oalib

Publish in OALib Journal

ISSN: 2333-9721

APC: Only $99

Submit

Any time

2020 ( 11 )

2019 ( 86 )

2018 ( 661 )

2017 ( 649 )

Custom range...

Search Results: 1 - 10 of 36948 matches for " Yan Bombardier "
All listed articles are free for downloading (OA Articles)
Page 1 /36948
Display every page Item
Effect of Atmospheric Plasma Paint Removal on the Fatigue Performance of 2024-T3 Aluminium Alloy Sheet  [PDF]
Marko Yanishevsky, Ali Merati, Yan Bombardier
Journal of Minerals and Materials Characterization and Engineering (JMMCE) , 2018, DOI: 10.4236/jmmce.2018.61002
Abstract: This article documents fatigue testing that was conducted using as-painted (baseline) and Atmospheric Plasma de-painted specimens made of 0.063 inch thick 2024-T3 aluminium alloy sheet. The intent of the test program was to determine whether AP de-painting would alter the fatigue properties of this aluminium substrate. AP de-painting process parameters were selected based on previous work that would remove the topcoat, while leaving most of the primer intact. This process was repeated five times to simulate service experience, where aircraft typically undergo five paint/de-paint cycles in their lifetime. As-painted (baseline) and five times de-painted specimens were fatigue tested under constant amplitude conditions, at two load ratios and several maximum stress levels. Ten samples per condition were used to establish statistical behaviour and repeatability. The test results and statistical analysis demonstrated that the selected AP process parameters did not have a detrimental effect on the fatigue performance of 2024-T3 aluminium alloy sheet.
A critical appraisal of clinical practice guidelines for the treatment of lower-limb osteoarthritis
James N Pencharz, Elizabeth Grigoriadis, Gwenderlyn F Jansz, Claire Bombardier
Arthritis Research & Therapy , 2001, DOI: 10.1186/ar381
Abstract: Clinical practice guidelines are "systematically developed statements to assist practitioner and patient decisions about appropriate health care for specific clinical circumstances" [1]. During the past 10 years, there has been a proliferation of clinical practice guidelines published in peer-reviewed literature. However, guidelines developed by different groups addressing the same clinical scenario have resulted in conflicting treatment recommendations [2]. Furthermore, recently completed structured evaluations of clinical practice guidelines led by Grilli [2] and Shaneyfelt [3] have raised concerns about the methodological quality of the guidelines' development.Within the field of rheumatology, a number of clinical practice guidelines have recently been developed. In the year 2000, both the American College of Rheumatology (ACR) [4,5] and the European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) [6] released guidelines for the medical management of lower-limb osteoarthritis (OA).OA is the most common form of arthritis [7]. It is a leading cause of chronic health problems and long-term disability and creates a significant economic burden for health services [8,9]. To date, however, the methodological quality of the various guidelines for the treatment of OA has not been formally evaluated and compared.We performed a systematic literature search and evaluation of treatment guidelines for lower-limb OA. Our aim was to qualitatively document the recommendations provided within the guidelines, and quantitatively assess the methods used to develop them. The guidelines are intended for clinicians, who do not have the time to chase down additional information about their methodological development. We believe that guidelines should be reported in sufficient detail to allow clinicians to make judgements about the validity of their recommendations [10]. Therefore, we limited our evaluation of the guidelines to published materials or information easily accessible on the internet only.T
Cellular assessment of muscle in COPD: case studies of two males
Howard J Green, Eric Bombardier, Margaret E Burnett, et al
International Journal of General Medicine , 2009, DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/IJGM.S5981
Abstract: lar assessment of muscle in COPD: case studies of two males Review (3997) Total Article Views Authors: Howard J Green, Eric Bombardier, Margaret E Burnett, et al Published Date November 2009 Volume 2009:2 Pages 227 - 242 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/IJGM.S5981 Howard J Green1, Eric Bombardier1, Margaret E Burnett1, Christine L D’Arsigny2, Sobia Iqbal1, Katherine A Webb2, Jing Ouyang1, Denis E O’Donnell2 1Department of Kinesiology, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, ON, Canada; 2Division of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Medicine, Queen’s University, Kingston, ON, Canada Abstract: The objective of this paper is to provide an overview of the recent developments in muscle physiology and biochemistry in general, and with respect to chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) specifically. As a way of illustration, we have presented data on the remodeling that occurs in vastus lateralis in two patients with COPD (COPD #1, forced expiratory volume in one second/forced vital capacity [FEV1/FVC] = 63%; COPD #2, FEV1/FVC = 41%) exhibiting differences in muscle wasting as compared to healthy controls (CON;FEV1/FVC = 111 ± 2.2%, n = 4). Type I fibers percentages were lower in both COPD #1 (16.7) and COPD #2 (24.9) compared to CON (57.3 ± 5.2). Cross sectional area of the type I fibers of the patients ranged between 65%–68% of CON and for the type II subtypes (IIA, IIAX, IIX) between 74% and 89% (COPD #1) and 17%–32% (COPD #2). A lower number of capillary contacts were observed for all fiber types in COPD #1 but not COPD #2. Lower concentrations of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) (24%–26%) and phosphocreatine (18%–20%), but not lactate occurred in COPD. In contrast to COPD #1, who displayed normal glucose transporter content, GLUT1 and GLUT4 were only 71% and 54%, respectively of CON in COPD #2. Lower monocarboxylate contents were found for MCT1 in both COPD #1 (63%) and COPD #2 (41%) and for MCT4 (78%) in COPD #1. Maximal oxidative enzyme activities (Vmax) for COPD #2 ranged between 37% (succinic dehydrogenase) and 70% (cytochrome C oxidase) of CON. For the cytosolic enzymes, Vmax ranged between 89% (hexokinase) to 31% (pyruvate kinase) of CON. Depressions were also observed in Vmax of the Na+-K+-ATPase for COPD #1 (66% of CON) but not COPD #2 (92% of CON) while Vmax of the Ca2+-ATPase was near normal in COPD #1 (84% CON). It is concluded that disturbances can occur in muscle to a wide range of excitation, contraction and metabolic processes in COPD.
HORMONE REPLACEMENT AND STRENGTH TRAINING POSITIVELY INFLUENCE BALANCE DURING GAIT IN POST-MENOPAUSAL FEMALES: A PILOT STUDY
Stephen D. Perry,Eric Bombardier,Alison Radtke,Peter M. Tiidus
Journal of Sports Science and Medicine , 2005,
Abstract: This study examined the effects of hormone replacement combined with strength training on improving dynamic balance control in post-menopausal women. Thirty one participating post-menopausal women were divided into three groups (hormone replacement (HR), non-hormone replacement (NR) and control (CR) group). HR and NR groups were tested for muscle strength and balance control during gait, prior to training and following a six week lower body strength training program. Quadriceps muscle strength was evaluated as isokinetic peak torque (60°·sec-1) using a CYBEX NORM and balance control was evaluated by center of mass - base of support relationships and ground reaction forces during gait perturbations. Only the HR group showed significantly (p < 0.05) improved balance control during the initial phase of unexpected gait termination and single stance periods while walking across uneven terrain following training. The strength gains in the HR group tended to be greater than in the NR group over the six week training program, although neither group showed statistically significant increases. The CR group showed no significant differences between testing times. HR in post-menopausal females may enhance dynamic balance control when combined with a strength training program, even if no statistically significant gains in strength are achieved
ATP Consumption by Sarcoplasmic Reticulum Ca2+ Pumps Accounts for 40-50% of Resting Metabolic Rate in Mouse Fast and Slow Twitch Skeletal Muscle
Ian Curtis Smith, Eric Bombardier, Chris Vigna, A. Russell Tupling
PLOS ONE , 2013, DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0068924
Abstract: The main purpose of this study was to directly quantify the relative contribution of Ca2+ cycling to resting metabolic rate in mouse fast (extensor digitorum longus, EDL) and slow (soleus) twitch skeletal muscle. Resting oxygen consumption of isolated muscles (VO2, μL/g wet weight/s) measured polarographically at 30°C was ~20% higher (P<0.05) in soleus (0.326 ± 0.022) than in EDL (0.261 ± 0.020). In order to quantify the specific contribution of Ca2+ cycling to resting metabolic rate, the concentration of MgCl2 in the bath was increased to 10 mM to block Ca2+ release through the ryanodine receptor, thus eliminating a major source of Ca2+ leak from the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR), and thereby indirectly inhibiting the activity of the sarco(endo) plasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPases (SERCAs). The relative (%) reduction in muscle VO2 in response to 10 mM MgCl2 was similar between soleus (48.0±3.7) and EDL (42.4±3.2). Using a different approach, we attempted to directly inhibit SERCA ATPase activity in stretched EDL and soleus muscles (1.42x optimum length) using the specific SERCA inhibitor cyclopiazonic acid (CPA, up to 160 μM), but were unsuccessful in removing the energetic cost of Ca2+ cycling in resting isolated muscles. The results of the MgCl2 experiments indicate that ATP consumption by SERCAs is responsible for 40–50% of resting metabolic rate in both mouse fast- and slow-twitch muscles at 30°C, or 12–15% of whole body resting VO2. Thus, SERCA pumps in skeletal muscle could represent an important control point for energy balance regulation and a potential target for metabolic alterations to oppose obesity.
Physical Activity Among Persons Aging with Mobility Disabilities: Shaping a Research Agenda
Dori E. Rosenberg,Charles H. Bombardier,Jeanne M. Hoffman,Basia Belza
Journal of Aging Research , 2011, DOI: 10.4061/2011/708510
Abstract: With the aging of the baby boomer population and their accompanying burden of disease, future disability rates are expected to increase. This paper summarizes the state of the evidence regarding physical activity and aging for individuals with mobility disability and proposes a healthy aging research agenda for this population. Using a previously published framework, we present evidence in order to compile research recommendations in four areas focusing on older adults with mobility disability: (1) prevalence of physical activity, (2) health benefits of physical activity, (3) correlates of physical activity participation, and, (4) promising physical activity intervention strategies. Overall, findings show a dearth of research examining physical activity health benefits, correlates (demographic, psychological, social, and built environment), and interventions among persons aging with mobility disability. Further research is warranted. 1. Introduction Disability rates are expected to increase with the aging of the baby boomer population [1]. Indeed, recent National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) data suggest that for those 60–69 years old, the prevalence of disability in activities of daily living, instrumental activities of daily living, and mobility is increasing [1, 2]. The future burden could overwhelm healthcare systems, rehabilitation medicine clinics, and public health agencies. With the increase in an aging demographic, researchers are focusing on ways to prevent secondary conditions in aging persons. Physical activity is recognized as a behavior with strong positive effects on mental, physical, and cognitive health [3]. The benefit of increased physical activity across all age groups is substantial. Thus, efforts to promote physical activity among older adults with existing mobility disability could help prevent a large burden of secondary illness. Although much physical activity research has focused on older adults who are free of disability and illness, the need still exists for a healthy aging research agenda specific to older adults with mobility disability for tertiary prevention purposes. Promoting healthy aging among people who already have mobility disabilities has been neglected. People with mobility disabilities may benefit from living in accordance with a healthy aging model that includes “the development and maintenance of optimal physical, mental, and social well-being and function” [4]. While the underlying mobility disability may not be reversible, general mental, physical, and cognitive health can be improved.
An empirical study using permutation-based resampling in meta-regression
Joel J Gagnier, David Moher, Heather Boon, Claire Bombardier, Joseph Beyene
Systematic Reviews , 2012, DOI: 10.1186/2046-4053-1-18
Abstract: We isolated a sample of randomized controlled clinical trials (RCTs) for interventions that have a small number of trials (herbal medicine trials). Trials were then grouped by herbal species and condition and assessed for methodological quality using the Jadad scale, and data were extracted for each outcome. Finally, we performed meta-analyses on the primary outcome of each group of trials and meta-regression for methodological quality subgroups within each meta-analysis. We used large sample methods and permutation methods in our meta-regression modeling. We then compared final models and final P values between methods.We collected 110 trials across 5 intervention/outcome pairings and 5 to 10 trials per covariate. When applying large sample methods and permutation-based methods in our backwards stepwise regression the covariates in the final models were identical in all cases. The P values for the covariates in the final model were larger in 78% (7/9) of the cases for permutation and identical for 22% (2/9) of the cases.We present empirical evidence that permutation-based resampling may not change final models when using backwards stepwise regression, but may increase P values in meta-regression of multiple covariates for relatively small amount of trials.Systematic reviews are prone to various forms of heterogeneity between included studies. Variability in the participants, interventions and outcomes across studies may be termed clinical heterogeneity; variability in the trial design and quality is typically termed methodological heterogeneity; variability in treatment effects between trials can be termed statistical heterogeneity [1,2]. Methodological heterogeneity hinges on the exact methods of the individual trials, and how they differ from each other. That is, trials that do not properly conceal allocation to treatment groups may bias estimates in treatment effect and cause increased variations in effect between studies included systematic reviews [3]. Signifi
Estrogen supplementation failed to attenuate biochemical indices of neutrophil infiltration or damage in rat skeletal muscles following ischemia
TIIDUS,PETER M; DELLER,MIRADA; BOMBARDIER,ERIC; GüL,MUSTAFA; LIU,X. LINDA;
Biological Research , 2005, DOI: 10.4067/S0716-97602005000200011
Abstract: this study examined the effects of estrogen supplementation on markers of neutrophil infiltration and damage in skeletal muscle of rats following ischemia. male and female gonad-intact rats, with or without 14 days of estrogen supplementation were subjected to two hours of hind-limb ischemia and sacrificed at 24, 48 or 72 hours post-ischemia. control animals were sacrificed without ischemia. plantaris and red and white gastrocneimus muscles were removed and assayed for myeloperoxidase (mpo), a marker of neutrophil infiltration, and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (g6pd) and ?-glucuronidase (glu), as markers of muscle damage. significant elevations of mpo, g6pd and glu activities were observed at various time points post-ischemia. no systematic differences between genders were noted in any of the measures. estrogen supplementation in both male and female animals failed to significantly attenuate post-ischemia increases in mpo, g6pd and glu activities in any of the muscles studied and in some cases accentuated activities of some of these measures. unlike previous findings following exercise in skeletal muscle, this study failed to demonstrate estrogen-induced attenuation of indices of neutrophil infiltration or damage in skeletal muscles of rats up to 72 hours following ischemia. this demonstrates that estrogen may not consistently attenuate neutrophil infiltration and that a number of variables including damage modality, tissue or estrogen level may influence this.
Cellular assessment of muscle in COPD: case studies of two males
Howard J Green,Eric Bombardier,Margaret E Burnett,et al
International Journal of General Medicine , 2009,
Abstract: Howard J Green1, Eric Bombardier1, Margaret E Burnett1, Christine L D’Arsigny2, Sobia Iqbal1, Katherine A Webb2, Jing Ouyang1, Denis E O’Donnell21Department of Kinesiology, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, ON, Canada; 2Division of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Medicine, Queen’s University, Kingston, ON, CanadaAbstract: The objective of this paper is to provide an overview of the recent developments in muscle physiology and biochemistry in general, and with respect to chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) specifically. As a way of illustration, we have presented data on the remodeling that occurs in vastus lateralis in two patients with COPD (COPD #1, forced expiratory volume in one second/forced vital capacity [FEV1/FVC] = 63%; COPD #2, FEV1/FVC = 41%) exhibiting differences in muscle wasting as compared to healthy controls (CON;FEV1/FVC = 111 ± 2.2%, n = 4). Type I fibers percentages were lower in both COPD #1 (16.7) and COPD #2 (24.9) compared to CON (57.3 ± 5.2). Cross sectional area of the type I fibers of the patients ranged between 65%–68% of CON and for the type II subtypes (IIA, IIAX, IIX) between 74% and 89% (COPD #1) and 17%–32% (COPD #2). A lower number of capillary contacts were observed for all fiber types in COPD #1 but not COPD #2. Lower concentrations of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) (24%–26%) and phosphocreatine (18%–20%), but not lactate occurred in COPD. In contrast to COPD #1, who displayed normal glucose transporter content, GLUT1 and GLUT4 were only 71% and 54%, respectively of CON in COPD #2. Lower monocarboxylate contents were found for MCT1 in both COPD #1 (63%) and COPD #2 (41%) and for MCT4 (78%) in COPD #1. Maximal oxidative enzyme activities (Vmax) for COPD #2 ranged between 37% (succinic dehydrogenase) and 70% (cytochrome C oxidase) of CON. For the cytosolic enzymes, Vmax ranged between 89% (hexokinase) to 31% (pyruvate kinase) of CON. Depressions were also observed in Vmax of the Na+-K+-ATPase for COPD #1 (66% of CON) but not COPD #2 (92% of CON) while Vmax of the Ca2+-ATPase was near normal in COPD #1 (84% CON). It is concluded that disturbances can occur in muscle to a wide range of excitation, contraction and metabolic processes in COPD.Keywords: vastus lateralis, fiber types, area, capillarization, metabolism, enzymatic pathways, excitation-contraction processes, glucose and monocarboxylate transporters
Activity and participation after spinal cord injury: State-of-the-art report
Philip M. Ullrich, PhD,Ann M. Spungen, EdD,Darryn Atkinson, PT,Charles H. Bombardier, PhD
Journal of Rehabilitation Research and Development , 2012,
Abstract: The importance of activities and community participation for persons with spinal cord injury (SCI) has been recognized for decades and yet theoretical and empirical advances have been limited. This report summarizes the recommendations for researchers on the topic of measuring activity and participation among persons with SCI formulated by the Spinal Cord Injury workgroup at the State-of-the-Art Conference on Outcome Measures in Rehabilitation held in January 2010. Activity and participation were defined as independent constructs ideally measured in reference to personal values and environmental influences. Measures of activity, participation, and factors influencing activity and participation are reviewed and critiqued. Gaps in available measures are described, measures in development are discussed, and suggestions for future research are made.
Page 1 /36948
Display every page Item


Home
Copyright © 2008-2017 Open Access Library. All rights reserved.