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Search Results: 1 - 10 of 461808 matches for "  Javadzadeh A "
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Evaluation of planning and performance of health centres of social security organization in relation to occupational diseases
Javadzadeh Ahmadi A,Fesharaki M
Tehran University Medical Journal , 1998,
Abstract: The chief aim of this research is intended to study the planning and performance of the health and treatment units of the Social Security Organization about the illnesses that may occur in connection with occupations. We believe, however, that healthy skilled work force are the nmost important factors for the development and progress of a country. Therefore, illnesses and disabilities from chemical, physical, biological, psychological and ergonomic can be drasticly eliminated in order to ensure the safety standards of the work force. Five occupational medicine centers in Tehran, have undergone 35199 tests for pre-employment medical examinations. The results were fit, conditionally fit, and unfit that were introduced to employers, during August 1996 and July 1997. Periodical examinations, visits of workshops and factories, presentation of health care in 200 dispensaries has helped recognizing professional diseases. The results work of committee of medical assistant, showed 56 cases of disabilities due to occupation. Professional causes, 16.07% of the above disabilities are from mechanical and, 16.07% from transportation. Hands amputation 50%, injuries of waist 19.65%, feet 10.71% and head 7.14% had responsibility for invalidity due to occupations. Other results of this research like time distribution, causes of invalidity have been presented.
An Update Review of Prophylactic Antibiotic in Dentistry
Javadzadeh Bolouri A.,Pakfetrat A.,Tonkaboni A.
Journal of Dentistry , 2011,
Abstract: Despite the absence of any signs of infection in the oral cavity, all dentists and specialists should take prevention of infection and conditions leading to high risk infection into account. Antibiotic prophylaxis could inhibit or lessen the rate of such occurrences.The aim of this review was to describe all risks and side effects of missing prophylaxis and also to mention mechanisms and conditions which precipitate these risks. Hence, we could categorize and exactly define these risks and patients at risk and recommend the best approaches to preventing the risks, selecting antibiotic type, appropriate time for indication, duration of administration, and also all changes based on specific cases.
Pars plana vitrectomy and internal limiting membrane peeling for macular edema secondary to retinal vein occlusion
Baharivand N, Hariri A, Javadzadeh A, Heidari E, Sadegi K
Clinical Ophthalmology , 2011, DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/OPTH.S23164
Abstract: rs plana vitrectomy and internal limiting membrane peeling for macular edema secondary to retinal vein occlusion Original Research (3118) Total Article Views Authors: Baharivand N, Hariri A, Javadzadeh A, Heidari E, Sadegi K Published Date August 2011 Volume 2011:5 Pages 1089 - 1093 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/OPTH.S23164 Nader Baharivand, Amirhossein Hariri, Alireza Javadzadeh, Ebadollah Heidari, Karim Sadegi Nikookari Eye Hospital, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, Iran Purpose: To evaluate the effects of vitrectomy and internal limiting membrane peeling for treatment of macular edema secondary to retinal vein occlusion (RVO). Methods: Nine cases of visual loss due to macular edema caused by central retinal vein occlusion or branch retinal vein occlusion underwent pars plana vitrectomy with removal of the preretinal hyaloid, peeling of the internal limiting membrane stained with indocyanine green dye, air–fluid exchange, and postoperative prone positioning. Best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) and central foveal thickness by optical coherence tomography were measured pre- and postoperatively then compared to assess the outcome of surgery. Results: In all cases intraretinal blood and retinal thickening diminished within 2 months of surgery. Visual acuity improved in all of the central retinal vein occlusion cases and 3/6 branch retinal vein occlusion cases. The decrease in macular thickness was statistically significant (mean postoperative macular thickness 361 ± 61.1 versus mean preoperative macular thickness 563.9 ± 90.0, P = 0.001, t-test). The improvement in BCVA was not statistically significant (mean preoperative BCVA in LogMAR 1.23 ± 0.29 versus mean postoperative BCVA in LogMAR 1.06 ± 0.49, P = 0.09, t-test). Conclusion: In eyes with macular edema secondary to RVO, pars plana vitrectomy with internal limiting membrane peeling can resolve macular edema, but the improvement in BCVA was not statistically significant in this study.
The effect of posterior subtenon methylprednisolone acetate in the refractory diabetic macular edema: a prospective nonrandomized interventional case series
Alireza Javadzadeh
BMC Ophthalmology , 2006, DOI: 10.1186/1471-2415-6-15
Abstract: In a prospective, nonrandomized, interventional case series, 52 eyes were diagnosed with CSME and treated with at least two sessions of laser photocoagulation according to Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study guidelines. At least 3 months after laser therapy, eyes with a residual central macular thickness were offered posterior subtenon injection of 40 mg methylprednisolone acetate. Main outcome measures were visual acuity, macular thickness and intraocular pressure. Potential complications were monitored, including intraocular pressure response, cataract progression and scleral perforation.Mean baseline visual acuity (in logMAR) improved significantly (p = 0.003) from 0.8 ± 0.36 to 0.6 ± 0.41 at 3 months. Mean foveal thickness decreased from 388 ± 78 μm at baseline to 231 ± 40 μm after 3 months (p < 0.0001). Visual acuity improvement in eyes with CSME with extrafoveal hard exudates was significant (p = 0.0001), but not significant in eyes with CSME with subfoveal hard exudates (p = 0.32). Intraocular pressure increased from 14.7 ± 2.0 mmHg (range, 12–18 mmHg) to a maximum value of 15.9 ± 2.1 mmHg (range, 12–20 mmHg) during the follow-up period. Complications in two eyes developed focal conjunctival necrosis at the site of injection.Posterior subtenon methylprednisolone acetate may improve early visual outcome in diffuse diabetic macular edema that fails to respond to conventional laser photocoagulation. Visual acuity improvement in eyes with CSME with extrafoveal hard exudates was significant; and this improvement is depends on location of hard exudates. Further study is needed to assess the long-term efficacy, safety, and retreatment.Diabetic retinopathy is the major cause of blindness in the United States in patients younger than 50 years of age, and macular edema is the leading cause of visual impairment in diabetic patients [1]. As might be expected, the prevalence of macular edema is directly related to the overall severity of the retinopathy and instruc
THE HAZARD OF INDUCING FENERAL ANESTHESIA BEFORE CORRECTION OF AIRWAY OBSTRUCTION
ZEINALABEDIN JAVADZADEH
Acta Medica Iranica , 1987,
Abstract: Preoperative diagnosis of an airway obstruction should alert anesthetist to a potentially life threatening situation. Intubation of the trachea while the patient is awa- ke or tra~heostomy under local anesthesia is a most useful technique and safty method in induction of anesthesia where problems are anticipated during the induction or g e ne r a l anesthesia.
Pars plana vitrectomy and internal limiting membrane peeling for macular edema secondary to retinal vein occlusion
Bahariv,N,Hariri A, Javadzadeh A, Heidari E,Sadegi K
Clinical Ophthalmology , 2011,
Abstract: Nader Baharivand, Amirhossein Hariri, Alireza Javadzadeh, Ebadollah Heidari, Karim SadegiNikookari Eye Hospital, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, IranPurpose: To evaluate the effects of vitrectomy and internal limiting membrane peeling for treatment of macular edema secondary to retinal vein occlusion (RVO).Methods: Nine cases of visual loss due to macular edema caused by central retinal vein occlusion or branch retinal vein occlusion underwent pars plana vitrectomy with removal of the preretinal hyaloid, peeling of the internal limiting membrane stained with indocyanine green dye, air–fluid exchange, and postoperative prone positioning. Best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) and central foveal thickness by optical coherence tomography were measured pre- and postoperatively then compared to assess the outcome of surgery.Results: In all cases intraretinal blood and retinal thickening diminished within 2 months of surgery. Visual acuity improved in all of the central retinal vein occlusion cases and 3/6 branch retinal vein occlusion cases. The decrease in macular thickness was statistically significant (mean postoperative macular thickness 361 ± 61.1 versus mean preoperative macular thickness 563.9 ± 90.0, P = 0.001, t-test). The improvement in BCVA was not statistically significant (mean preoperative BCVA in LogMAR 1.23 ± 0.29 versus mean postoperative BCVA in LogMAR 1.06 ± 0.49, P = 0.09, t-test).Conclusion: In eyes with macular edema secondary to RVO, pars plana vitrectomy with internal limiting membrane peeling can resolve macular edema, but the improvement in BCVA was not statistically significant in this study.Keywords: air–fluid exchange, retinal thickening, retinal hypoxia, concomitant retinal ischemia
The Role of Nodes Distribution in Extending the Lifetime of Wireless Sensor Networks
Mitra Javadzadeh,Aliazam Abbasfar
International Journal of Distributed Sensor Networks , 2011, DOI: 10.1155/2011/978164
Abstract: One of the most important issues in sensor networks is prolonging the network lifetime. In this paper, we demonstrate that given a constant number of nodes, how distribution of nodes affects the lifetime. For this purpose, we first show that in a network with cluster-based routing protocol, nodes do not have equal importance, and their importance depends on their location, and we determine the most critical regions. We prove that the uniform distribution of nodes is not a good distribution. Finally, we propose a solution for the best distribution that concentrates the population of nodes on critical areas. Simulation results of our proposed distribution show a remarkable increase in network lifetime. 1. Introduction A sensor network consists of a large number of sensor nodes deployed over an area. Nodes are low cost and are usually equipped with a power supply, a microprocessor, microsensors, and radio component that provides for wireless communication between nodes. This set of nodes is used for a variety of applications. The most common use is to monitor changes in a special parameter in a region. For instance, in [1], the temperature and humidity of different elevations of a tree are measured over a period of time, or, in [2], the environment of a coalmine is monitored by a wireless sensor network. The most distinctive characteristic of a sensor network is the limited energy supply available for each node (a typical battery) due to their small size. Moreover, because of their size and low cost it would not be beneficial to recharge or replace the depleted battery of the nodes. In other words, every node is deemed useless after its battery discharges; therefore, finding energy-efficient routing protocols has become a significant issue. Flooding and gossiping [3], SPIN [4], LEACH [5], and HEED [6] are some examples of routing protocols proposed in the literature. One of the most well-known techniques is clustering in which nodes are divided into groups called clusters with a node assigned as the cluster head. This technique prevents long-distance communication from distant nodes to the base station, thus, manages to save considerable amounts of energy. Instead, nodes included in a cluster communicate directly with their cluster head, and cluster heads forward the information to the base station within one-hop or multihop routes [7–10]. Clustering algorithms vary mainly based on their number of cluster heads, methods to form a cluster, cluster head election techniques, intercluster communications, and so forth. One of the primary goals of all mentioned
Gyrate atrophy of the choroid and retina with hyper-ornithinemia responsive to vitamin B6: a case report
Alireza Javadzadeh, Davood Gharabaghi
Journal of Medical Case Reports , 2007, DOI: 10.1186/1752-1947-1-27
Abstract: This report presents a case of a 28-year-old man consulting for a progressive fall of visual acuity with hemeralopia. Eye fundoscopy showed regions of confluent rounded chorioretinal atrophy. The visual field and retinal angiography were altered. A high level of plasma ornithine (629 nmol/mL) was detected and a diagnosis of gyrate atrophy of the retina and choroid was made. The patient was treated with high dose Pyridoxine supplement (300 mg/d for 6 months) and the ornithine level of his serum was successfully reduced.The exact mechanism of chorioretinal atrophy in hyper-ornithinemia is not known and a small percentage of the affected people respond to Vitamin B6 supplementation.Gyrate atrophy (GA) of the Choroid and Retina was first described by Fuchs in 1896.[1] Human hereditary deficiency of ornithine aminotransferase (OAT) activity is transmitted as an autosomal recessive trait,[2] and results in 10 to 20-fold increased level of plasma ornithine and is shown to be associated with GA.[3] The initial complaint of decreasing visual acuity and night vision is followed by the appearance of sharply demarcated, circular areas of chorioretinal atrophy with hyperpigmented margins in the midperiphery of the fundus. This appears through the first three decades of life and leads to blindness in the fourth to seventh decades. Myopia, posterior subcapsular cataracts, and vitreous opacities may also be present.[4]Ornithine delta aminotransferase (OAT) is a mitochondrial nuclear encoded pyridoxal phosphate enzyme that catalyzes the interconversion of ornithine glutamate and proline. Gyrate atrophy is a genetic disorders with increased frequency in the Finnish population with an incidence of one case per 50,000 individuals in Finland.[4] Valle in a review in 2001 revealed that amongst the over 150 biochemically documented cases of GA, about one third of them were from Finland and only seven of them (less than 5%) had been responsive to therapy with Vitamin B6 dietary supplementa
Lateral rectus muscle disinsertion and reattachment to the lateral orbital wall in exotropic Duane syndrome: a case report
Dima Andalib, Alireza Javadzadeh
Journal of Medical Case Reports , 2008, DOI: 10.1186/1752-1947-2-253
Abstract: We report a case of a 7-year-old boy who underwent this procedure for severe upshoot, globe retraction and exotropia in the left eye due to Duane syndrome. The patient achieved satisfactory ocular alignment following surgery. Upshoot and globe retraction were substantially improved.Lateral rectus muscle disinsertion and reattachment to the lateral orbital wall is a safe and effective procedure for weakening of the anomalous lateral rectus muscle in Exotropic Duane Syndrome.Duane syndrome is an ocular motility disorder characterized by anomalous innervation of the lateral rectus muscle [1]. Abnormal innervation of the lateral rectus results in limitation to adduction and abduction, cocontraction of the horizontal rectus muscle, globe retraction, eyelid fissure changes and anomalous vertical movement [2], such as upshoot or downshoot [3]. Patients with Duane syndrome may have strabismus in the primary position, most commonly esotropia, and adopt a face turn to balance the alignment [1]. The upshoot or downshoot in Duane syndrome can be cosmetically unacceptable.Various surgical approaches have been described for the treatment of upshoot and downshoot in Duane syndrome including recession of the lateral and medial rectus muscle, Y splitting of the lateral rectus muscle at the insertion, and posterior fixation suture of the horizontal rectus muscles [3]. Lateral rectus muscle disinsertion and reattachment to the lateral orbital wall is a new weakening procedure for special forms of strabismus including third nerve palsy and Duane syndrome with esotropia [4].We report a case of a patient with unilateral Duane syndrome with exotropia who underwent this procedure for correction of severe upshoot and globe retraction.The parents of a 7-year-old boy noted that he had been unable to move his left eye outward since childhood. He had one strabismus surgery (large lateral rectus recession) in the left eye due to exotropia at the age of 3 years. Visual acuity was 20/20 in each ey
DEVELOPING OF A NEW COMPREHENSIVE SPARK IGNITION ENGINES CODE FOR HEAT LOSS ANALYSIS WITHIN COMBUSTION CHAMBER WALLS
Shahram Khalilarya,Mohammad Javadzadeh
Thermal Science , 2010, DOI: tsci10041013k
Abstract: The objective of this work is to develop the existing a zero-dimensional model named ODES to provide detailed insights into the internal process of the modern high speed spark ignition engines. Therefore, it has been concentrated on the development of new sub models for incorporation in an extended form of ODES, as follows: - the existing semi-empirical combustion model has been replaced by a new comprehensive model, which is based on the turbulent flame speed in the combustion chamber. - the existing three wall heat transfer model has been replaced by a new one in which, the combustion chamber is divided in to three zones including cylinder head, cylinder wall, and piston head. The steady-state heat transfer equation is solved through finite difference method with replaced boundary and initial conditions. The results gave the temperature distribution of combustion chamber walls. The rate of heat losses from combustion chamber to the coolant is calculated by using the mean temperature of each part. The code has been extensively validated with respect to performance and heat transfer against experimental results obtained on XU7JP spark ignition engine with two kinds of fuel, gasoline and compresed natural gas and gave good agreement with available experimental.
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