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Search Results: 1 - 10 of 325 matches for " buried pediment plains "
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Role of Satellite Sensors in Groundwater Exploration
Saumitra Mukherjee
Sensors , 2008, DOI: 10.3390/s8032006
Abstract: Spatial as well as spectral resolution has a very important role to play in water resource management. It was a challenge to explore the groundwater and rainwater harvesting sites in the Aravalli Quartzite-Granite-Pegmatite Precambrian terrain of Delhi, India. Use of only panchromatic sensor data of IRS-1D satellite with 5.8-meter spatial resolution has the potential to infer lineaments and faults in this hard rock area. It is essential to identify the location of interconnected lineaments below buried pediment plains in the hard rock area for targeting sub-surface water resources. Linear Image Self Scanning sensor data of the same satellite with 23.5-meter resolution when merged with the panchromatic data has produced very good results in delineation of interconnected lineaments over buried pediment plains as vegetation anomaly. These specific locations of vegetation anomaly were detected as dark red patches in various hard rock areas of Delhi. Field investigation was carried out on these patches by resistivity and magnetic survey in parts of Jawaharlal Nehru University (JNU), Indira Gandhi national Open University, Research and Referral Hospital and Humayuns Tomb areas. Drilling was carried out in four locations of JNU that proved to be the most potential site with ground water discharge ranging from 20,000 to 30,000 liters per hour with 2 to 4 meters draw down. Further the impact of urbanization on groundwater recharging in the terrain was studied by generating Normalized difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) map which was possible to generate by using the LISS-III sensor of IRS-1D satellite. Selection of suitable sensors has definitely a cutting edge on natural resource exploration and management including groundwater.
Role of Satellite Sensors in Groundwater Exploration
Saumitra Mukherjee
Sensors , 2008,
Abstract: Spatial as well as spectral resolution has a very important role to play in water resource management. It was a challenge to explore the groundwater and rainwater harvesting sites in the Aravalli Quartzite-Granite-Pegmatite Precambrian terrain of Delhi, India. Use of only panchromatic sensor data of IRS-1D satellite with 5.8-meter spatial resolution has the potential to infer lineaments and faults in this hard rock area. It is essential to identify the location of interconnected lineaments below buried pediment plains in the hard rock area for targeting sub-surface water resources. Linear Image Self Scanning sensor data of the same satellite with 23.5-meter resolution when merged with the panchromatic data has produced very good results in delineation of interconnected lineaments over buried pediment plains as vegetation anomaly. These specific locations of vegetation anomaly were detected as dark red patches in various hard rock areas of Delhi. Field investigation was carried out on these patches by resistivity and magnetic survey in parts of Jawaharlal Nehru University (JNU), Indira Gandhi national Open University, Research and Referral Hospital and Humayuns Tomb areas. Drilling was carried out in four locations of JNU that proved to be the most potential site with ground water discharge ranging from 20,000 to 30,000 liters per hour with 2 to 4 meters draw down. Further the impact of urbanization on groundwater recharging in the terrain was studied by generating Normalized difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) map which was possible to generate by using the LISS-III sensor of IRS-1D satellite. Selection of suitable sensors has definitely a cutting edge on natural resource exploration and management including groundwater.
Comment on planation surface
Zhiju Cui,Dewen Li,Yongqiu Wu,Gengnian Liu
Chinese Science Bulletin , 1999, DOI: 10.1007/BF02884913
Abstract: Planation surfaces includes peneplain, pediment and etchplain, which differ from each other in formation and distribution. The double leveling surfaces theory offered by Budel can be used to explain the landforms in limestone areas. According to Budel, that the residue is the upper layer of a planation surface is very important in studying the formation environment and weathering crust deposit in planation. In recent years, some researchers have expresses doubt whether it is reliable to use fossils to interpret the rising amount and rate of rise of the Tibet Plateau. It is believed that the primary planation surface can be used as a reliable indicator of land rising.
Drought and Associated Impacts in the Great Plains of the United States—A Review  [PDF]
Jeffrey B. Basara, Joanna N. Maybourn, Casey M. Peirano, Jennifer E. Tate, Parker J. Brown, Jake D. Hoey, Brandon R. Smith
International Journal of Geosciences (IJG) , 2013, DOI: 10.4236/ijg.2013.46A2009
Abstract:

The Great Plains region of the United States is susceptible to drought of all kinds including meteorological/climatological, agricultural, hydrological, and socioeconomic. Drought conditions in the region span varying spatial and temporal scales and the causes include: 1) certain synoptic conditions that favor drought such as mid-tropospheric ridging over the drought-affected area and a weak low-level jet; 2) sea surface temperature anomalies and associated teleconnections; 3) land-atmosphere coupling; and 4) anthropogenic effects. While drought can span as few as a couple of months, the most severe droughts can occur at the decadal scale such as the 1930s Dust Bowl, the worst drought in recent history from a societal standpoint. Such droughts in the Great Plains have widespread impacts on agriculture, water resources, human health, and the economy.

Development of a pediment on western slopes of Liupan Mountain related to the Neotectonic Uplift
Dong Yang,Xiaomin Fang,Yougui Song,Lianqing Lu,Jijun Li
Chinese Science Bulletin , 2001, DOI: 10.1007/BF03187229
Abstract: The late Cenozoic uplift of Qinghai-Xizang Plateau plays an important role in adjacent geomorphic evolution and depositional environments. Liupan Mountain, located at the northeast margin of Qinghai-Xizang Plateau, has different landforms on the east and west sides. Recently, a pediment, which lies above the highest terrace of the Yellow River at the northeast edge of Longzhong Basin, has been described. The paleomagnetic measurements indicate that the pediment had developed at least 1.8 MaBP and its age is in accordance with that of the peneplains near Lanzhou and Linxia, in the southwest of Longzhong Basin. The results suggest that the Longzhong Basin lying to the west of Liupan Mountain had been subject to erosion and developed an extensive pediment; this pediment is named the Gansu Period Peneplain. It also indicates that Qinghai-Xizang Plateau and Liupan Mountain were uplifted strongly at that time, which caused not only the end of pediplanation but also Yellow River appearance and loess accumulation.
The Relationship Between Lithology and Slope Morphology in the Tucson Mountains, Arizona.
Kamel Khanchoul,Robert Altschul
Anuário do Instituto de Geociências , 2008,
Abstract: The relationship between lithology and slope morphology is investigated at eight sites on granitic, andesitic, andsedimentary hillslopes in the Tucson Mountains, Arizona. Several methods are used in the study. Topographic profi lesare constructed. Skewness indices, slope length, and mean slope angles of the different slope profi les are computed andcompared with each other. Debris size analysis has permitted for some profi les, the determination of hillfront/piedmontjunctions. The nature and structural characteristics of the bedrock are the ones that determine the hillslope morphologyin this semi-arid region. There are, as a matter of fact, variations in profi les on the same bedrock nature but differentlyexposed. More precise morphologic studies have been also done in comparing the different lithologic pairs. They havepermitted to show some similarities in shapes. The granitic-andesitic slopes and andesiic-sedimentary slopes are thebest comparisons which show the relationship between lithology and slope morphology. The granitic-sedimentary sloperelationship is shown in the hillfront concavities, mountain front and piedmont mean slope angles.
Variabilidad espacial de los atributos de la capa arable de un Inceptisol del piedemonte de la cordillera Oriental (Casanare, Colombia)
Pe?a,Ricardo; Rubiano,Yolanda; Pe?a,Andrés; Chaves,Bernardo;
Agronomía Colombiana , 2009,
Abstract: with the aim of optimizing future samplings in similar soils, the present work studied spatial variability of soil attributes in a 58 ha plot in the municipality of tauramena, department of casanare, in the colombian orinoquia. located at an alluvial fan terrace of the eastern mountain range, the studied soil is an oxic dystrudept with loamy sand to clay loam texture. the optimal sampling distance for each studied variable was calculated by means of a semivariogram analysis and a nested analysis of variance. no difference between the calculated optimal distances was found with either method when the variance of the specified attribute was spatial dependent.
The Kansas Anthropologist Reminlscence Project for Senior Plains Anthropologists
Marlin F. Hawley
Bulletin of the History of Archaeology , 1998, DOI: 10.5334/bha.08205
Abstract: Remember the days of old, consider the years of many generations, ask thy father and he will show thee, thy elders, and they will tell thee. Deuteronomy 32: 7 For the past six years, The Kansas Anthropologist has published an ongoing series of reminiscences or retrospective articles by senior Great Plains archaeologists. The aim of the project is to collect reminiscences from senior anthro-pologists regarding their experiences in pre-and post-World War II Plains archaeology, biological anthropology, and ethnology. The historian John Lukacs (1966:x) once offered an elegant and concise comment on the value of history, one that I offer here: "I believe that history, as a form of thought, is one of the most precious and perhaps unique rational posssessions of Western civilizations. The character of a person may appear best from the reconstruc-tion of the history of his life; the same is true of the character of nations. The very history of a prob-lem may reveal its essential diagnosis. There is no human endeavor that may not be approached and studied profitably through its history." Fortunately, there hardly needs to be a justification anymore for such a project, as is attested by the recent prolifera-tion of research into the history of archaeology and anthropology on virtually a global scale. The intention of these retrospective articles is not to explore or diagnose any particular problem but rather to create a mosaic of first person narrratives informed by personal experience and illustrated with photos and anecdotes to illuminate the development of Plains anthropology in the 20th Century.
Growth and Yield of Guar (Cyamopsis tetragonoloba L.) Genotypes under Different Planting Dates in the Semi-Arid Southern High Plains  [PDF]
Sudhir Singla, Kulbhushan Grover, Sangamesh V. Angadi, Sultan H. Begna, Brian Schutte, Dawn Van Leeuwen
American Journal of Plant Sciences (AJPS) , 2016, DOI: 10.4236/ajps.2016.78120
Abstract: Guar is a drought and salt tolerant summer annual legume, which could be a potential alternative crop in the semi-arid Southern High Plains. Increased use of guar gum in oil industries has increased the demand of guar globally. Planting date effects on stand establishment, physiological parameters, and yield formation of guar genotypes were investigated at the New Mexico State University’s Agricultural Science Center at Clovis, NM for two seasons (2014 and 2015). Four guar genotypes (HES 1123, Kinman, Lewis, and Matador) were tested under three planting dates (June 18, July 7, and July 22 in 2014; and June 18, July 6, and July 20 in 2015). Higher temperature and rainfall were recorded under mid-June planting than early-July and late-July plantings. Guar planted under mid-June had better stand establishment as shown by the higher number of plants m-2, better physiology as revealed by higher photosynthetic rate (Pn), transpiration rate (Tr), leaf area index (LAI), and SPAD values than early-July and late-July plantings. Guar planted under mid-June resulted in taller plants, and therefore, produced higher plant biomass than both of the July plantings. Yield attributing characteristics including clusters plant-1, pods plant-1, seeds plant-1, seed spod-1, 1000 seed weight, and harvest index (HI) were highest under mid-June planting followed by the early-July and late-July plantings, respectively. The mid-June planting increased seed yield by 26% and 55% over early-July and late-July (1399 vs. 1111 and 903 kg·ha-1) plantings,
Irrigation Termination Thermal Time and Amount on Cotton Lint Yield and Fiber Quality  [PDF]
Robert J. Lascano, R. Louis Baumhardt, Timothy S. Goebel, Jeffrey T. Baker, Dennis C. Gitz III
Open Journal of Soil Science (OJSS) , 2017, DOI: 10.4236/ojss.2017.79016
Abstract: Cotton irrigation in the Texas High Plains (THP) is often dictated by the well capacity and not by the water needs of the crop. The source of irrigation-water is the Ogallala aquifer and in many areas of the THP, the water table has declined to well capacities that deliver 1.3 to >7.6 mm/d. There is plenty of information on cotton responses to irrigation frequency and amount; however, information on when to terminate irrigation and its effect on cotton lint yield and fiber quality is scarce. Our objective was to evaluate over a 4-year period three irrigation termination thermal times corresponding to cumulative daily heat units (∑HU) of 890 °C, 1000 °C and 1110 °C from crop emergence, and three levels of irrigation (2.5, 5.1 and 7.6 mm/d) on cotton lint yield and fiber quality. Irrigation was applied with a sprinkler system on a 3-day frequency in Lubbock, TX. Results showed that on average the 7.6 mm/d level produced the most cotton lint yield regardless of the irrigation termination thermal time. Terminating cotton at 1000- °C ∑HU resulted in water savings of 25 to 50 mm for the 2.5 and 5.1 mm/d levels without significantly affecting lint yield. For the 7.6 mm/d and terminating at 890- °C ∑HU resulted in water savings of 100 to 115 mm. Average fiber length statistically increased with termination thermal time and level. This effect was most significant in years with the least rain and warmer air temperature. Micronaire increased with the termination thermal time in years with >500 mm of rain. Average fiber length uniformity and fiber strength were minimally affected by termination thermal time. As irrigation level increased, the average micronaire decreased, and fiber strength increased for the 5.1 and 7.6 mm/d irrigation. We concluded that in the THP for well capacities that deliver 2.5 - 5.1 mm/d irrigation can be terminated when the ∑HU reaches about 1000 °C from emergence without impacting cotton lint yield.
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