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Search Results: 1 - 10 of 223773 matches for " Wumba R "
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Epidemiology, clinical, immune, and molecular profiles of microsporidiosis and cryptosporidiosis among HIV/AIDS patients
Wumba R,Longo-Mbenza B,Menotti J,Mandina M
International Journal of General Medicine , 2012,
Abstract: Roger Wumba,1 Benjamin Longo-Mbenza,2 Jean Menotti,3,4 Madone Mandina,5 Fabien Kintoki,5 Nani Hippolyte Situakibanza,1,5 Marie Kapepela Kakicha,6 Josue Zanga,1 Kennedy Mbanzulu-Makola,1 Tommy Nseka,1 Jean Pierre Mukendi,1 Eric Kendjo,7 Jean Sala,1 Marc Thellier7,81Department of Tropical Medicine, Infectious and Parasitic Diseases, Department of Parasitology, University Clinic of Kinshasa, Faculty of Medicine, University of Kinshasa, Kinshasa, Congo; 2Faculty of Health Sciences, Walter Sisulu University, Eastern Cape, South Africa; 3Laboratory of Parasitology and Mycology, Saint-Louis Hospital, Public Assistance-Hospitals of Paris, Paris, France; 4Faculty of Medicine, Lariboisière-Saint-Louis, University of Paris VII, Paris, France; 5Department of Internal Medicine, University Clinic of Kinshasa, Faculty of Medicine, University of Kinshasa, Kinshasa, Congo; 6Department of Pediatrics, University Clinic of Kinshasa, Faculty of Medicine, University of Kinshasa, Kinshasa, Congo; 7National Center for Malaria Research, AP-HP, CHU Pitie Salpêtrière, Paris, France; 8Laboratory of Parasitology and Mycology, Pitié Salpêtrière Hospital, Public Assistance-Hospitals of Paris, Pierre and Marie Curie University, Paris, FranceBackground: The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of intestinal parasites, with special emphasis on microsporidia and Cryptosporidium, as well as their association with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) symptoms, risk factors, and other digestive parasites. We also wish to determine the molecular biology definitions of the species and genotypes of microsporidia and Cryptosporidium in HIV patients.Methods: In this cross-sectional study, carried out in Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of the Congo, stool samples were collected from 242 HIV patients (87 men and 155 women) with referred symptoms and risk factors for opportunistic intestinal parasites. The analysis of feces specimen were performed using Ziehl–Neelsen stainings, real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR), immunofluorescence indirect monoclonal antibody, nested PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism, and PCR amplification and sequencing. Odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence intervals were used to quantify the risk.Results: Of the 242 HIV patients, 7.8%, 0.4%, 5.4%, 0.4%, 2%, 10.6%, and 2.8% had Enterocytozoon bieneusi, Encephalitozoon intestinalis, Cryptosporidium spp., Isospora belli, pathogenic intestinal protozoa, nonpathogenic intestinal protozoa, and helminths, respectively. We found five genotypes of E. bieneusi: two older, NIA1 and D, and three new, KIN1, KIN2
Nadir CD4+, religion, antiretroviral therapy, incidence of type 2 diabetes mellitus, and increasing rates of obesity among black Africans with HIV disease
Mandina Ndona M,Longo-Mbenza B,Wumba R,Tandu Umba B
International Journal of General Medicine , 2012,
Abstract: Madone Mandina Ndona,1 Benjamin Longo-Mbenza,2 Roger Wumba,3 Barthelemy Tandu Umba,4 Baudouin Buassa-bu-Tsumbu,5 Marcel Mbula Mambimbi,1 Thaddée Odio Wobin,1 Simon Mbungu Fuele61Department of Internal Medicine, University of Kinshasa, Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo; 2Walter Sisulu University, Faculty of Health Sciences, Mthatha, Eastern Cape, South Africa; 3Tropical Medicine Department, Infectious and Parasitic Diseases, University Clinic of Kinshasa and University of Kinshasa, Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo; 4Department of Gynecology, 5Department of Biochemistry, University of Kinshasa, Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo; 6Biostatistics Unit of Lomo Medical Center and Heart of Africa Center of Cardiology, Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of CongoBackground: The purpose of this study was to determine the cross-sectional association between some sociodemographic factors and antiretroviral therapy (ART), as well as the incidence and predictors of type 2 diabetes mellitus among Central Africans with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) disease.Methods: This study had a cross-sectional design and was a prospective analysis of 102 patients with HIV disease (49 on ART versus 53 not on ART) in Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo, between 2004 and 2008. A Cox regression model was used to assess for any relationship between type 2 diabetes and exposure to combination ART without protease inhibitors, after adjusting for known risk factors for type 2 diabetes, nadir CD4 and CD8 levels, viral load, marital status, and religion.Results: Unexpectedly elevated rates of smoking, excess alcohol intake, and ART-related total, abdominal, and peripheral obesity were observed in our study group of HIV patients. At the end of follow-up, five patients were diagnosed with type 2 diabetes (incidence rate 4.9%, 9.8 per 1000 person-years). Univariate risk factors for type 2 diabetes were male gender (relative risk [RR] 1.1, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.01–1.4; P = 0.019), traditional religion versus new charismatic religion (RR 1.1, 95% CI 1.01–1.3; P = 0.046), exposure to ART (RR 1.1, 95% CI 1.002–1.3; P = 0.034), and single status (RR 6.2, 95% CI 1.5–15; P = 0.047). In multivariate analysis, strong significant independent predictors of type 2 diabetes were belonging to a traditional religion (HR 2.1, 95% CI 1.1–4.2; P = 0.036) and a relative increase in nadir CD4 cell count (beta coefficient 0.003; P < 0.0001).Conclusion: ART-related obesity and type 2 diabetes are becoming increasing problems in Central Africans with HIV disease. A relative increase in nadi
Nadir CD4+, religion, antiretroviral therapy, incidence of type 2 diabetes mellitus, and increasing rates of obesity among black Africans with HIV disease
Mandina Ndona M, Longo-Mbenza B, Wumba R, Tandu Umba B, Buassa-bu-Tsumbu B, Mbula Mambimbi M, Odio Wobin T, Mbungu Fuele S
International Journal of General Medicine , 2012, DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/IJGM.S32167
Abstract: dir CD4+, religion, antiretroviral therapy, incidence of type 2 diabetes mellitus, and increasing rates of obesity among black Africans with HIV disease Original Research (811) Total Article Views Authors: Mandina Ndona M, Longo-Mbenza B, Wumba R, Tandu Umba B, Buassa-bu-Tsumbu B, Mbula Mambimbi M, Odio Wobin T, Mbungu Fuele S Published Date November 2012 Volume 2012:5 Pages 983 - 990 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/IJGM.S32167 Received: 24 March 2012 Accepted: 01 August 2012 Published: 23 November 2012 Madone Mandina Ndona,1 Benjamin Longo-Mbenza,2 Roger Wumba,3 Barthelemy Tandu Umba,4 Baudouin Buassa-bu-Tsumbu,5 Marcel Mbula Mambimbi,1 Thaddée Odio Wobin,1 Simon Mbungu Fuele6 1Department of Internal Medicine, University of Kinshasa, Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo; 2Walter Sisulu University, Faculty of Health Sciences, Mthatha, Eastern Cape, South Africa; 3Tropical Medicine Department, Infectious and Parasitic Diseases, University Clinic of Kinshasa and University of Kinshasa, Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo; 4Department of Gynecology, 5Department of Biochemistry, University of Kinshasa, Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo; 6Biostatistics Unit of Lomo Medical Center and Heart of Africa Center of Cardiology, Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo Background: The purpose of this study was to determine the cross-sectional association between some sociodemographic factors and antiretroviral therapy (ART), as well as the incidence and predictors of type 2 diabetes mellitus among Central Africans with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) disease. Methods: This study had a cross-sectional design and was a prospective analysis of 102 patients with HIV disease (49 on ART versus 53 not on ART) in Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo, between 2004 and 2008. A Cox regression model was used to assess for any relationship between type 2 diabetes and exposure to combination ART without protease inhibitors, after adjusting for known risk factors for type 2 diabetes, nadir CD4 and CD8 levels, viral load, marital status, and religion. Results: Unexpectedly elevated rates of smoking, excess alcohol intake, and ART-related total, abdominal, and peripheral obesity were observed in our study group of HIV patients. At the end of follow-up, five patients were diagnosed with type 2 diabetes (incidence rate 4.9%, 9.8 per 1000 person-years). Univariate risk factors for type 2 diabetes were male gender (relative risk [RR] 1.1, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.01–1.4; P = 0.019), traditional religion versus new charismatic religion (RR 1.1, 95% CI 1.01–1.3; P = 0.046), exposure to ART (RR 1.1, 95% CI 1.002–1.3; P = 0.034), and single status (RR 6.2, 95% CI 1.5–15; P = 0.047). In multivariate analysis, strong significant independent predictors of type 2 diabetes were belonging to a traditional religion (HR 2.1, 95% CI 1.1–4.2; P = 0.036) and a relative increase in nadir CD4 cell count (beta coefficient 0.003; P < 0.0001). Conclusion: ART-related obesity and ty
Epidemiology, clinical, immune, and molecular profiles of microsporidiosis and cryptosporidiosis among HIV/AIDS patients
Wumba R, Longo-Mbenza B, Menotti J, Mandina M, Kintoki F, Situakibanza NH, Kakicha MK, Zanga J, Mbanzulu-Makola K, Nseka T, Mukendi JP, Kendjo E, Sala J, Thellier M
International Journal of General Medicine , 2012, DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/IJGM.S32344
Abstract: emiology, clinical, immune, and molecular profiles of microsporidiosis and cryptosporidiosis among HIV/AIDS patients Original Research (1567) Total Article Views Authors: Wumba R, Longo-Mbenza B, Menotti J, Mandina M, Kintoki F, Situakibanza NH, Kakicha MK, Zanga J, Mbanzulu-Makola K, Nseka T, Mukendi JP, Kendjo E, Sala J, Thellier M Published Date July 2012 Volume 2012:5 Pages 603 - 611 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/IJGM.S32344 Received: 28 March 2012 Accepted: 12 April 2012 Published: 19 July 2012 Roger Wumba,1 Benjamin Longo-Mbenza,2 Jean Menotti,3,4 Madone Mandina,5 Fabien Kintoki,5 Nani Hippolyte Situakibanza,1,5 Marie Kapepela Kakicha,6 Josue Zanga,1 Kennedy Mbanzulu-Makola,1 Tommy Nseka,1 Jean Pierre Mukendi,1 Eric Kendjo,7 Jean Sala,1 Marc Thellier7,8 1Department of Tropical Medicine, Infectious and Parasitic Diseases, Department of Parasitology, University Clinic of Kinshasa, Faculty of Medicine, University of Kinshasa, Kinshasa, Congo; 2Faculty of Health Sciences, Walter Sisulu University, Eastern Cape, South Africa; 3Laboratory of Parasitology and Mycology, Saint-Louis Hospital, Public Assistance-Hospitals of Paris, Paris, France; 4Faculty of Medicine, Lariboisière-Saint-Louis, University of Paris VII, Paris, France; 5Department of Internal Medicine, University Clinic of Kinshasa, Faculty of Medicine, University of Kinshasa, Kinshasa, Congo; 6Department of Pediatrics, University Clinic of Kinshasa, Faculty of Medicine, University of Kinshasa, Kinshasa, Congo; 7National Center for Malaria Research, AP-HP, CHU Pitie Salpêtrière, Paris, France; 8Laboratory of Parasitology and Mycology, Pitié Salpêtrière Hospital, Public Assistance-Hospitals of Paris, Pierre and Marie Curie University, Paris, France Background: The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of intestinal parasites, with special emphasis on microsporidia and Cryptosporidium, as well as their association with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) symptoms, risk factors, and other digestive parasites. We also wish to determine the molecular biology definitions of the species and genotypes of microsporidia and Cryptosporidium in HIV patients. Methods: In this cross-sectional study, carried out in Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of the Congo, stool samples were collected from 242 HIV patients (87 men and 155 women) with referred symptoms and risk factors for opportunistic intestinal parasites. The analysis of feces specimen were performed using Ziehl–Neelsen stainings, real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR), immunofluorescence indirect monoclonal antibody, nested PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism, and PCR amplification and sequencing. Odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence intervals were used to quantify the risk. Results: Of the 242 HIV patients, 7.8%, 0.4%, 5.4%, 0.4%, 2%, 10.6%, and 2.8% had Enterocytozoon bieneusi, Encephalitozoon intestinalis, Cryptosporidium spp., Isospora belli, pathogenic intestinal protozoa, nonpathogenic intestinal protozoa, and hel
Enterocytozoon bieneusi Identification Using Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction and Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism in HIV-Infected Humans from Kinshasa Province of the Democratic Republic of Congo
Roger Wumba,Menotti Jean,Longo-Mbenza Benjamin,Mandina Madone,Kintoki Fabien,Zanga Josué,Sala Jean,Kendjo Eric,Guillo-Olczyk AC,Thellier Marc
Journal of Parasitology Research , 2012, DOI: 10.1155/2012/278028
Abstract: Objective. To determine the prevalence and the genotypes of Enterocytozoon bieneusi in stool specimens from HIV patients. Methods. This cross-sectional study was carried out in Kinshasa hospitals between 2009 and 2012. Detection of microsporidia including E. bieneusi and E. intestinalis was performed in 242 HIV-infected patients. Typing was based on DNA polymorphism of the ribosomal DNA ITS region of E. bieneusi. PCRRFLP generated with two restriction enzymes (Nla III and Fnu 4HI) in PCR-amplified ITS products for classifying strains into different lineages. The diagnosis performance of the indirect immune-fluorescence-monoclonal antibody (IFI-AcM) was defined in comparison with real-time PCR as the gold standard. Results. Out of 242 HIV-infected patients, using the real-time PCR, the prevalence of E. bieneusi was 7.9% (=19) among the 19 E. bieneusi, one was coinfected with E. intestinalis. In 19 E. bieneusi persons using PCR-RFLP method, 5 type I strains of E. bieneusi (26.3%) and 5 type IV strains of E. bieneusi (26.3%) were identified. The sensitivity of IFI-AcM was poor as estimated 42.1%. Conclusion. Despite different PCR methods, there is possible association between HIVinfection, geographic location (France, Cameroun, Democratic Republic of Congo), and the concurrence of type I and type IV strains.
Power Aware Routing Protocol (PARP) for Wireless Sensor Networks  [PDF]
R. Prema, R. Rangarajan
Wireless Sensor Network (WSN) , 2012, DOI: 10.4236/wsn.2012.45019
Abstract: Several wireless sensor network applications ought to decide the intrinsic variance between energy efficient communication and the requirement to attain preferred quality of service (QoS) such as packet delivery ratio, delay and to reduce the power consumption of wireless sensor nodes. In order to address this challenge, we propose the Power Aware Routing Protocol (PARP), which attains application-specified communication delays at low energy cost by dynamically adapting transmission power and routing decisions. Extensive simulation results prove that the proposed PARP attains better QoS and reduced power consumption.
An Innovative Low Cost EM Pollution Measurement System  [PDF]
R. Sittalatchoumy, R. Seetharaman
Circuits and Systems (CS) , 2016, DOI: 10.4236/cs.2016.78176
Abstract: Mobile phones and other electronic devices are emitting radiations that will provide harmful effects to the human health. In order to measure the radiation, an innovative low cost measurement system is proposed in this paper. The ideology is to simplify the circuit’s value by converting a voltage detecting circuit to a field detecting circuit by finding an optimum resistance on trial and error basis. The requirement for a trial and error technique is to not allow too high or too low resistance which can be either short or open, resulting provides more damage to the circuit.
Ant Lion Optimization Approach for Load Frequency Control of Multi-Area Interconnected Power Systems  [PDF]
R. Satheeshkumar, R. Shivakumar
Circuits and Systems (CS) , 2016, DOI: 10.4236/cs.2016.79206
Abstract: This work proposes a novel nature-inspired algorithm called Ant Lion Optimizer (ALO). The ALO algorithm mimics the search mechanism of antlions in nature. A time domain based objective function is established to tune the parameters of the PI controller based LFC, which is solved by the proposed ALO algorithm to reach the most convenient solutions. A three-area interconnected power system is investigated as a test system under various loading conditions to confirm the effectiveness of the suggested algorithm. Simulation results are given to show the enhanced performance of the developed ALO algorithm based controllers in comparison with Genetic Algorithm (GA), Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO), Bat Algorithm (BAT) and conventional PI controller. These results represent that the proposed BAT algorithm tuned PI controller offers better performance over other soft computing algorithms in conditions of settling times and several performance indices.
Obtaining Optimal Solution by Using Very Good Non-Basic Feasible Solution of the Transportation and Linear Programming Problem  [PDF]
R. R. K. Sharma
American Journal of Operations Research (AJOR) , 2017, DOI: 10.4236/ajor.2017.75021
Abstract: For the transportation problem, Sharma and Sharma [1] have given a very computationally efficient heuristic (runs in O(c*n2) time) to give very good dual solution to transportation problem. Sharma and Prasad [2] have given an efficient heuristic (complexity O(n3) procedure to give a very good primal solution (that is generally non-basic feasible solution) to transportation problem by using the very good dual solution given by Sharma and Sharma [2]. In this paper we use the solution given by Sharma and Prasad [2] to get a very good Basic Feasible Solution to transportation problem, so that network simplex (worst case complexity (O(n3*(log(n))) can be used to reach the optimal solution to transportation problem. In the second part of this paper, we give a simple heuristic procedure to get a very good BFS to linear programming problem from the solution given by Karmarkar [3] (that generally produces a very good non-basic feasible solution in polynomial time (O(n5.5)). We give a procedure to obtain a good BFS for LP by starting from the solution given by Karmarkar [3]. We note that this procedure (given here) is significantly different from the procedure given in [4].
Power Analysis of Sensor Node Using Simulation Tool  [PDF]
R. Sittalatchoumy, R. Kanthavel, R. Seetharaman
Circuits and Systems (CS) , 2016, DOI: 10.4236/cs.2016.713348
Abstract: Power consumption of sensor node is analyzed in this paper. In order to analyze the energy consumption, the node model is simulated using Proteus Software tool. The proposed sensor nodes power characteristics are measured by using different combinations of microprocessors and sensors. Using this, the energy consumption of the node is calculated. This is a cost-effective method and provides appropriate power model for specific applications.
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