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Search Results: 1 - 10 of 47 matches for " ducks "
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Study of Depletion and Contamination Profile of Dioxins in Duck Intensive Production  [PDF]
Miguel Cardo, Fernando Bernardo
Journal of Environmental Protection (JEP) , 2016, DOI: 10.4236/jep.2016.713160
Abstract: During 2016, following the implementation of a dioxin contamination monitoring in poultry meat (ducks) in a slaughterhouse, a positive sample was found. The investigation identified the wood shavings used as bedding material in the duck farm as the possible source of contamination of these animals. In this episode, contamination profiles of higher and lower concentrations, seem to be very similar, being OCDD, OCDF and 1,2,3,4,6,7,8-HpCDD responsible for 74.4% of the total contamination of those animals. The study revealed a reduction of poultry contamination after the removal of the source of contamination, with an average daily depletion percentage level ranging between 1.43% and 4.35%.
Caracterización molecular del pato criollo colombiano en cuatro departamentos
Hernández,Darwin; Mu?oz,Diana; Valencia,Néstor; Posso,Andrés; Mu?oz,Jaime E;
Acta Agronómica , 2007,
Abstract: 53 individuals of muscovy ducks from caldas, risaralda, antioquia and valle del cauca departments with three primers rams were evaluated. 71 polymorphic loci (61,2%) were generated with 0.19 of heterocigozity. the primer with the highest heterocigozity was cga (0.23) and ca had the highest polymorphic loci (76.1%). the rams technique allowed to discriminate anas and cairina genus with an index of similarity of 0.83. at a 0.894 of similarity index, the muscovy ducks formed 5 groups. the best primer to discriminate species was cca (fst= 0.274). the genetic differentiation was moderate (fst= 0.2045).
Comparative Evaluation of the Effects of Velogenic Newcastle Disease Virus Infection on the Hematology of Ducks and Chickens  [PDF]
Chekwube Paul Eze, John Osita Arinze Okoye, Innocent Okonkwo Ogbonna, Wilfred Sunday Ezema, Didacus Chukwuemeka Eze, Emmanuel Chukwudi Okwor, Christian Okorie-Kanu, Kalu Idika Idika
Open Journal of Veterinary Medicine (OJVM) , 2014, DOI: 10.4236/ojvm.2014.46013
Abstract:

The hematological lesions consequent upon velogenic Newcastle disease virus (NDV) infection were investigated in 6-week-old ducks and chickens. Following intramuscular inoculation, the results indicated significantly lower (p < 0.05) packed cell volume (PCV) in infected chickens (IC) on days 3 - 9 post inoculation (PI) and in infected ducks (ID) on days 3 - 15 PI. The hemoglobin concentrations were significantly lower (p < 0.05) in IC on days 3, 6 and 15 PI while in the ID, they were significantly lower (p < 0.05) on days 3, 9 and 15 PI. The total erythrocyte counts were significantly lower (p < 0.05) in IC on days 3, 9 and 15 PI and in ID, they were significantly lower (p < 0.05) on days 3 and 9 PI. The mean corpuscular values indicated macrocytic hypochromic anemia in IC and macrocytic normochromic anemia in ID. The leucogram showed leucopenia in IC and initial leucopenia followed by leucocytosis in ID. The hematological pictures of the velogenic NDV in this experiment indicate less susceptibility of ducks when compared with the chickens. The severity of this virus infection in chickens and the mild clinical signs and lesions presented by ducks showed that ducks are far less susceptible than chickens.

METHODS FOR CAECECTOMY OF MUSCOVY DUCKS REGARDING BALANCE EXPERIMENTS OF DIGESTIBILIY ESTABLISHING II. RECOVERY PERIOD
Dimo PENKOV,Hristo HRISTEV,Rumjana Ivanova,Tinka Hristova
Journal of Central European Agriculture , 2007,
Abstract: Some indexes of the recovery period of Muscovy ducklings after caecectomy have been studied. It’ established, that the birds recover the water intake 9 hours, the excreting- 12-15 hours after and the feed consumption (by food offering 24 hours after operation) – 72-90 hours after the operation.
Estudo do sistema portal hepático no pato doméstico (Cairina moshata)
PINTO, Marcos Rogério Alves;RIBEIRO, Antonio Augusto Coppi Maciel;SOUZA, Wilson Machado de;MIGLINO, Maria Angélica;MACHADO, Márcia Rita Fernandes;
Brazilian Journal of Veterinary Research and Animal Science , 1999, DOI: 10.1590/S1413-95961999000400001
Abstract: in this research a study on the course of the portal hepatic system in 30 adult domestic ducks, male and female was performed. the portal venous system consists of two portal hepatic veins: right and left. the left portal hepatic vein is formed by left gastric veins (in a number varying from 1 to 2), veins from the ventral margin of the gizzard, piloric vein and caudal proventricular vein. the right portal hepatic vein is formed by the caudal mesenteric vein, cranial mesenteric vein, proventricular-spleenic vein and gastro-pancreatic-duodenal vein. the mesenteric caudal vein takes in tributaries from the mesorectum, cloaca and ileo-cecum-colic junction. the cranial mesenteric vein takes in jejunal tributaries (in number varying from 12 to 21) and forms anastomosys with the caudal mesenteric vein, which results in the common mesenteric vein. the pancreatic-duodenal vein receives two right gastric veins, this way forming the gastro-pancreatic-duodenal vein. the proventricular-spleenic vein is formed by the dorsal and right proventricular vein and by the spleenic veins.
Genotyping of Salmonella strains isolated from ducks, their rearing and processing environments in Penang, Malaysia, using RAPD
Frederick Adzitey,Gulam Rusul Rahmat Ali,Nurul Huda,Rosma Ahmad
3 Biotech , 2013, DOI: 10.1007/s13205-013-0115-7
Abstract: Salmonella species are important foodborne pathogens that can cause illness and death in humans. The objective of this study was to determine the genetic relatedness of 115 Salmonella strains isolated from ducks and their environment using random amplified polymorphic deoxyribonucleic acid (RAPD). The analysis of Salmonella strains by RAPD produced DNA fingerprints of different sizes for differentiation purposes, and cluster analysis at a coefficient of 0.85 grouped the Salmonella strains into various clusters and singletons. S. Typhimurium were grouped into nine clusters and ten singletons, S. Hadar were grouped into seven clusters and nine singletons, S. Enteritidis were grouped into four clusters and five singletons, S. Braenderup were grouped into five clusters and four singletons, S. Albany were grouped into two clusters and seven singletons, and S. Derby were grouped into two clusters and four singletons at a coefficient of 0.85 with discriminatory index (D) ranging from 0.879 to 0.957. With the exception of S. Typhimurium strains which were grouped into three major groups (genotypes) by RAPD analysis, the rest were grouped into two major genotypes. RAPD was a useful genotyping tool for determining the genetic relatedness of the duck Salmonella strains. Comparison of the genetic relatedness among foodborne pathogens and their sources of isolation are important to trace their source and possibly the source of human infection.
Genetic Diversity of Escherichia coli Isolated from Ducks and the Environment Using Enterobacterial Repetitive Intergenic Consensus
Frederick Adzitey
Pakistan Journal of Biological Sciences , 2013,
Abstract: Escherichia coli are mostly free living bacteria that harbour the gastrointestinal tract of poultry. Howbeit, pathogenic Escherichia coli are very important foodborne pathogens that can cause severe complications, illnesses and deaths in humans. The objective of this study was to determine the genetic diversity or relatedness of 62 Escherichia coli strains isolated from ducks and the environment using Enterobacterial Repetitive Intergenic Consensus (ERIC). The analysis of the Escherichia coli strains by ERIC produced DNA bands of different sizes for differentiation purposes and cluster analysis at a coefficient of 0.85 grouped the strains into different clusters and singletons. At this coefficient the Escherichia coli strains were grouped into thirteen clusters and eleven singletons with discriminatory index (D value) of 0.946. The ERIC PCR adapted in this study showed to be a useful genotyping tool for determining the genetic relatedness of the duck Escherichia coli strains. Comparison of the genetic relatedness among foodborne pathogens is important for foodborne diseases outbreak investigations.
Molecular characterization of the Colombian creole duck in four departments Caracterización molecular del pato criollo colombiano en cuatro departamentos
Hernandez Darwin,Mu?oz Diana,Valencia Néstor,Posso Terranova Andrés Mauricio
Acta Agronómica , 2007,
Abstract: 53 individuals of Muscovy ducks from Caldas, Risaralda, Antioquia and Valle del Cauca departments with three primers RAMs were evaluated. 71 polymorphic loci (61,2%) were generated with 0.19 of heterocigozity. The primer with the highest heterocigozity was CGA (0.23) and CA had the highest polymorphic loci (76.1%). The RAMs technique allowed to discriminate Anas and Cairina genus with an index of similarity of 0.83. At a 0.894 of similarity index, the Muscovy ducks formed 5 groups. The best primer to discriminate species was CCA (Fst= 0.274). The genetic differentiation was moderate (Fst= 0.2045). Se evaluaron 53 individuos de patos Muscovy de los departamentos de Caldas, Risaralda, Antioquia y Valle del Cauca con tres cebadores RAMs. Se generaron 71 loci polimórficos (61.2%) con 0.19 de heterocigosidad. El cebador con mayor heterocigosidad fue CGA (0.23) y CA el de mayor loci polimórfico (76.1%). La técnica RAMs permitió diferenciar los géneros Anas y Cairina a un índice de similitud de 0.83. Con un índice de similitud del 0.894, los patos Muscovy formaron cinco grupos. El mejor cebador para diferenciar especies fue CCA (Fst= 0.274). La diferenciación genética en la muestra poblacional fue moderada (Fst= 0.2045).
Characterization of Poultry Production Systems in Vietnam
S. Burgos,P. T. Hong Hanh,D. Roland-Holst,S. A. Burgos
International Journal of Poultry Science , 2007,
Abstract: Poultry raising in Vietnam is widespread and common to smallholder farmers that keep chickens and ducks as a source of cheap animal protein and to derive income from the sale of eggs, meat and live birds. Three systems of poultry production are described: 1) traditional, extensive backyard/household poultry production, 2) semi-intensive, small to medium scale, market-oriented, commercial poultry production and 3) intensive, large scale, industrial poultry production.
Effect of Different Levels of Seaweed in Starter and Finisher Diets in Pellet and Mash Form on Performance and Carcass Quality of Ducks
A.A. El-Deekx,A. Mervat Brikaa
International Journal of Poultry Science , 2009,
Abstract: Two trials were run to assess the nutritional value of seaweed as a feedstuff in starter and finisher diets for ducks. The first trial (starter period): 96, one-day old commercial ducks were weighed, wing banded and randomly distributed to battery brooders into 8 treatment groups (3 replicates x 4 ducks each). The ducks were fed the experimental diets contained 0, 4, 8 and 12% seaweed, the diets were offered ad-libitum in pellet and mash form from one day to 5 wks of age. The second trial (finisher period): 160 commercial ducklings (35 days of age) were weighed; leg banded and distributed to 16 treatment groups of ten ducks each. The ducks were fed the experimental diets contained 0, 5, 10 and 15% seaweed, the diets were offered ad-libitum in pellet and mash form from 35-63 days of age. Results of trial 1 indicate that there were no significant differences in Feed Intake (FI), Feed Conversion Ratio (FCR) due to inclusion of seaweed up to 12% in starter diet either in mash or pellet form. In general, ducks given pelleted diets utilized feed more efficiently than those given the mash one. Results of trial 2 reveal that seaweed can be included up to 15% into ducks finisher diets either in pellet or mash form without adversely affecting growth and FCR. The relative weight of dressing, liver, gizzard, thigh muscles and breast muscles were not significantly affected by including up to 15% of seaweed in finisher duck diets. Seaweed at 5 and 10% in the finisher duck diets significantly increased the relative weight of breast muscles. Seaweed up to 15% in duck diet significantly improved the texture of breast muscles and 5 and 10% seaweed improved the texture of thigh muscles. There were no significant differences in the aroma, taste, juiciness and color of meat due to seaweed up to 15% in duck diets. In conclusion, seaweed can be used in starter and finisher duck diets up to 12% and 15%, respectively, without adversely affecting growth performance and carcass quality.
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