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Search Results: 1 - 10 of 5740 matches for " functional foods "
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Production and Sensory Evaluation of Novel Cheeses Made with Prebiotic Substances: Inulin and Oligofructose  [PDF]
Laura M. Machuca, Yamila E. Rodriguez, Daniela E. Guastavino Meneguini, María E. Bruzzo, María F. Acu?a Ojeda, Marcelo C. Murguía
Food and Nutrition Sciences (FNS) , 2015, DOI: 10.4236/fns.2015.616153
Abstract: In recent years, the processing and consumption of functional foods worldwide have greatly increased. These foods benefit the body functions which improve consumers’ health and also reduce the risk factors that cause the onset of disease. Furthermore, prebiotic substances favor the multiplication of beneficial intestinal bacteria rather than harmful ones. The purpose of this study was to conduct the sensory evaluation of two functional cheeses containing inulin and oligofructose as a distinctive ingredient, including testing a cheese made with conventional ingredients, called control cheese. Affective type tests, which measured the degree of liking or disliking, were conducted using a verbal 7-point hedonic scale. According to the inclusion and exclusion criteria, 57 untrained judges were selected. This study is a quantitative, analytic and experimental-cross design. Statistical analysis of the data was performed by ANOVA with repeated measures. The results show a similar average degree of liking for the three cheeses, above 5 on the scale or “like”. By analyzing the critical level and the result of the Mauchly’s sphericity test, it is concluded that there is no statistically significant difference in the degree of liking for the three cheeses. Therefore, the addition of prebiotics to artisanal cheeses achieves to satisfy consumers and provide them benefits superior to those provided by traditional foods.
Functional Foods for Obesity Management  [PDF]
Rajitha Sunkara, Martha Verghese
Food and Nutrition Sciences (FNS) , 2014, DOI: 10.4236/fns.2014.514148
Abstract:

Obesity is a global problem and numbers are rising at a fast pace in developing countries and it becomes a major public health concern. Economic costs associated with obesity are high and increasing as the rate of obesity. Obesity leads to its co-morbidities; namely diabetes, hypertension, cardiovascular diseases, osteoarthritis, stroke and inflammatory diseases. Changes in life-style along with modifications to the diet are important in the management of obesity. Certain dietary components and foods have the ability to induce thermogenesis and modify the trafficking of nutrients in the body. Positive effects in managing obesity by natural components, and selected foods have drawn attention due to the potential side effects of obesity drugs. The food industry has developed low-density foods to reduce energy intake. Now focus has been geared towards the development of foods that possess more than one mechanism to alter the progression of obesity. In this review, selected foods and their components with potential anti-obesity properties are discussed.


Antioxidant, Antibacterial and Antitumor Activity of Ethanolic Extract of the Psidium guajava Leaves  [PDF]
Tatiane Vieira Braga, Rosana Gon?alves Rodrigues das Dores, Camila Soncin Ramos, Fernanda Cristina Gontijo Evangelista, Letícia Márcia da Silva Tinoco, Fernando de Pilla Varotti, Maria das Gra?as Carvalho, Adriano de Paula Sabino
American Journal of Plant Sciences (AJPS) , 2014, DOI: 10.4236/ajps.2014.523365
Abstract:
Psidium guajava L. has extensive use in folk medicine. The aim of this study was to quantify the levels of phenolic, flavonoids, antioxidant activity, leathality assay and antibacterial and antitumoral activities of the extract of P. guajava. In the dry guava extract there were high levels of phenolics (766.08 ± 14.52 mg/g), flavonoids (118.90 ± 5.47 mg/g) and antioxidant activity (87.65%). The LD50 was 185.15 μg/ml. The MIC value was 250 μg/ml for Streptococcus mutans, Streptococcus mitis and Streptococcus oralis. IC50 of the extract tested in the HeLa, RKO and Wi cell lines was 15.6 ± 0.8 μg/ml, 21.2 ± 1.1 μg/ml and 68.9 ± 1.5 μg/ml, respectively. The results of all analyses allow us to conclude that the dry extract of guava leaves has promising activity to be applied topically in the oral cavity or in the development of antitumor formulation or even be used as a functional food.
Functional Foods, Old Age and Diabetes  [PDF]
Marta Coronado Herrera, Rey Gutiérrez Tolentino, Salvador Vega y León, Claudia Radilla Vázquez, Marcela Vazquez Francisca, María de Lourdes Ramírez Vega
Food and Nutrition Sciences (FNS) , 2015, DOI: 10.4236/fns.2015.616155
Abstract: The aim of this paper is to analyze aspects of nutrition and nourishment among elderly diabetic people. It is presented the current research of products with functional food properties that provide not only nutritional value but also other components which encourage a better quality of life during aging. In addition, it includes natural and industrialized functional foods that are commercialized and may be good for daily consumption.
Fortification of mushroom with calcium by vacuum impregnation
Ortíz,C. F.; Salvatori,D. M.; Alzamora,S. M.;
Latin American applied research , 2003,
Abstract: foods with added physiologically-active food components (pac) are receiving special attention by their potential in disease prevention and health promotion. additional intake of any nutrient might be achieved by the application of vacuum impregnation technique to fruits and vegetables. viability of mushroom as matrix for the incorporation of calcium was then evaluated. it was found that, due to the high impregnated liquid fraction observed (17 - 40 %), the calcium incorporated in 100 g of mushroom would satisfy about 24 - 32 % of the adequate intake (ai). thus, there would seem to be much potential for the introduction of high ca2+ concentration in mushroom tissue through vacuum impregnation, combating the widespread ca2+ deficiencies that occur in human populations. although mechanical properties are affected by the vacuum treatment, similar or greater mushroom softening is produced during post-harvest storage or commercial thermal processing.
LA EXPERIENCIA JAPONESA CON LOS ALIMENTOS FOSHU: ?LOS VERDADEROS ALIMENTOS FUNCIONALES?
Durán C,Rodrigo; Valenzuela B,Alfonso;
Revista chilena de nutrición , 2010, DOI: 10.4067/S0717-75182010000200012
Abstract: interest about "functional foods" has been raised in western countries in the last ten years. however, these foods have not been officially recognized and categorized by the regulatory agencies. japan has an advantage of thirty years in the development of this concept. because of the improvement in the economical situation of the country after the end of the second world war, the life expectancy of the population has increased considerably. consequently, the high increase in health expenses, give rise to a concern for the government, together with academy and food industry, to the search of new types of foods having a positive effect on the health of the consumer, leading to the development of foshu foods (food with specified health uses). japanese foshu category is established after clinical and epidemiological trials demonstrating positive effect of these foods in the prevention of some specific diseases. foshu products are approved after rigorous selection procedures and their effects must be constantly evaluated. foods having foshu category may exhibit a characteristic logo in their packages, which is highly recognized and valued by consumers. the concept and the origin of foshu, the regulations that are applied to these products and the importance of these foods for the health of japanese population are reviewed in the present report.
Fortification of mushroom with calcium by vacuum impregnation
C. F. Ortíz,D. M. Salvatori,S. M. Alzamora
Latin American applied research , 2003,
Abstract: Foods with added physiologically-active food components (PAC) are receiving special attention by their potential in disease prevention and health promotion. Additional intake of any nutrient might be achieved by the application of vacuum impregnation technique to fruits and vegetables. Viability of mushroom as matrix for the incorporation of calcium was then evaluated. It was found that, due to the high impregnated liquid fraction observed (17 - 40 %), the calcium incorporated in 100 g of mushroom would satisfy about 24 - 32 % of the Adequate Intake (AI). Thus, there would seem to be much potential for the introduction of high Ca2+ concentration in mushroom tissue through vacuum impregnation, combating the widespread Ca2+ deficiencies that occur in human populations. Although mechanical properties are affected by the vacuum treatment, similar or greater mushroom softening is produced during post-harvest storage or commercial thermal processing.
Role of functional foods in periodontal health and disease
M P Singh,Archana Bhatia
Indian Journal of Dental Advancements , 2011, DOI: 10.5866/3.3.587
Abstract: Probiotics is a live microbial feed supplement which beneficially affects the host animal by improving its intestinal microbial balance whereas Prebiotics are nondigestible substances (dietary fiber)that exert some biological effect on humans by selective stimulation of growth or bioactivity of beneficial microorganisms either present or therapeutically introduced to the intestine. This review focuses on the use of functional foods as preventive and therapeutic products for oral healthcare. Scientific understanding of functional foods and their potential for preventing and treating periodontal conditions is at its infancy, but moving ahead. Therefore, properly controlled, randomized,long term clinical trials are needed using the most promising strains and also testing various methods of application.
Food Functionality of Popular and Commonly Consumed Indigenous Vegetables and Fruits from Bangladesh  [PDF]
M. M. Towhidul Islam, Arnab Talukder, Taibur Rahman, Jahid M. M. Islam, Shahdat Hossain, Hossain Uddin Shekhar
Food and Nutrition Sciences (FNS) , 2013, DOI: 10.4236/fns.2013.47095
Abstract: Functional food can be either natural or processed. Food contains known biologically active compounds, which provides clinically proven and documented health benefit. So far, no database is available in Bangladesh regarding the functionality of the indigenous foods. As a primary step, this study had been conducted with an aim to identify and characterize functionality of the indigenous foods of Bangladesh. Eight fruits and vegetables, which are very popular for their taste, price and easy availability, have been selected for in vitro screening of their functionality. High levels of fat and sugar binding capacity were observed in Pineapple (500% and 270.891% respectively). High nuplli mortality rate was found in cytotoxicity test with Pomelo extract (100%), which also contained high level of vitamin C (155 mg/100g). Pomelo contained the highest level of antioxidant among all these foods (0.674 nMol/100μl/mg protein). Red amaranth contained highest amount of protein (4.31 g/100g). In stem amaranth, Iron level was highest (1855.67 mg/kg). Total phenolics content of Water spinach and Stem amaranth were found higher than the other samples (59.339 and 55.728 mg GAE/g respectively). All these experiments showed these vegetables and fruits have high health impacts and can be act as potential functional foods.
Antioxidants, Chemical Composition and Minerals in Freeze-Dried Camu-Camu (Myrciaria dubia (H.B.K.) Mc Vaugh) Pulp  [PDF]
Jaime Paiva Lopes Aguiar, Francisca das Chagas do Amaral Souza
Food and Nutrition Sciences (FNS) , 2015, DOI: 10.4236/fns.2015.610091
Abstract: Camu-camu (Myrciaria dubia (H.B.K.) Mc Vaugh) is a fruit native to the Amazon region and is considered the greatest natural source of vitamin C worldwide. It is also a promising source of many phenolic compounds, including flavonoids and anthocyanins. Given the growing rates of chronic non-communicable diseases such as dyslipidemia, obesity and diabetesworldwide, freeze-dried camu-camu can be used for its functional properties, which can reduce the incidence of these diseases. Hence, the objective of this study was to produce freeze-dried camu-camu pulp and present it as an alternative functional food because of its high production and use potential, adding value to this fruit in particular, not very demanded by the food industry. Freeze-dried camu-camu pulp is a pink, homogeneous powder with great antioxidant capacity, 52,000 μmol TE/g, six times greater than freeze-dried acai powder. It is also very rich in vitamin C (20.31 g/100g), potassium (796.99 mg/100g), carbohydrates (47.00 g/100g), dietary fiber (19.23 g/100 g), many amino acids, other vitamins, and anthocyanins (0.739 mg/g). The camu-camu freeze-drying process is an effective alternative way to preserve the fruit, preserving its macronutrient and vitamin C contents. Camu-camu is also an excellent source of other bioactive compounds, such as minerals and other phenolic compounds. In conclusion, camu-camu can be used to introduce bioactive compounds into food products and to delay or prevent many human diseases.
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