferson M. Fox
International Journal of Geosciences (IJG) , 2011, DOI: 10.4236/ijg.2011.24060
Abstract: In many parts of mainland Southeast Asia rubber plantations are expanding rapidly in areas where the crop was not historically found. Monitoring and mapping the distribution of rubber trees in the region is necessary for developing a better understanding of the consequences of land-cover and land-use change on carbon and water cycles. In this study, we conducted rubber tree growth mapping in Northeast Thailand using Landsat 5 TM data. A Mahalanobis typicality method was used to identify different age rubber trees. Landsat 5 TM 30 m non-thermal reflective bands, NDVI and tasseled cap transformation components were selected as the model input metrics. The validation was carried out using provincial level agricultural statistical data on the rubber tree growth area. At regional (Northeast Thailand) and provincial scales, the estimates of mature and middle-age rubber stands produced from 30 m Landsat 5 TM data compared well (high statistical significance) with the provincial rubber tree growth statistical data.
Fast high fidelity hole spin initialization in a single InGaAs quantum dot
T. M. Godden,S. J. Boyle,A. J. Ramsay,A. M. Fox,M. S. Skolnick
Physics , 2010, DOI: 10.1063/1.3476353
Abstract: We demonstrate fast initialization of a single hole spin captured in an InGaAs quantum dot with a fidelity F>99% by applying a magnetic field parallel to the growth direction. We show that the fidelity of the hole spin, prepared by ionization of a photo-generated electron-hole pair, is limited by the precession of the exciton spin due to the anisotropic exchange interaction.
Response by Allyson C. Fox on "The Genetic Revolution: What? Why? How? "
Fox, A
Online Journal of Issues in Nursing , 2001,
Abstract:
Enhanced photocurrent readout for a quantum dot qubit by bias modulation
J. H. Quilter,R. J. Coles,A. J. Ramsay,A. M. Fox,M. S. Skolnick
Physics , 2013, DOI: 10.1063/1.4804373
Abstract: We demonstrate coherent control of a quantum dot exciton using photocurrent detection with a sinusoidal reverse bias. Optical control is performed at low bias, where tunneling-limited coherence times are long. Following this step, the tunneling rates are increased to remove the long-lived hole, achieving a high photocurrent signal. For a detection efficiency of 68%, electron and hole tunneling times during optical control of 200 ps and 20 ns can be achieved, compared to 120 ps and 7 ns for the constant bias case, respectively.
A Link between ORC-Origin Binding Mechanisms and Origin Activation Time Revealed in Budding Yeast
Timothy Hoggard,Erika Shor,Carolin A. Müller,Conrad A. Nieduszynski ,Catherine A. Fox
PLOS Genetics , 2013, DOI: 10.1371/journal.pgen.1003798
Abstract: Eukaryotic DNA replication origins are selected in G1-phase when the origin recognition complex (ORC) binds chromosomal positions and triggers molecular events culminating in the initiation of DNA replication (a.k.a. origin firing) during S-phase. Each chromosome uses multiple origins for its duplication, and each origin fires at a characteristic time during S-phase, creating a cell-type specific genome replication pattern relevant to differentiation and genome stability. It is unclear whether ORC-origin interactions are relevant to origin activation time. We applied a novel genome-wide strategy to classify origins in the model eukaryote Saccharomyces cerevisiae based on the types of molecular interactions used for ORC-origin binding. Specifically, origins were classified as DNA-dependent when the strength of ORC-origin binding in vivo could be explained by the affinity of ORC for origin DNA in vitro, and, conversely, as ‘chromatin-dependent’ when the ORC-DNA interaction in vitro was insufficient to explain the strength of ORC-origin binding in vivo. These two origin classes differed in terms of nucleosome architecture and dependence on origin-flanking sequences in plasmid replication assays, consistent with local features of chromatin promoting ORC binding at ‘chromatin-dependent’ origins. Finally, the ‘chromatin-dependent’ class was enriched for origins that fire early in S-phase, while the DNA-dependent class was enriched for later firing origins. Conversely, the latest firing origins showed a positive association with the ORC-origin DNA paradigm for normal levels of ORC binding, whereas the earliest firing origins did not. These data reveal a novel association between ORC-origin binding mechanisms and the regulation of origin activation time.
Barriers to Physical Activity in East Harlem, New York
Ashley M. Fox,Devin M. Mann,Michelle A. Ramos,Lawrence C. Kleinman,Carol R. Horowitz
Journal of Obesity , 2012, DOI: 10.1155/2012/719140
Abstract: Background. East Harlem is an epicenter of the intertwining epidemics of obesity and diabetes in New York. Physical activity is thought to prevent and control a number of chronic illnesses, including diabetes, both independently and through weight control. Using data from a survey collected on adult (age 18
Confocal Microscopy of Unfixed Breast Needle Core Biopsies: A Comparison to Fixed and Stained Sections
Linda M Schiffhauer, J Neil Boger, Thomas A Bonfiglio, James M Zavislan, Margarita Zuley, Christi Fox
BMC Cancer , 2009, DOI: 10.1186/1471-2407-9-265
Abstract: Needle core breast specimens from 49 patients were imaged at the time of biopsy. These lesions had been characterized under the Breast Imaging Reporting And Data System (BI-RADS) as category 3, 4 or 5. The core biopsies were imaged with the CSLM before fixation. Samples were treated with 5% citric acid and glycerin USP to enhance nuclear visibility in the reflectance confocal images. Immediately following imaging, the specimens were fixed in buffered formalin and submitted for histological processing and pathological diagnosis. CSLM images were then compared to the standard histology.The pathologic diagnoses by standard histology were 7 invasive ductal carcinomas, 2 invasive lobular carcinomas, 3 ductal carcinomas in-situ (CIS), 21 fibrocystic changes/proliferative conditions, 9 fibroadenomas, and 5 other/benign; two were excluded due to imaging difficulties. Morphologic and cellular features of benign and cancerous lesions were identified in the confocal images and were comparable to standard histologic sections of the same tissue.CSLM is a technique with the potential to screen needle core biopsy specimens in real-time. The confocal images contained sufficient information to identify stromal reactions such as fibrosis and cellular proliferations such as intra-ductal and infiltrating carcinoma, and were comparable to standard histologic sections of the same tissue. Morphologic and cellular features of benign and cancerous lesions were identified in the confocal images. Additional studies are needed to 1.) establish correlation of the confocal and traditional histologic images for the various diseases of the breast; 2.) validate diagnostic use of CSLM and; 3.) further define features of borderline lesions such as well-differentiated ductal CIS vs. atypical hyperplasia.The "Gold Standard" for diagnosis of breast disease is tissue biopsy followed by histological processing and pathologic diagnosis. A frequently used method to perform a breast biopsy is needle core bio
Barriers to Physical Activity in East Harlem, New York
Ashley M. Fox,Devin M. Mann,Michelle A. Ramos,Lawrence C. Kleinman,Carol R. Horowitz
Journal of Obesity , 2012, DOI: 10.1155/2012/719140
Abstract: Background. East Harlem is an epicenter of the intertwining epidemics of obesity and diabetes in New York. Physical activity is thought to prevent and control a number of chronic illnesses, including diabetes, both independently and through weight control. Using data from a survey collected on adult (age 18+) residents of East Harlem, this study evaluated whether perceptions of safety and community-identified barriers were associated with lower levels of physical activity in a diverse sample. Methods. We surveyed 300 adults in a 2-census tract area of East Harlem and took measurements of height and weight. Physical activity was measured in two ways: respondents were classified as having met the weekly recommended target of 2.5 hours of moderate physical activity (walking) per week (or not) and reporting having engaged in at least one recreational physical activity (or not). Perceived barriers were assessed through five items developed by a community advisory board and perceptions of neighborhood safety were measured through an adapted 7-item scale. Two multivariate logistic regression models with perceived barriers and concerns about neighborhood safety were modeled separately as predictors of engaging in recommended levels of exercise and recreational physical activity, controlling for respondent weight and sociodemographic characteristics. Results. The most commonly reported perceived barriers to physical activity identified by nearly half of the sample were being too tired or having little energy followed by pain with exertion and lack of time. Multivariate regression found that individuals who endorsed a greater number of perceived barriers were less likely to report having met their weekly recommended levels of physical activity and less likely to engage in recreational physical activity controlling for covariates. Concerns about neighborhood safety, though prevalent, were not associated with physical activity levels. Conclusions. Although safety concerns were prevalent in this low-income, minority community, it was individual barriers that correlated with lower physical activity levels. 1. Introduction Diabetes prevalence for Blacks and Latinos in the US are nearly double that of Whites (11% of Blacks, 10% of Mexican Americans, and 5% of Whites have diabetes) and Blacks and Latinos have higher obesity prevalence than Whites [1, 2]. Physical activity is proven to help prevent and control diabetes, both independently, and through weight control [3]. East Harlem, New York is a predominantly low-income, Black and Latino community at the epicenter of
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