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Search Results: 1 - 10 of 208866 matches for " and Stacey L. Vye "
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Advising Practices: A Survey of Self-Access Learner Motivations and Preferences
Leander S. Hughes, Nathan P. Krug, and Stacey L. Vye
Studies in Self-Access Learning Journal , 2012,
Abstract: Based on queries from students who frequently visit the English Resource Center (ERC) at Saitama University, this research team set out to examine what motivational factors encourage ERC attendees to participate for an extended period of time in the Center on a regular basis. Initial indications are that social collaborative learning amongst peers at the Center is the most significant long-term motivational factor for students to become involved with learning English in the ERC. More specifically, this study explores factors that encourage these learners to become regular and perhaps more autonomous center participants in terms of advising practices such as (a) what factors led students to their initial discovery of ERC, (b) what inspired that very first visit, (c) what encouraged learners to continue to attend the Center on a regular basis, (d) what attendees value about the ERC, and finally (e) what might be done to ensure that greater support is provided for students who come to the ERC for the first time.
Growth of an Out-of-Class Learning Community through Autonomous Socialization at a Self-Access Centre
Leander S. Hughes,Nathan P. Krug,Stacey Vye
Studies in Self-Access Learning Journal , 2011,
Abstract: This study investigates the benefits of attending the Saitama University English Resource Center (ERC), a self-access center for English language learning open to all students at the university and managed by full-time faculty who alternate as center advisors. The study builds on previous research to explore how advisors promote language learning through facilitating autonomous socialization in the L2 among center attendees. This authentic social interaction not only exposes learners to patterns of discourse and other language input unavailable to learners in most institutional settings, it has also served as the means through which visiting students have formed an out-of-class learning community that now extends well beyond the center’s walls. Findings of a significant increase in center attendees and meaningful gains in the number of frequent attendees over the past year provide evidence that supports informal observations of the growth of this extraordinary L2-based community.
Rethinking State, Civil Society and Citizen Participation. The Case of the Colombian Paramilitaries
Stacey L.Hunt
Behemoth : a Journal on Civilisation , 2009,
Abstract: Throughout Latin America, processes of democratization have coincided with increasing levels of violent crime, the privatization of justice and security, and widespread support for heavy-handed policing. The Colombian paramilitaries are perhaps the most notorious case of brutal violence committed against civilians with general support from both state and society. The article explores the surprising amalgam of actors of which the paramilitaries are comprised. It illustrates the way in which their development was shrouded in and facilitated by legal ambiguity, and distinguish their war tactic of targeting the civilians from the guerrilla’s strategy. Finally, it discusses the political success of the paramilitaries in terms of their land and wealth consolidation, their insertion into the political science, and their legal demobilization. It is suggested to conceive paramilitary violence not merely as havoc wrecked in the margins of the state, but as a central component of contemporary governance.
Does the routine use of global coronary heart disease risk scores translate into clinical benefits or harms? A systematic review of the literature
Stacey L Sheridan, Eric Crespo
BMC Health Services Research , 2008, DOI: 10.1186/1472-6963-8-60
Abstract: We searched MEDLINE (1966 through June 13, 2007) for articles relevant to our review. Using predefined inclusion and exclusion criteria, we included studies of any design that provided physicians with global risk scores or allowed them to calculate scores themselves, and then measured clinical benefits and/or harms. Two reviewers reviewed potentially relevant studies for inclusion and resolved disagreement by consensus. Data from each article was then abstracted into an evidence table by one reviewer and the quality of evidence was assessed independently by two reviewers.11 studies met criteria for inclusion in our review. Six studies addressed clinical benefits and 5 addressed clinical harms. Six studies were rated as "fair" quality and the others were deemed "methodologically limited". Two fair quality studies showed that physician knowledge of global CHD risk is associated with increased prescription of cardiovascular drugs in high risk (but not all) patients. Two additional fair quality studies showed no effect on their primary outcomes, but one was underpowered and the other focused on prescribing of lifestyle changes, rather than drugs whose prescribing might be expected to be targeted by risk level. One of these aforementioned studies showed improved blood pressure in high-risk patients, but no improvement in the proportion of patients at high risk, perhaps due to the high proportion of participants with baseline risks significantly exceeding the risk threshold. Two fair quality studies found no evidence of harm from patient knowledge of global risk scores when they were accompanied by counseling, and optional or scheduled follow-up. Other studies were too methodologically limited to draw conclusions.Our review provides preliminary evidence that physicians' knowledge of global CHD risk scores may translate into modestly increased prescribing of cardiovascular drugs and modest short-term reductions in CHD risk factors without clinical harm. Whether these resul
Fourier Decompositions of Loop Bundles
Ralph L. Cohen,Andrew Stacey
Mathematics , 2002,
Abstract: In this paper we investigate bundles whose structure group is the loop group LU(n). Our main result is to give a necessary and sufficient criterion for there to exist a Fourier type decomposition of such a bundle $\xi$. This is essentially a decomposition of $\xi$ as $\zeta \otimes L\mathbb C$, where $\zeta$ is a finite dimensional subbundle of $\xi$ and $L\mathbb C$ is the loop space of the complex numbers. The criterion is a reduction of the structure group to the finite rank unitary group U(n) viewed as the subgroup of LU(n) consisting of constant loops. Next we study the case where $\xi$ is the loop space of an $n$ dimensional bundle $\zeta \to M$. The tangent bundle of $LM$ is such a bundle. We then show how to twist such a bundle by elements of the automorphism group of the pull back of $\zeta$ over $LM$ via the map $LM \to M$ that evaluates a loop at a basepoint. Given a connection on $\zeta$, we view the associated parallel transport operator as an element of this gauge group and show that twisting the loop bundle by such an operator satisfies the criterion and admits a Fourier decomposition.
A Review of Psychosocial Risk Factors for Pediatric Atopy
Christina L. Duncan,Stacey L. Simon
Journal of Allergy , 2012, DOI: 10.1155/2012/821849
Abstract: Pediatric atopy is increasing in prevalence and creates a significant financial and quality of life burden for children and families (e.g., frequent clinic visits, academic, and social challenges). Thus, it is important to understand modifiable risk factors related to disease onset or exacerbation in young children. The existing research base suggests that while a genetic link has been identified, specific family psychological factors (e.g., parent stress) also appear to play a significant role in the development of pediatric atopy. The function of psychological stress in the clinical expression and exacerbation of allergic diseases in young children is hypothesized to be due to neuroendocrine and immunologic systems. Specifically, stress-related activation of the sympathetic and adrenomedullary (SAM) system as well as the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical (HPA) axis from both the intrauterine environment and early childhood experiences may increase risk of childhood atopy above and beyond genetic risk. Consequently, prevention and intervention strategies aimed at reducing children’s early exposure to stress and psychological difficulties in parents may prove beneficial in preventing or reducing the likelihood that their children will develop atopy. 1. Introduction Pediatric atopy is increasingly prevalent and represents a significant financial and quality of life burden for children and families [1]. In addition to significant morbidity, effects of disease and its treatment, such as fatigue and discomfort as well as frequent clinic visits, may result in academic and social challenges for youth with atopy. Thus, it is extremely important to try to understand modifiable risk factors related to disease onset or exacerbation in young children. While a genetic link has been identified, the contributing role of family psychological factors, particularly parent stress, is beginning to be explored in the literature. This relationship is predominantly correlational in nature, and the mechanisms involved are largely unknown but have been hypothesized. The role of parent stress in relation to pediatric allergic sensitization or development of allergic disease in early childhood and a hypothesized underlying psychoneuroimmunological theory are discussed. 2. Parent-Report of Family Stress in Early Childhood Early psychosocial factors can play a role in disease development later in childhood. In a cohort of youth, family stress early in life (ages 9–24 months) was associated with asthma status at 4 years of age [2]. However, parent stress was highly correlated
Circadian Phase Has Profound Effects on Differential Expression Analysis
Polly Yingshan Hsu, Stacey L. Harmer
PLOS ONE , 2012, DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0049853
Abstract: Circadian rhythms are physiological and behavioral cycles with a period of approximately 24 hours that are generated by an endogenous clock, or oscillator. Found in diverse organisms, they are precisely controlled and provide growth and fitness benefits. Numerous microarray studies examining circadian control of gene expression have reported that a substantial fraction of the genomes of many organisms is clock-controlled. Here we show that a long-period mutant in Arabidopsis, rve8-1, has a global alteration in phase of all clock-controlled genes. After several days in constant environmental conditions, at which point the mutant and control plants have very different circadian phases, we found 1557 genes to be differentially expressed in rve8-1, almost all of which are clock-regulated. However, after adjusting for this phase difference, only a handful show overall expression level differences between rve8-1 and wild type. Thus the apparent differential expression is mainly due to the phase difference between these two genotypes. These findings prompted us to examine the effect of phase on gene expression within a single genotype. Using samples of wild-type plants harvested at thirty-minute intervals, we demonstrated that even this small difference in circadian phase significantly influences the results of differential expression analysis. Our study demonstrates the robust influence of the circadian clock on the transcriptome and provides a cautionary note for all biologists performing genome-level expression analysis.
The Circadian Clock Regulates Auxin Signaling and Responses in Arabidopsis
Michael F. Covington,Stacey L. Harmer
PLOS Biology , 2012, DOI: 10.1371/journal.pbio.0050222
Abstract: The circadian clock plays a pervasive role in the temporal regulation of plant physiology, environmental responsiveness, and development. In contrast, the phytohormone auxin plays a similarly far-reaching role in the spatial regulation of plant growth and development. Went and Thimann noted 70 years ago that plant sensitivity to auxin varied according to the time of day, an observation that they could not explain. Here we present work that explains this puzzle, demonstrating that the circadian clock regulates auxin signal transduction. Using genome-wide transcriptional profiling, we found many auxin-induced genes are under clock regulation. We verified that endogenous auxin signaling is clock regulated with a luciferase-based assay. Exogenous auxin has only modest effects on the plant clock, but the clock controls plant sensitivity to applied auxin. Notably, we found both transcriptional and growth responses to exogenous auxin are gated by the clock. Thus the circadian clock regulates some, and perhaps all, auxin responses. Consequently, many aspects of plant physiology not previously thought to be under circadian control may show time-of-day–specific sensitivity, with likely important consequences for plant growth and environmental responses.
The Circadian Clock Regulates Auxin Signaling and Responses in Arabidopsis
Michael F Covington,Stacey L Harmer
PLOS Biology , 2007, DOI: 10.1371/journal.pbio.0050222
Abstract: The circadian clock plays a pervasive role in the temporal regulation of plant physiology, environmental responsiveness, and development. In contrast, the phytohormone auxin plays a similarly far-reaching role in the spatial regulation of plant growth and development. Went and Thimann noted 70 years ago that plant sensitivity to auxin varied according to the time of day, an observation that they could not explain. Here we present work that explains this puzzle, demonstrating that the circadian clock regulates auxin signal transduction. Using genome-wide transcriptional profiling, we found many auxin-induced genes are under clock regulation. We verified that endogenous auxin signaling is clock regulated with a luciferase-based assay. Exogenous auxin has only modest effects on the plant clock, but the clock controls plant sensitivity to applied auxin. Notably, we found both transcriptional and growth responses to exogenous auxin are gated by the clock. Thus the circadian clock regulates some, and perhaps all, auxin responses. Consequently, many aspects of plant physiology not previously thought to be under circadian control may show time-of-day–specific sensitivity, with likely important consequences for plant growth and environmental responses.
Establishment of topographic circuit zones in the cerebellum of scrambler mutant mice
Stacey L. Reeber,Roy V. Sillitoe
Frontiers in Neural Circuits , 2013, DOI: 10.3389/fncir.2013.00122
Abstract: The cerebellum is organized into zonal circuits that are thought to regulate ongoing motor behavior. Recent studies suggest that neuronal birthdates, gene expression patterning, and apoptosis control zone formation. Importantly, developing Purkinje cell zones are thought to provide the framework upon which afferent circuitry is organized. Yet, it is not clear whether altering the final placement of Purkinje cells affects the assembly of circuits into topographic zones. To gain insight into this problem, we examined zonal connectivity in scrambler mice; spontaneous mutants that have severe Purkinje cell ectopia due to the loss of reelin-disabled1 signaling. We used immunohistochemistry and neural tracing to determine whether displacement of Purkinje cell zones into ectopic positions triggers defects in zonal connectivity within sensory-motor circuits. Despite the abnormal placement of more than 95% of Purkinje cells in scrambler mice, the complementary relationship between molecularly distinct Purkinje cell zones is maintained, and consequently, afferents are targeted into topographic circuits. These data suggest that although loss of disabled1 distorts the Purkinje cell map, its absence does not obstruct the formation of zonal circuits. These findings support the hypothesis that Purkinje cell zones play an essential role in establishing afferent topography.
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