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Search Results: 1 - 10 of 461900 matches for " A. Kouchner "
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High-energy neutrino astronomy
A. Kouchner
Astrophysics and Space Sciences Transactions (ASTRA) , 2011, DOI: 10.5194/astra-7-35-2011
Abstract: Neutrinos constitute a unique probe since they escape from their sources, travel undisturbed on cosmological distances and are produced in high-energy (HE) hadronic processes. In particular they would allow a direct detection and unambiguous identification of the acceleration sites of HE baryonic cosmic rays (CR), which remain unknown. The latest results achieved with the current experiments are briefly reviewed, including the efforts towards a multi-messenger approach.
Measurement of atmospheric neutrino oscillations with very large volume neutrino telescopes
J. P. Ya?ez,A. Kouchner
Physics , 2015,
Abstract: Neutrino oscillations have been probed during the last few decades using multiple neutrino sources and experimental set-ups. In the recent years, very large volume neutrino telescopes have started contributing to the field. First ANTARES and then IceCube have relied on large and sparsely instrumented volumes to observe atmospheric neutrinos for combinations of baselines and energies inaccessible to other experiments. Using this advantage, the latest result from IceCube starts approaching the precision of other established technologies, and is paving the way for future detectors, such as ORCA and PINGU. These new projects seek to provide better measurements of neutrino oscillation parameters, and eventually determine the neutrino mass ordering. The results from running experiments and the potential from proposed projects are discussed in this review, emphasizing the experimental challenges involved in the measurements.
ANTARES and other Neutrino Telescopes in the Northern Hemisphere
Antoine Kouchner
Physics , 2009, DOI: 10.1016/j.nuclphysbps.2009.09.052
Abstract: Several projects are concentrating their efforts on opening the high energy neutrino window on the Universe with km-scale detectors. The detection principle relies on the observation, using photomultipliers, of the Cherenkov light emitted by charged leptons induced by neutrino interactions in the surrounding detector medium. In the Northern hemisphere, while the pioneering Baikal telescope, has been operating for 10 years, most of the activity now concentrates in the Mediterranean sea. Recently, the Antares collaboration has completed the construction of a 12 line array comprising ~ 900 photomultipliers. In this paper we will review the main results achieved with the detectors currently in operation in the Northern hemisphere, as well as the R&D efforts towards the construction of a large volume neutrino telescope in the Mediterranean.
Mass hierarchy discrimination with atmospheric neutrinos in large volume ice/water Cherenkov detectors
Franco, D.;Jollet, C.;Kouchner, A.;Kulikovskiy, V.;Meregaglia, A.;Perasso, S.;Pradier, T.;Tonazzo, A.;Van Elewyck, V.
High Energy Physics - Phenomenology , 2013,
Abstract: Large mass ice/water Cherenkov experiments, optimized to detect low energy (1-20 GeV) atmospheric neutrinos, have the potential to discriminate between normal and inverted neutrino mass hierarchies. The sensitivity depends on several model and detector parameters, such as the neutrino flux profile and normalization, the Earth density profile, the oscillation parameter uncertainties, and the detector effective mass and resolution. A proper evaluation of the mass hierarchy discrimination power requires a robust statistical approach. In this work, the Toy Monte Carlo, based on an extended unbinned likelihood ratio test statistic, was used. The effect of each model and detector parameter, as well as the required detector exposure, was then studied. While uncertainties on the Earth density and atmospheric neutrino flux profiles were found to have a minor impact on the mass hierarchy discrimination, the flux normalization, as well as some of the oscillation parameter (\Delta m^2_{31}, \theta_{13}, \theta_{23}, and \delta_{CP}) uncertainties and correlations resulted critical. Finally, the minimum required detector exposure, the optimization of the low energy threshold, and the detector resolutions were also investigated.
Mass hierarchy discrimination with atmospheric neutrinos in large volume ice/water Cherenkov detectors
D. Franco,C. Jollet,A. Kouchner,V. Kulikovskiy,A. Meregaglia,S. Perasso,T. Pradier,A. Tonazzo,V. Van Elewyck
Physics , 2013, DOI: 10.1007/JHEP04(2013)008
Abstract: Large mass ice/water Cherenkov experiments, optimized to detect low energy (1-20 GeV) atmospheric neutrinos, have the potential to discriminate between normal and inverted neutrino mass hierarchies. The sensitivity depends on several model and detector parameters, such as the neutrino flux profile and normalization, the Earth density profile, the oscillation parameter uncertainties, and the detector effective mass and resolution. A proper evaluation of the mass hierarchy discrimination power requires a robust statistical approach. In this work, the Toy Monte Carlo, based on an extended unbinned likelihood ratio test statistic, was used. The effect of each model and detector parameter, as well as the required detector exposure, was then studied. While uncertainties on the Earth density and atmospheric neutrino flux profiles were found to have a minor impact on the mass hierarchy discrimination, the flux normalization, as well as some of the oscillation parameter (\Delta m^2_{31}, \theta_{13}, \theta_{23}, and \delta_{CP}) uncertainties and correlations resulted critical. Finally, the minimum required detector exposure, the optimization of the low energy threshold, and the detector resolutions were also investigated.
Joint searches between gravitational-wave interferometers and high-energy neutrino telescopes: science reach and analysis strategies
V. Van Elewyck,S. Ando,Y. Aso,B. Baret,M. Barsuglia,I. Bartos,E. Chassande-Mottin,I. Di Palma,J. Dwyer,C. Finley,K. Kotake,A. Kouchner,S. Marka,Z. Marka,J. Rollins,C. D. Ott,T. Pradier,A. Searle
Physics , 2009, DOI: 10.1142/S0218271809015655
Abstract: Many of the astrophysical sources and violent phenomena observed in our Universe are potential emitters of gravitational waves (GWs) and high-energy neutrinos (HENs). A network of GW detectors such as LIGO and Virgo can determine the direction/time of GW bursts while the IceCube and ANTARES neutrino telescopes can also provide accurate directional information for HEN events. Requiring the consistency between both, totally independent, detection channels shall enable new searches for cosmic events arriving from potential common sources, of which many extra-galactic objects.
Multimessenger astronomy with gravitational waves and high-energy neutrinos
S. Ando,B. Baret,B. Bouhou,E. Chassande-Mottin,A. Kouchner,L. Moscoso,V. Van Elewyck,I. Bartos,S. Márka,Z. Márka,A. Corsi,I. Di Palma,M. A. Papa,A. Dietz,C. Donzaud,D. Eichler,C. Finley,D. Guetta,F. Halzen,G. Jones,P. J. Sutton,S. Kandhasamy,V. Mandic,E. Thrane,K. Kotake,T. Piran,T. Pradier,G. E. Romero,E. Waxman
Physics , 2012, DOI: 10.1103/RevModPhys.85.1401
Abstract: Many of the astrophysical sources and violent phenomena observed in our Universe are potential emitters of gravitational waves (GW) and high-energy neutrinos (HEN). Both GWs and HENs may escape very dense media and travel unaffected over cosmological distances, carrying information from the innermost regions of the astrophysical engines. Such messengers could also reveal new, hidden sources that have not been observed by conventional photon-based astronomy. Coincident observation of GWs and HENs may thus play a critical role in multimessenger astronomy. This is particularly true at the present time owing to the advent of a new generation of dedicated detectors: IceCube, ANTARES, VIRGO and LIGO. Given the complexity of the instruments, a successful joint analysis of this data set will be possible only if the expertise and knowledge of the data is shared between the two communities. This review aims at providing an overview of both theoretical and experimental state-of-the-art and perspectives for such a GW+HEN multimessenger astronomy.
CeLAND: search for a 4th light neutrino state with a 3 PBq 144Ce-144Pr electron antineutrino generator in KamLAND
A. Gando,Y. Gando,S. Hayashida,H. Ikeda,K. Inoue,K. Ishidoshiro,H. Ishikawa,M. Koga,R. Matsuda,S. Matsuda,T. Mitsui,D. Motoki,K. Nakamura,Y. Oki,M. Otani,I. Shimizu,J. Shirai,F. Suekane,A. Suzuki,Y. Takemoto,K. Tamae,K. Ueshima,H. Watanabe,B. D. Xu,S. Yamada,Y. Yamauchi,H. Yoshida,M. Cribier,M. Durero,V. Fischer,J. Gaffiot,N. Jonqueres,A. Kouchner,T. Lasserre,D. Leterme,A. Letourneau,D. Lhuillier,G. Mention,G. Rampal,L. Scola,Ch. Veyssiere,M. Vivier,P. Yala,B. E. Berger,A. Kozlov,T. Banks,D. Dwyer,B. K. Fujikawa,K. Han,Yu. G. Kolomensky,Y. Mei,T. O'Donnell,P. Decowski,D. M. Markoff,S. Yoshida,V. N. Kornoukhov,T. V. M. Gelis,G. V. Tikhomirov,J. G. Learned,J. Maricic,S. Matsuno,R. Milincic,H. J. Karwowski,Y. Efremenko,A. Detwiler,S. Enomoto
Physics , 2013,
Abstract: The reactor neutrino and gallium anomalies can be tested with a 3-4 PBq (75-100 kCi scale) 144Ce-144Pr antineutrino beta-source deployed at the center or next to a large low-background liquid scintillator detector. The antineutrino generator will be produced by the Russian reprocessing plant PA Mayak as early as 2014, transported to Japan, and deployed in the Kamioka Liquid Scintillator Anti-Neutrino Detector (KamLAND) as early as 2015. KamLAND's 13 m diameter target volume provides a suitable environment to measure the energy and position dependence of the detected neutrino flux. A characteristic oscillation pattern would be visible for a baseline of about 10 m or less, providing a very clean signal of neutrino disappearance into a yet-unknown, sterile neutrino state. This will provide a comprehensive test of the electron dissaperance neutrino anomalies and could lead to the discovery of a 4th neutrino state for Delta_m^2 > 0.1 eV^2 and sin^2(2theta) > 0.05.
Constraining the neutrino emission of gravitationally lensed Flat-Spectrum Radio Quasars with ANTARES data
S. Adrián-Martínez,A. Albert,M. André,G. Anton,M. Ardid,J. -J. Aubert,B. Baret,J. Barrios-Martì,S. Basa,V. Bertin,S. Biagi,C. Bogazzi,R. Bormuth,M. Bou-Cabo,M. C. Bouwhuis,R. Bruijn,J. Brunner,J. Busto,A. Capone,L. Caramete,J. Carr,T. Chiarusi,M. Circella,R. Coniglione,L. Core,H. Costantini,P. Coyle,A. Creusot,G. De Rosa,I. Dekeyser,A. Deschamps,G. DeBonis,C. Distefano,C. Donzaud,D. Dornic,Q. Dorosti,D. Drouhin,A. Dumas,T. Eberl,D. Els?sser,A. Enzenh?fer,S. Escoffier,K. Fehn,I. Felis,P. Fermani,F. Folger,L. A. Fusco,S. Galatà,P. Gay,S. Gei?els?der,K. Geyer,V. Giordano,A. Gleixner,J. P. Gómez-González,K. Graf,G. Guillard,H. van Haren,A. J. Heijboer,Y. Hello,J. J. Hernández-Rey,B. Herold,A. Herrero,J. H??l,J. Hofest?dt,C. Hugon,C. W. James,M. de Jong,M. Kadler,O. Kalekin,A. Kappes,U. Katz,D. Kie?ling,P. Kooijman,A. Kouchner,I. Kreykenbohm,V. Kulikovskiy,R. Lahmann,E. Lambard,G. Lambard,D. Lefèvre,E. Leonora,H. Loehner,S. Loucatos,S. Mangano,M. Marcelin,A. Margiotta,J. A. Martínez-Mora,S. Martini,A. Mathieu,T. Michael,P. Migliozzi,C. Müller,M. Neff,E. Nezri,D. Palioselitis,G. E. P?v?la?,C. Perrina,V. Popa,T. Pradier,C. Racca,G. Riccobene,R. Richter,K. Roensch,A. Rostovtsev,M. Salda?a,D. F. E. Samtleben,A. Sánchez-Losa,M. Sanguineti,J. Schmid,J. Schnabel,S. Schulte,F. Schüssler,T. Seitz,C. Sieger,A. Spies,M. Spurio,J. J. M. Steijger,Th. Stolarczyk,M. Taiuti,C. Tamburini,Y. Tayalati,A. Trovato,M. Tselengidou,C. T?nnis,B. Vallage,C. Vallée,V. Van Elewyck,E. Visser,D. Vivolo
Physics , 2014, DOI: 10.1088/1475-7516/2014/11/017
Abstract: This paper proposes to exploit gravitational lensing effects to improve the sensitivity of neutrino telescopes to the intrinsic neutrino emission of distant blazar populations. This strategy is illustrated with a search for cosmic neutrinos in the direction of four distant and gravitationally lensed Flat-Spectrum Radio Quasars. The magnification factor is estimated for each system assuming a singular isothermal profile for the lens. Based on data collected from 2007 to 2012 by the ANTARES neutrino telescope, the strongest constraint is obtained from the lensed quasar B0218+357, providing a limit on the total neutrino luminosity of this source of $1.08\times 10^{46}\,\mathrm{erg}\,\mathrm{s}^{-1}$. This limit is about one order of magnitude lower than those previously obtained in the ANTARES standard point source searches with non-lensed Flat-Spectrum Radio Quasars.
Time calibration with atmospheric muon tracks in the ANTARES neutrino telescope
S. Adrián-Martínez,A. Albert,M. André,G. Anton,M. Ardid,J. -J. Aubert,B. Baret,J. Barrios-Martí,S. Basa,V. Bertin,S. Biagi,C. Bogazzi,R. Bormuth,M. Bou-Cabo,M. C. Bouwhuis,R. Bruijn,J. Brunner,J. Busto,A. Capone,L. Caramete,J. Carr,T. Chiarusi,M. Circella,R. Coniglione,H. Costantini,P. Coyle,A. Creusot,I. Dekeyser,A. Deschamps,G. De Bonis,C. Distefano,C. Donzaud,D. Dornic,D. Drouhin,A. Dumas,T. Eberl,D. Els?sser,A. Enzenh?fer,K. Fehn,I. Felis,P. Fermani,V. Flaminio,F. Folger,L. A. Fusco,S. Galatà,P. Gay,S. Gei?els?der,K. Geyer,V. Giordano,A. Gleixner,R. Gracia-Ruiz,J. P. Gómez-González,K. Graf,H. van Haren,A. J. Heijboer,Y. Hello,J. J. Hernández-Rey,A. Herrero,J. H??l,J. Hofest?dt,C. Hugon,C. W James,M. de Jong,M. Kadler,O. Kalekin,U. Katz,D. Kie?ling,P. Kooijman,A. Kouchner,I. Kreykenbohm,V. Kulikovskiy,R Lahmann,G. Lambard,D. Lattuada,D. Lefèvre,E. Leonora,S. Loucatos,S. Mangano,M. Marcelin,A. Margiotta,A. Marinelli,J. A. Martínez-Mora,S. Martini,A. Mathieu,T. Michael,P. Migliozzi,A. Moussa,C. Mueller,M. Neff,E. Nezri,G. E. P?v?la?,C. Pellegrino,C. Perrina,P. Piattelli,V. Popa,T. Pradier,C. Racca,G. Riccobene,R. Richter,K. Roensch,A. Rostovtsev,M. Salda?a,D. F. E. Samtleben,A. Sánchez-Losa,M. Sanguineti,P. Sapienza,J. Schmid,J. Schnabel,S. Schulte,F. Schüssler,T. Seitz,C. Sieger,M. Spurio,J. J. M. Steijger,Th. Stolarczyk,M. Taiuti,C. Tamburini,A. Trovato,M. Tselengidou,C. T?nnis,D. Turpin,B. Vallage,C. Vallée,V. Van Elewyck,E. Visser,D. Vivolo,S. Wagner,J. Wilms
Physics , 2015,
Abstract: The ANTARES experiment consists of an array of photomultipliers distributed along 12 lines and located deep underwater in the Mediterranean Sea. It searches for astrophysical neutrinos collecting the Cherenkov light induced by the charged particles, mainly muons, produced in neutrino interactions around the detector. Since at energies of $\sim$10 TeV the muon and the incident neutrino are almost collinear, it is possible to use the ANTARES detector as a neutrino telescope and identify a source of neutrinos in the sky starting from a precise reconstruction of the muon trajectory. To get this result, the arrival times of the Cherenkov photons must be accurately measured. A to perform time calibrations with the precision required to have optimal performances of the instrument is described. The reconstructed tracks of the atmospheric muons in the ANTARES detector are used to determine the relative time offsets between photomultipliers. Currently, this method is used to obtain the time calibration constants for photomultipliers on different lines at a precision level of 0.5 ns. It has also been validated for calibrating photomultipliers on the same line, using a system of LEDs and laser light devices.
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