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Search Results: 1 - 10 of 305059 matches for " V. N. Misra "
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Experimental Investigation of GSM 900 MHz Results Over Northern India with Awas Electromagnetic Code and Other Prediction Models
M. V. S. N. Prasad;P. K. Dalela;Chandrashekhar Misra
PIER , 2012, DOI: 10.2528/PIER11123003
Abstract: Recent trends in propagation modeling indicate the study of mobile radio propagation modeling with the help of electromagnetic formulations which traditionally has been explained with empirical methods. These empirical methods were preferred by the cellular operators in their radio planning tools due to their ease of implementation and less time consumption. In the present study, AWAS electromagnetic code and conventional prediction methods have been employed to explain the observed results of ten base stations mainly in the near field zones of GSM 900 MHz band situated in the urban and suburban regions around Delhi in India. The suitability of the above models in terms of prediction errors and standard deviations are presented. Path loss exponents deduced from the observed data have been explained by Sommerfeld's formulations. Recent trends indicate the study of mobile radio propagation modeling with the help of electromagnetic formulations which traditionally has been explained with empirical methods. These empirical methods were preferred by the cellular operators in their radio planning tools due to their ease of implementation and less time consumption. In the present study AWAS electromagnetic code and conventional prediction methods have been employed to explain the observed results of ten base stations mainly in the near field zones of GSM 900 MHz band situated in the urban and suburban regions around Delhi in India. The suitability of the above models in terms of prediction errors and standard deviations are presented. Path loss exponents deduced from the observed data have been explained by Sommerfeld's formulations.
A comparative study of flurbiprofen and piroxicam in osteoarthritis.
Misra N
Journal of Postgraduate Medicine , 1992,
Abstract: In this single-blind, multiple-dose study the efficacy and tolerability of flurbiprofen was compared with that of piroxicam in 60 adult patients suffering from osteoarthritis of the knee. The patients were randomly allocated to receive either flurbiprofen 100 mg twice daily or piroxicam 20 mg once daily for a period of four weeks. Clinical assessments w.r.t. pain, tenderness, stiffness, swelling and general activity of patient were carried out prior to initiation of trial therapy and thereafter at weekly intervals for four weeks. The findings were graded. Though significant improvements as compared to baseline data occurred in both the treatment groups, flurbiprofen was found to be superior to piroxicam in improving pain on movement and at rest (p < 0.05). The incidence of side effects was less in the group receiving flurbiprofen (6% compared to 47% observed with piroxicam).
Investigating the connection between Quasi Periodic Oscillations and spectral components with NuSTAR data of GRS 1915+105
Anjali Rao Jassal,Santosh V. Vadawale,Mithun N. P. S,Ranjeev Misra
Physics , 2015,
Abstract: The low frequency quasi periodic oscillations (QPOs) are commonly observed during hard states of black hole binaries. Several studies have established various observational/empirical correlations between spectral parameters and QPO properties, indicating a close link between the two. However, the exact mechanism of generation of QPO is not yet well understood. In this paper, we present our attempts to comprehend the connection between the spectral components and the low frequency QPO observed in GRS 1915+105 using the data from NuSTAR. Detailed spectral modeling as well as the presence of the low frequency QPO and its energy dependence during this observation have been reported by Miller et al. (2013) and Zhang et al. (2015) respectively. We investigate the compatibility of the spectral model and energy dependence of the QPO by simulating light curves in various energy bands for small variation of the spectral parameters. The basic concept here is to establish connection, if any, between the QPO and the variation of either a spectral component or a specific parameter, which in turn can shed some light on the origin of the QPO. We begin with the best fit spectral model of Miller et al. (2013) and simulate the light curve by varying the spectral parameter at frequencies close to the observed QPO frequency in order to generate the simulated QPO. Further we simulate similar light curves in various energy bands in order to reproduce the observed energy dependence of RMS amplitude of the QPO. We find that the observed trend of increasing RMS amplitude with energy can be reproduced qualitatively if the spectral index is assumed to be varying with the phases of the QPO. Variation of any other spectral parameter does not reproduce the observed energy dependence.
Ancient Skeletal Evidence for Leprosy in India (2000 B.C.)
Gwen Robbins, V. Mushrif Tripathy, V. N. Misra, R. K. Mohanty, V. S. Shinde, Kelsey M. Gray, Malcolm D. Schug
PLOS ONE , 2009, DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0005669
Abstract: Background Leprosy is a chronic infectious disease caused by Mycobacterium leprae that affects almost 250,000 people worldwide. The timing of first infection, geographic origin, and pattern of transmission of the disease are still under investigation. Comparative genomics research has suggested M. leprae evolved either in East Africa or South Asia during the Late Pleistocene before spreading to Europe and the rest of the World. The earliest widely accepted evidence for leprosy is in Asian texts dated to 600 B.C. Methodology/Principal Findings We report an analysis of pathological conditions in skeletal remains from the second millennium B.C. in India. A middle aged adult male skeleton demonstrates pathological changes in the rhinomaxillary region, degenerative joint disease, infectious involvement of the tibia (periostitis), and injury to the peripheral skeleton. The presence and patterning of lesions was subject to a process of differential diagnosis for leprosy including treponemal disease, leishmaniasis, tuberculosis, osteomyelitis, and non-specific infection. Conclusions/Significance Results indicate that lepromatous leprosy was present in India by 2000 B.C. This evidence represents the oldest documented skeletal evidence for the disease. Our results indicate that Vedic burial traditions in cases of leprosy were present in northwest India prior to the first millennium B.C. Our results also support translations of early Vedic scriptures as the first textual reference to leprosy. The presence of leprosy in skeletal material dated to the post-urban phase of the Indus Age suggests that if M. leprae evolved in Africa, the disease migrated to India before the Late Holocene, possibly during the third millennium B.C. at a time when there was substantial interaction among the Indus Civilization, Mesopotamia, and Egypt. This evidence should be impetus to look for additional skeletal and molecular evidence of leprosy in India and Africa to confirm the African origin of the disease.
iTorin1—An Active Site Inhibitor of mTOR, Suppresses Prostate Cancer Cell Growth Induced by Activated α2M-Macroglobulin Ligation of Cell Surface GRP78  [PDF]
Uma K. Misra, Salvatore V. Pizzo
Journal of Cancer Therapy (JCT) , 2013, DOI: 10.4236/jct.2013.44A008
Abstract:

In this study, we reported the effect of the ATP binding site competitive inhibitor Torin1 on activated α2-macroglobulin (α2M*)-induced cell proliferation and activation of mTORC1 and mTORC2 signaling in prostate cancer cells. Torin1 significantly inhibited α2M*-induced cellproliferation as measured by protein and DNA synthesis. Translational activity, a major cellular response in malignant cells,is coordinately regulated by the mTORC1-S6-kinaseand mTORC1-4EBP1 axes. Torin1 significantly inhibited α2M*- and insulin-induced activation of mTORC1 as determined by phosphorylation of S6-kinaseat Thr389 and 4EBP1 at Thr37/46 compared to untreated cells employing Raptor immunoprecipitates. Torin1 also significantly inhibited α2M*- and insulin-induced upregulation of p-AktT308 and p-AktS473 in

PREVALENCE OF FUNGAL KERATITIS FROM TERTIARY CARE HOSPITAL FROM WESTERN PART OF INDIA
Jadhav S.V., Gandham N.R., Misra R.N., Ujagare M.T., Sharma M. and Sardar M.
International Journal of Microbiology Research , 2012,
Abstract: Introduction: Corneal diseases are a major cause of vision loss and blindness, and caused by bacteria, fungi and protozoa. However, within the topics, as many as two third of ulcer may be due to filamentous fungi and distribution may vary considerably between continents and countries and also within countries. It is essential to determine the local etiology within a given region when planning a corneal ulcer management strategy. Aim: To identify local etiology for corneal ulceration at a tertiary care hospital in western India during a period of Jan 2007 to Dec 2010. Methods: Patients clinically suspected of microbial keratitis were recruited in the study. Corneal ulceration was defined as a loss corneal epithelium with clinical evidence of infection with or without hypopyon. Microscopy and culture were performed by standard conventional method.Result: Of 271 patients investigated fungal etiology was established in 68 (25.9%) of which 48(70.58%) were males. Among the fungal isolates, filamentous fungi, ie 53(77.94%) were predominant. Among these 24(45.28 %) were Aspergillus flavus followed by A. fumigates 9(16.98%) and Fusarium spp. 8(15.9%). Of the 15 isolates of yeasts, Non Candida albicans were identified in 9(60%) cases. Conclusion: Infection by filamentous fungi are frequent cause of corneal damage in tropical developing countries and are difficult to treat. Microscopy and culture is an essential tool in the diagnosis of such infections. Knowledge of the “local” etiology within a region is of value in the management of suppurative keratitis.
Antilens antibody in normal persons and in different clinical conditions
Misra R,Srivastava D,Misra V
Indian Journal of Ophthalmology , 1981,
Abstract:
An intractable corneal ulcer (a case report)
Singh N,Misra M
Indian Journal of Ophthalmology , 1972,
Abstract:
Inflammatory linear verrucous epidermal nevus and spinal anomaly
Madnani N,Misra B
Indian Journal of Dermatology, Venereology and Leprology , 1999,
Abstract:
X-ray spectral evolution of the extragalactic Z-source, LMC X-2
V. K. Agrawal,R. Misra
Physics , 2009, DOI: 10.1111/j.1365-2966.2009.15014.x
Abstract: We present the results obtained by a detailed study of the extragalactic Z source, LMC X-2, using broad band Suzaku data and a large ($ \sim 750$ ksec) data set obtained with the proportional counter array (PCA) onboard RXTE. The PCA data allows for studying the complete spectral evolution along the horizontal, normal and flaring branches of the Z-track. Comparison with previous study show that the details of spectral evolution (like variation of Comptonizing electron temperature), is similar to that of GX 17+2 but unlike that of Cyg X-2 and GX 349+2. This suggests that Z sources are heterogeneous group with perhaps LMC X-2 and GX 17+2 being member of a subclass. However non monotonic evolution of the Compton y-parameter seems to be generic to all sources. The broad band {\it Suzaku} data reveals that the additional soft component of the source modelled as a disk blackbody emission is strongly preferred over one where it is taken to be a blackbody spectrum. This component as well as the temperature of seed photons do not vary when source goes into a flaring mode and the entire variation can be ascribed to the Comptonizing cloud. The bolometric unabsorbed luminosity of the source is well constrained to be $ \sim 2.23 \times 10^{38}$ ergs/sec which if the source is Eddington limited implies a neutron star mass of 1.6 M$_\odot$. We discuss the implications of these results.
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