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Search Results: 1 - 10 of 85 matches for " Yomei Tokuda "
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Additive Effects of Rare-Earth Ions in Sodium Aluminoborate Glasses Using 23Na and 27Al Magic Angle Spinning Nuclear Magnetic Resonance  [PDF]
Shunichi Kaneko, Yomei Tokuda, Hirokazu Masai
New Journal of Glass and Ceramics (NJGC) , 2017, DOI: 10.4236/njgc.2017.73006
Abstract: We conducted structural analysis of xNa2O-yY2O3-5B2O3-3Al2O3 and xNa2O-yLa2O3-5B2O3-3Al2O3 glasses to elucidate the additive effects of rare-earth ions in these sodium aluminoborate glasses, and investigated the local environment
Crystal Growth of ZnO Microneedles in Water Containing Microbubbles  [PDF]
Yomei Tokuda, Hiroaki Matsuki, Yoshikatsu Ueda, Hirokazu Masai, Toshinobu Yoko
New Journal of Glass and Ceramics (NJGC) , 2014, DOI: 10.4236/njgc.2014.43007
Abstract:
Microbubble technology is now available in a wide range of industrial fields. The liquid containing microbubbles possesses a large number of air-liquid interfaces, and also generates radicals during bubble collapse. Here, we synthesized ZnO powder to explore the potential of microbubbles as starting materials for the formation of crystalline micro- or nanoparticles. The bubbles facilitated the growth of ZnO microneedles in high yields, and enhanced the reaction by radicals generated on bubble collapsing.
Required amounts of medium and fertilizer for potted culture of zucchini  [PDF]
Hiromi Ikeura, Takahiko Tokuda, Yasuyoshi Hayata
Agricultural Sciences (AS) , 2012, DOI: 10.4236/as.2012.36099
Abstract: In Japan, zucchini culture has yet to get underway, and the current costs of zucchini can be attributed to damage from soil-borne disease and the unstable yields due to seasonal change of female flowers. Eradication of these problems will lead to stable supply and a consequent price reduction of zucchini fruits. We previously clarified the efficacy of potted culture as a new culture method for zucchini, but potted culture can be burdensome as the weak water and nutrient retention capacity of the medium warrants its regular replacement. To solve this problem, in this study, we investigated the blend ratio for mixing rice husk charcoal with peat and the amount of fertilizer required for potted culture of zucchini. Results revealed no significant differences in the length of the largest leaf, total number of flowers, number of female flowers, and the ratio of female flowers to total flowers with different blend ratios of rice husk charcoal to peat. However, the number of harvested fruits increased with higher ratios of rice husk charcoal to peat and was highest at 80:20. The length of the largest leaf increased with increased amounts of fertilizer, with the best response was at 200 g. No significant differences were noted between the ratio of female flowers to total flowers in any treatments. In addition, the number of harvested fruits was highest with 160 g and 200 g of fertilizer. Taken together, the optimal blend ratio of rice husk charcoal to peat is 80:20, and the optimal amount of fertilizer with this ratio is 160 g.
System 3 diagnostic process: the lateral approach
Shimizu T, Tokuda Y
International Journal of General Medicine , 2012, DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/IJGM.S36859
Abstract: tem 3 diagnostic process: the lateral approach Rapid Communication (1152) Total Article Views Authors: Shimizu T, Tokuda Y Published Date October 2012 Volume 2012:5 Pages 873 - 874 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/IJGM.S36859 Received: 09 August 2012 Accepted: 18 September 2012 Published: 17 October 2012 Taro Shimizu,1 Yasuharu Tokuda2 1Rollins School of Public Health, Emory University, Atlanta, GA, USA; 2Institute of Clinical Medicine, Graduate School of Comprehensive Human Sciences, University of Tsukuba, Ibaraki, Japan Abstract: The process of obtaining diagnosis is described as a dual-process model, including the intuitive process, and the analytical process. The similarity between the two systems is that they both infer a diagnosis from patient-derived information. Here we present another process by which to elicit the diagnosis: asking direct questions of the patient themselves, such as “What do you think is the cause?” or “What do you suspect is wrong?” This simple method would enable us to elicit pivotal information for diagnosis. Asking patients direct questions allows them to think about the cause of their own problem and suggest their own diagnosis. This method of reasoning is completely different from the two above-mentioned systems and may represent a third approach. We highlight this third process as an important strategy, thereby using this third effective method of inquiry to facilitate quick and effective diagnosis in conjunction with former two systems.
Pivot and cluster strategy: a preventive measure against diagnostic errors
Shimizu T, Tokuda Y
International Journal of General Medicine , 2012, DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/IJGM.S38805
Abstract: t and cluster strategy: a preventive measure against diagnostic errors Short Report (1721) Total Article Views Authors: Shimizu T, Tokuda Y Published Date November 2012 Volume 2012:5 Pages 917 - 921 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/IJGM.S38805 Received: 04 October 2012 Accepted: 16 October 2012 Published: 06 November 2012 Taro Shimizu,1 Yasuharu Tokuda2 1Rollins School of Public Health, Emory University, Atlanta, GA, USA; 2Institute of Clinical Medicine, Graduate School of Comprehensive Human Sciences, University of Tsukuba, Ibaraki, Japan Abstract: Diagnostic errors constitute a substantial portion of preventable medical errors. The accumulation of evidence shows that most errors result from one or more cognitive biases and a variety of debiasing strategies have been introduced. In this article, we introduce a new diagnostic strategy, the pivot and cluster strategy (PCS), encompassing both of the two mental processes in making diagnosis referred to as the intuitive process (System 1) and analytical process (System 2) in one strategy. With PCS, physicians can recall a set of most likely differential diagnoses (System 2) of an initial diagnosis made by the physicians’ intuitive process (System 1), thereby enabling physicians to double check their diagnosis with two consecutive diagnostic processes. PCS is expected to reduce cognitive errors and enhance their diagnostic accuracy and validity, thereby realizing better patient outcomes and cost- and time-effective health care management.
Pivot and cluster strategy: a preventive measure against diagnostic errors
Shimizu T,Tokuda Y
International Journal of General Medicine , 2012,
Abstract: Taro Shimizu,1 Yasuharu Tokuda21Rollins School of Public Health, Emory University, Atlanta, GA, USA; 2Institute of Clinical Medicine, Graduate School of Comprehensive Human Sciences, University of Tsukuba, Ibaraki, JapanAbstract: Diagnostic errors constitute a substantial portion of preventable medical errors. The accumulation of evidence shows that most errors result from one or more cognitive biases and a variety of debiasing strategies have been introduced. In this article, we introduce a new diagnostic strategy, the pivot and cluster strategy (PCS), encompassing both of the two mental processes in making diagnosis referred to as the intuitive process (System 1) and analytical process (System 2) in one strategy. With PCS, physicians can recall a set of most likely differential diagnoses (System 2) of an initial diagnosis made by the physicians’ intuitive process (System 1), thereby enabling physicians to double check their diagnosis with two consecutive diagnostic processes. PCS is expected to reduce cognitive errors and enhance their diagnostic accuracy and validity, thereby realizing better patient outcomes and cost- and time-effective health care management.Keywords: diagnosis, diagnostic errors, debiasing
System 3 diagnostic process: the lateral approach
Shimizu T,Tokuda Y
International Journal of General Medicine , 2012,
Abstract: Taro Shimizu,1 Yasuharu Tokuda21Rollins School of Public Health, Emory University, Atlanta, GA, USA; 2Institute of Clinical Medicine, Graduate School of Comprehensive Human Sciences, University of Tsukuba, Ibaraki, JapanAbstract: The process of obtaining diagnosis is described as a dual-process model, including the intuitive process, and the analytical process. The similarity between the two systems is that they both infer a diagnosis from patient-derived information. Here we present another process by which to elicit the diagnosis: asking direct questions of the patient themselves, such as “What do you think is the cause?” or “What do you suspect is wrong?” This simple method would enable us to elicit pivotal information for diagnosis. Asking patients direct questions allows them to think about the cause of their own problem and suggest their own diagnosis. This method of reasoning is completely different from the two above-mentioned systems and may represent a third approach. We highlight this third process as an important strategy, thereby using this third effective method of inquiry to facilitate quick and effective diagnosis in conjunction with former two systems.Keywords: diagnosis, diagnostic process, clinical problem solving, dual-process model, clinical reasoning
Trust in the Mass Media and the Healthcare System, Interpersonal Trust and Self-Rated Health: A Population-Based Study in Japan
Yasuharu Tokuda,Takashi Inoguchi
Asian Journal of Epidemiology , 2008,
Abstract: To investigate the relationship between trust in the mass media and self-rated health, we analyzed cross-sectional data of the Japanese population, using a logistic regression adjusted for age, gender, marital status, income, education, occupation, interpersonal trust and trust in the healthcare system. In a total of 2685 participants, 962 (35.8%) were classified as being in poor health. There were 737 (27.4%) with distrust in the mass media. In the adjusted model, distrust in the mass media was significantly associated with poor health with an odds ratio of 1.348 (95% CI, 1.078 to 1.687). Distrust in the healthcare system and interpersonal distrust was also associated with poor health. In conclusion, distrust in the mass media is significantly associated with poor health. Since the mass media is likely to be an important resource for health promotion, quality in media contents needs more improvement to enhance public trust for making people healthier.
A Three-Tier Architecture for User-Centric Ubiquitous Networked Sensing
Jin Nakazawa,Hideyuki Tokuda
ISRN Communications and Networking , 2012, DOI: 10.5402/2012/637134
Abstract:
A Three-Tier Architecture for User-Centric Ubiquitous Networked Sensing
Jin Nakazawa,Hideyuki Tokuda
ISRN Communications and Networking , 2012, DOI: 10.5402/2012/637134
Abstract: In a sensor network, sensor data are usually forwarded from sensor nodes to a database. This tight coupling between the nodes and the database has been complicating user-centric applications that traverse multiple different sensor networks. To break this coupling, thus enabling user-centric applications, we propose a three-tier architecture for ubiquitous networked sensing. Its major feature is that it contains the “core” device, which is assumed to be a terminal held by users between sensor nodes and sensor databases. This architecture supports the sensor data directly transmitted to and consumed by the core device, in addition to the classic ones that are transmitted to the sensor database first, and downloaded to the core. The major contribution of this paper are the following three-fold. First, we clarify the architecture itself. Researchers can leverage the architecture as the baseline of their development. Second, we show two types of prototype implementations of the core device. Industry is allowed to develop a new product for practical use of ambient sensing. Finally, we show a range of applications that are enabled by the architecture and indicate issues that need to be addressed for further investigation. 1. Introduction The recent research and productization of wireless sensor nodes have been enabling ubiquitous networked sensing environment where sensor nodes are densely embedded around users in homes, offices, parks, roads, and so forth. For example, home owners would manage their own sensor networks [1]. A university campus can install its own campus sensing network [2]. Opposing to the node-side, technologies towards sophisticated sensor database have been deeply investigated. Usually, sensor data are directly forwarded from sensor nodes to a database. In the above examples, there would be a sensor database at the home and the campus to store the data captured there. These two sides, sensor nodes and sensor databases, thus form a tightly coupled networked sensing architecture. This tight coupling has been complicating user-centric applications that traverse multiple different sensor networks. For example, suppose an application that records aerial pollution in the places where its user visits. Since aerial sensors are not small, it is not practical to assume that the user carries the sensors. This application thus needs to acquire data from the aerial sensors around the user. With the classic tightly coupled architecture, the application is required to identify the databases where the aerial pollution data are stored and query for the
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