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Search Results: 1 - 10 of 2005 matches for " Yuko Sakai-Tagawa "
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Mutation Analysis of 2009 Pandemic Influenza A(H1N1) Viruses Collected in Japan during the Peak Phase of the Pandemic
Jean-étienne Morlighem,Shintaro Aoki,Mami Kishima,Mitsue Hanami,Chihiro Ogawa,Amadu Jalloh,Yukari Takahashi,Yuki Kawai,Satomi Saga,Eiji Hayashi,Toshiaki Ban,Shinyu Izumi,Akira Wada,Masayuki Mano,Megumu Fukunaga,Yoshiyuki Kijima,Masashi Shiomi,Kaoru Inoue,Takeshi Hata,Yukihiro Koretsune,Koichiro Kudo,Yuji Himeno,Aizan Hirai,Kazuo Takahashi,Yuko Sakai-Tagawa,Kiyoko Iwatsuki-Horimoto,Yoshihiro Kawaoka,Yoshihide Hayashizaki,Toshihisa Ishikawa
PLOS ONE , 2012, DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0018956
Abstract: Pandemic influenza A(H1N1) virus infection quickly circulated worldwide in 2009. In Japan, the first case was reported in May 2009, one month after its outbreak in Mexico. Thereafter, A(H1N1) infection spread widely throughout the country. It is of great importance to profile and understand the situation regarding viral mutations and their circulation in Japan to accumulate a knowledge base and to prepare clinical response platforms before a second pandemic (pdm) wave emerges.
Biological and Structural Characterization of a Host-Adapting Amino Acid in Influenza Virus
Shinya Yamada,Masato Hatta,Bart L. Staker,Shinji Watanabe,Masaki Imai,Kyoko Shinya,Yuko Sakai-Tagawa,Mutsumi Ito,Makoto Ozawa,Tokiko Watanabe,Saori Sakabe,Chengjun Li,Jin Hyun Kim,Peter J. Myler,Isabelle Phan,Amy Raymond,Eric Smith,Robin Stacy,Chairul A. Nidom,Simon M. Lank,Roger W. Wiseman,Benjamin N. Bimber,David H. O'Connor,Gabriele Neumann,Lance J. Stewart ,Yoshihiro Kawaoka
PLOS Pathogens , 2010, DOI: 10.1371/journal.ppat.1001034
Abstract: Two amino acids (lysine at position 627 or asparagine at position 701) in the polymerase subunit PB2 protein are considered critical for the adaptation of avian influenza A viruses to mammals. However, the recently emerged pandemic H1N1 viruses lack these amino acids. Here, we report that a basic amino acid at position 591 of PB2 can compensate for the lack of lysine at position 627 and confers efficient viral replication to pandemic H1N1 viruses in mammals. Moreover, a basic amino acid at position 591 of PB2 substantially increased the lethality of an avian H5N1 virus in mice. We also present the X-ray crystallographic structure of the C-terminus of a pandemic H1N1 virus PB2 protein. Arginine at position 591 fills the cleft found in H5N1 PB2 proteins in this area, resulting in differences in surface shape and charge for H1N1 PB2 proteins. These differences may affect the protein's interaction with viral and/or cellular factors, and hence its ability to support virus replication in mammals.
The HA and NS Genes of Human H5N1 Influenza A Virus Contribute to High Virulence in Ferrets
Hirotaka Imai,Kyoko Shinya,Ryo Takano,Maki Kiso,Yukiko Muramoto,Saori Sakabe,Shin Murakami,Mutsumi Ito,Shinya Yamada,Mai thi Quynh Le,Chairul A. Nidom,Yuko Sakai-Tagawa,Kei Takahashi,Yasuyuki Omori,Takeshi Noda,Masayuki Shimojima,Satoshi Kakugawa,Hideo Goto,Kiyoko Iwatsuki-Horimoto,Taisuke Horimoto,Yoshihiro Kawaoka
PLOS Pathogens , 2010, DOI: 10.1371/journal.ppat.1001106
Abstract: Highly pathogenic H5N1 influenza A viruses have spread across Asia, Europe, and Africa. More than 500 cases of H5N1 virus infection in humans, with a high lethality rate, have been reported. To understand the molecular basis for the high virulence of H5N1 viruses in mammals, we tested the virulence in ferrets of several H5N1 viruses isolated from humans and found A/Vietnam/UT3062/04 (UT3062) to be the most virulent and A/Vietnam/UT3028/03 (UT3028) to be avirulent in this animal model. We then generated a series of reassortant viruses between the two viruses and assessed their virulence in ferrets. All of the viruses that possessed both the UT3062 hemagglutinin (HA) and nonstructural protein (NS) genes were highly virulent. By contrast, all those possessing the UT3028 HA or NS genes were attenuated in ferrets. These results demonstrate that the HA and NS genes are responsible for the difference in virulence in ferrets between the two viruses. Amino acid differences were identified at position 134 of HA, at positions 200 and 205 of NS1, and at positions 47 and 51 of NS2. We found that the residue at position 134 of HA alters the receptor-binding property of the virus, as measured by viral elution from erythrocytes. Further, both of the residues at positions 200 and 205 of NS1 contributed to enhanced type I interferon (IFN) antagonistic activity. These findings further our understanding of the determinants of pathogenicity of H5N1 viruses in mammals.
One-Step Detection of the 2009 Pandemic Influenza A(H1N1) Virus by the RT-SmartAmp Assay and Its Clinical Validation
Yuki Kawai, Yasumasa Kimura, Alexander Lezhava, Hajime Kanamori, Kengo Usui, Takeshi Hanami, Takahiro Soma, Jean-étienne Morlighem, Satomi Saga, Yuri Ishizu, Shintaro Aoki, Ryuta Endo, Atsuko Oguchi-Katayama, Yasushi Kogo, Yasumasa Mitani, Takefumi Ishidao, Chiharu Kawakami, Hideshi Kurata, Yumiko Furuya, Takayuki Saito, Norio Okazaki, Masatsugu Chikahira, Eiji Hayashi, Sei-ichi Tsuruoka, Tokumichi Toguchi, Yoshitomo Saito, Toshiaki Ban, Shinyu Izumi, Hideko Uryu, Koichiro Kudo, Yuko Sakai-Tagawa, Yoshihiro Kawaoka, Aizan Hirai, Yoshihide Hayashizaki, Toshihisa Ishikawa
PLOS ONE , 2012, DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0030236
Abstract: Background In 2009, a pandemic (pdm) influenza A(H1N1) virus infection quickly circulated globally resulting in about 18,000 deaths around the world. In Japan, infected patients accounted for 16% of the total population. The possibility of human-to-human transmission of highly pathogenic novel influenza viruses is becoming a fear for human health and society. Methodology To address the clinical need for rapid diagnosis, we have developed a new method, the “RT-SmartAmp assay”, to rapidly detect the 2009 pandemic influenza A(H1N1) virus from patient swab samples. The RT-SmartAmp assay comprises both reverse transcriptase (RT) and isothermal DNA amplification reactions in one step, where RNA extraction and PCR reaction are not required. We used an exciton-controlled hybridization-sensitive fluorescent primer to specifically detect the HA segment of the 2009 pdm influenza A(H1N1) virus within 40 minutes without cross-reacting with the seasonal A(H1N1), A(H3N2), or B-type (Victoria) viruses. Results and Conclusions We evaluated the RT-SmartAmp method in clinical research carried out in Japan during a pandemic period of October 2009 to January 2010. A total of 255 swab samples were collected from outpatients with influenza-like illness at three hospitals and eleven clinics located in the Tokyo and Chiba areas in Japan. The 2009 pdm influenza A(H1N1) virus was detected by the RT-SmartAmp assay, and the detection results were subsequently compared with data of current influenza diagnostic tests (lateral flow immuno-chromatographic tests) and viral genome sequence analysis. In conclusion, by the RT-SmartAmp assay we could detect the 2009 pdm influenza A(H1N1) virus in patients' swab samples even in early stages after the initial onset of influenza symptoms. Thus, the RT-SmartAmp assay is considered to provide a simple and practical tool to rapidly detect the 2009 pdm influenza A(H1N1) virus.
24-hour intraocular pressure in glaucoma patients randomized to receive dorzolamide or brinzolamide in combination with latanoprost
Yoshimi Nakamura, Shusaku Ishikawa, Yuko Nakamura, Hiroshi Sakai, et al.
Clinical Ophthalmology , 2009, DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/OPTH.S5726
Abstract: ur intraocular pressure in glaucoma patients randomized to receive dorzolamide or brinzolamide in combination with latanoprost Original Research (5194) Total Article Views Authors: Yoshimi Nakamura, Shusaku Ishikawa, Yuko Nakamura, Hiroshi Sakai, et al. Published Date July 2009 Volume 2009:3 Pages 395 - 400 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/OPTH.S5726 Yoshimi Nakamura, Shusaku Ishikawa, Yuko Nakamura, Hiroshi Sakai, Ichiko Henzan, Shoichi Sawaguchi Department of Ophthalmology, University of the Ryukyus Faculty of Medicine, Okinawa, Japan Purpose: To investigate the efficacy of dorzolamide 1% (bid or tid) or brinzolamide 1% bid on 24-hour intraocular pressure (IOP) control as well as patients’ preference for either drug when added in combination with latanoprost against glaucoma (IOP, ≥18 mmHg). Methods: In this randomized crossover study patients were assigned to receive latanoprost plus either dorzolamide or brinzolamide for four weeks. Thereafter, patients underwent 24-hour IOP monitoring while continuing to receive dorzolamide (for two successive days/nights: at first bid then tid) or brinzolamide bid (once overnight). They were then switched over to receive the other test medication for a further four weeks and subsequently reexamined for 24-hour IOP. A questionnaire survey on treatment satisfaction was performed. Results: In 20 patients dorzolamide bid or tid or brinzolamide bid exerted significant (p < 0.001) reductions of IOP from baseline at all time-points over 24 hours; no difference was detected among the treatment regimens. Significantly (p < 0.05) more patients preferred dorzolamide (n = 9) over brinzolamide (n = 2), whereas nine patients gave a neutral answer. Conclusion: Dorzolamide bid or tid and brinzolamide bid when combined with latanoprost therapy elicited significant IOP reduction for 24 hours. It is rational to consider patients’ preference of therapeutic regimen especially long-term users such as those with glaucoma.
24-hour intraocular pressure in glaucoma patients randomized to receive dorzolamide or brinzolamide in combination with latanoprost
Yoshimi Nakamura,Shusaku Ishikawa,Yuko Nakamura,Hiroshi Sakai
Clinical Ophthalmology , 2009,
Abstract: Yoshimi Nakamura, Shusaku Ishikawa, Yuko Nakamura, Hiroshi Sakai, Ichiko Henzan, Shoichi SawaguchiDepartment of Ophthalmology, University of the Ryukyus Faculty of Medicine, Okinawa, JapanPurpose: To investigate the efficacy of dorzolamide 1% (bid or tid) or brinzolamide 1% bid on 24-hour intraocular pressure (IOP) control as well as patients’ preference for either drug when added in combination with latanoprost against glaucoma (IOP, ≥18 mmHg).Methods: In this randomized crossover study patients were assigned to receive latanoprost plus either dorzolamide or brinzolamide for four weeks. Thereafter, patients underwent 24-hour IOP monitoring while continuing to receive dorzolamide (for two successive days/nights: at first bid then tid) or brinzolamide bid (once overnight). They were then switched over to receive the other test medication for a further four weeks and subsequently reexamined for 24-hour IOP. A questionnaire survey on treatment satisfaction was performed.Results: In 20 patients dorzolamide bid or tid or brinzolamide bid exerted significant (p < 0.001) reductions of IOP from baseline at all time-points over 24 hours; no difference was detected among the treatment regimens. Significantly (p < 0.05) more patients preferred dorzolamide (n = 9) over brinzolamide (n = 2), whereas nine patients gave a neutral answer. Conclusion: Dorzolamide bid or tid and brinzolamide bid when combined with latanoprost therapy elicited significant IOP reduction for 24 hours. It is rational to consider patients’ preference of therapeutic regimen especially long-term users such as those with glaucoma.Keywords: glaucoma, brinzolamide, dorzolamide, latanoprost combination therapy, 24-hour intraocular pressure (IOP), questionnaire survey
Efficacy and safety of combination therapy with latanoprost after a change in therapeutic regimen from timolol to brinzolamide in Japanese adult patients with primary open-angle glaucoma and ocular hypertension: open, non-randomized 12-week study
Shusaku Ishikawa,Yoshimi Nakamura,Yuko Nakamura,Hiroshi Sakai
Clinical Ophthalmology , 2008,
Abstract: Shusaku Ishikawa1, Yoshimi Nakamura1, Yuko Nakamura1, Hiroshi Sakai1, Shoichi Sawaguchi1, Kazuo Terashima2, Makoto Kanno2, Hidetoshi Yamashita21Department of Ophthalmology, University of the Ryukyus Faculty of Medicine, Okinawa, Japan; 2Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Science, Yamagata University Faculty of Medicine, Yamagata, JapanPurpose: To compare the efficacy of brinzolamide in Japanese patients with primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG) or ocular hypertension (OH) after a change from timolol in combination therapy with latanoprost.Methods: A 12-week, prospective, open-label, comparative study was performed in 20 patients [11 males and 9 females, mean age of 64.5 ± 11.0 (SD)y] with POAG or OH treated with both latanoprost once daily and timolol 0.5% twice daily. During the study brinzolamide was substituted for timolol. Intraocular pressure (IOP) was measured at baseline, 4, 8, and 12 weeks. Blood pressure (BP), pulse rate (PR), and adverse events were also recorded.Results: IOPs at baseline, 4, 8, and 12 weeks were 18.6 ± 2.1 mmHg, 17.8 ± 2.6 mmHg, 17.4 ± 2.5 mmHg, and 17.3 ± 3.5 mmHg, respectively. IOP reduction at 4 and 8 weeks was statistically significant (p < 0.05). The PR was significantly increased at 12 weeks (p < 0.01), but BP was not significantly affected. Four ocular adverse events were noted, but all were mild and transient.Conclusions: Substituting brinzolamide 1% for timolol 0.5% in combination therapy with latanoprost 0.005% demonstrated significant IOP reduction with improvement in PR with POAG or OH. Combination therapy using latanoprost and brinzolamide may be recommended for better IOP control with fewer systemic adverse events.Keywords: open-angle glaucoma, brinzolamide/latanprost combination therapy, timolol/latanoprost combination therapy, intraocular pressure
Efficacy and Safety of the Skin Adhesive EpinexusTM in Surgical Patients  [PDF]
Noriko Aramaki-Hattori, Keisuke Okabe, Yoshiaki Sakamoto, Shigeki Sakai, Tetsu Hayashida, Maiko Takahashi, Tomoko Seki, Yuko Kitagawa, Hiromitsu Jinno, Kazuo Kishi
Modern Plastic Surgery (MPS) , 2018, DOI: 10.4236/mps.2018.84008
Abstract: This single-center, randomized, and controlled intervention study compared an acrylate skin adhesive, EpinexusTM (Mitsui Chemicals, Inc., Tokyo) with Dermabond AdvancedR (Ethicon, Inc., Somerville, New Jersey). The primary endpoint was cosmetic outcome at 52 weeks after treatment (Manchester Scar Scale), and the secondary endpoints were cosmetic outcome at 4 and 26 weeks after treatment (Manchester Scar Scale), wound closure, and usability. We evaluated 59 patients (29 cases and 30 controls). Failures and adverse events were also evaluated, and 8 adverse events (5 cases and 3 controls) were reported (epidermolysis, n = 4; contact dermatitis, n = 1; eczema, n = 1; and surgical wound dehiscence, n = 2). No difference was observed between groups in cosmetic outcome at 52 and 24 weeks; however, at 4 weeks, cases showed better cosmetic outcome compared with controls. With regard to usability, the treatment duration and application time were significantly longer with EpinexusTM, and ease of application was significantly better with Dermabond AdvancedR.
Lifestyle Adjustment Process to Maintain Family Life for Mothers with Children Who Need Home Medical Care  [PDF]
Yuko Nakakita, Yuko Tomari
Health (Health) , 2018, DOI: 10.4236/health.2018.1012127
Abstract: This aim is to clarify lifestyle adjustment process to maintain family life for mothers with children who need home medical care. We conducted semi-structured interviews with the mothers of children who required home medical care comprising procedures such as suction of sputum and respiratory management over a period of several years since the initiation of home medical care, and analyzed the results using the modified grounded theory approach (M-GTA). We found the process to be composed of nine categories. Immediately after their child who required home medical care began living at home, mothers were concerned about the protection of their unstable child and, therefore, made care of the child a priority. However, they gradually started experiencing the need to engage services for the child in the course of their daily lives and live their lives with assistance. In the course of this new lifestyle, mothers began to regulate their fluctuating feelings and discover a new lifestyle for the family by making the father’s role clear and having him take on some responsibilities, such as dealing with people outside the household. As a result, once making home medical care consistent with the family’s lifestyle, even if this care was not at the same level as that provided while the child was hospitalized, mothers felt they found a way that allowed them to spend time with their other children. In addition, they began to perceive the necessity of maintaining their health, which is crucial to the child’s care. Overall, this facilitated incorporation of prospects for the family’s future life because they tended to pay more attention to their health and the health of their other children. Further, this contributed in coordination of the selection of services that would benefit the entire family, thereby maintaining the family’s lifestyle.
Magnetic Field versus Temperature Phase Diagram of the Spin-1/2 Alternating Chain Compound F5PNN
Yasuo Yoshida,Tatsuya Kawae,Yuko Hosokoshi,Katsuya Inoue,Nobuya Maeshima,Koichi Okunishi,Kiyomi Okamoto,Toru Sakai
Physics , 2007,
Abstract: We have measured the specific heat of the S = 1/2 alternating Heisenberg antiferromagnetic chain compound pentafluorophenyl nitronyl nitroxide in magnetic fields using a single crystal and powder. A sharp peak due to field-induced magnetic ordering (FIMO) is observed in both samples. The H-T phase boundary of the FIMO of the single crystal is symmetric with respect to the central field of the gapless field region HC1 < H < HC2, whereas it is distorted for the powder whose ordering temperatures are lower. An analysis employing calculations based on the finite temperature density matrix renormalization group indicates the possibility of novel incommensurate ordering due to frustration in the powder around the central field.
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