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Search Results: 1 - 10 of 359489 matches for " Ulysses P. de; "
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Three new varieties in Ocimum L. (Lamiaceae)
Albuquerque, Ulysses P. de;
Brazilian Archives of Biology and Technology , 1999, DOI: 10.1590/S1516-89131999000100001
Abstract: three new infraspecifc taxa in ocimum are described from northeastern brazil, which were based in vegetative morphology, habit, stem indumentum or purple pigmentation; these were o. minimum var. religiosum albuquerque var. nov., o. campechianum var. pubescens albuquerque var. nov. and o. campechianum var. congestifolium albuquerque var. nov.
Local knowledge: Who cares?
Ina Vandebroek, Victoria Reyes-García, Ulysses P de Albuquerque, Rainer Bussmann, Andrea Pieroni
Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine , 2011, DOI: 10.1186/1746-4269-7-35
Abstract: In this Thematic Series, we focus on the potential and actual value of LKS to local and global challenges. The catchphrase of this paragraph, "Think globally, act locally," has been around for a few decades as a slogan for activism at the local level to increase overall well-being on earth. In an increasingly globalized society with many social, economic and environmental uncertainties, what are the lessons that can be drawn from LKS? One of the virtues of LKS is that these systems depart from the premise of interconnectedness and embeddedness, whereby humans and their behaviors are seen as part of a broader environmental, socio-cultural and spiritual context. The ethnobiological literature showcases several examples that demonstrate the importance and usefulness of LKS for community health, nutrition, education and cultural heritage, conservation and other societal challenges, as we will review in the next paragraphs. This Thematic Series of the Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine contains solicited manuscripts based on new research that continues to demonstrate the potential and established value of ethnobiological knowledge and its associated plant and animal resources for local communities and society at large, especially in the areas of community health, education and conservation.The value of LKS for global healthcare has been demonstrated at different levels: (a) in providing primary healthcare to the rural poor in the absence of (mainstream) biomedical healthcare; (b) in being a more satisfying healthcare option to many transnational migrants as compared to biomedical healthcare; and (c) as a way to select interesting candidate plant species for the discovery and development of new pharmaceuticals.Mainstream (biomedical) healthcare is often lacking in quantity and quality in poor rural areas around the world. Innovative thinking and novel approaches are therefore urgently needed to fill the gap between the need for healthcare and its provision in situ.
Dynamics of traditional knowledge of medicinal plants in a rural community in the Brazilian semi-arid region
Silva, Flávia dos Santos;Ramos, Marcelo A.;Hanazaki, Natalia;Albuquerque, Ulysses P. de;
Revista Brasileira de Farmacognosia , 2011, DOI: 10.1590/S0102-695X2011005000054
Abstract: human beings have accumulated rich experience with natural resources over time, but such knowledge can be strongly influenced by several factors, such as age, sex and occupation. this study focuses on the influence of these factors on knowledge of medicinal plants in a rural community in northeastern brazil. data were collected through semi-structured interviews with 102 people, with the number of plants and uses cited studied for quantitative analysis. through this research, it was possible to show that the social variables studied (age, sex and informants occupation) have contributed to the formation of different patterns of knowledge regarding medicinal resources. the results indicate that awareness of this dynamic is necessary for the proper implementation of projects where the goal is the sustainable use of natural resources (because it indicates the different levels of knowledge within a community), for studies intended to discover new drugs (because it indicates the peculiarities of certain groups), and for biodiversity conservation strategies.
Dynamics of traditional knowledge of medicinal plants in a rural community in the Brazilian semi-arid region
Flávia dos Santos Silva,Marcelo A. Ramos,Natalia Hanazaki,Ulysses P. de Albuquerque
Revista Brasileira de Farmacognosia , 2011,
Abstract: Human beings have accumulated rich experience with natural resources over time, but such knowledge can be strongly influenced by several factors, such as age, sex and occupation. This study focuses on the influence of these factors on knowledge of medicinal plants in a rural community in northeastern Brazil. Data were collected through semi-structured interviews with 102 people, with the number of plants and uses cited studied for quantitative analysis. Through this research, it was possible to show that the social variables studied (age, sex and informants occupation) have contributed to the formation of different patterns of knowledge regarding medicinal resources. The results indicate that awareness of this dynamic is necessary for the proper implementation of projects where the goal is the sustainable use of natural resources (because it indicates the different levels of knowledge within a community), for studies intended to discover new drugs (because it indicates the peculiarities of certain groups), and for biodiversity conservation strategies.
Re-examining hypotheses concerning the use and knowledge of medicinal plants: a study in the Caatinga vegetation of NE Brazil
Ulysses de Albuquerque
Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine , 2006, DOI: 10.1186/1746-4269-2-30
Abstract: A study was undertaken with the participation of 31 adults from a rural community in the state of Pernambuco, Brazil, in order to analyze the patterns of use of medicinal plant resources, and to test a number of hypotheses concerning their use and local knowledge about them. The sources of medicinal plants used by the local community, the differences in oral information concerning the use of plants with their effective uses, and the role of exotic plants in local folk medicine practices were examined.Forty-eight plant species were cited as having medicinal uses, of which 56.25% are native to the Caatinga region. The patterns of harvesting and the importance of these trees and shrubs as medicinal plants seem to be compatible with a hypothesis based on the seasonal availability of plant resources. There is no direct correlation between known medicinal plants and those used by the local population, which agrees with observations made in different tropical regions. However, this observation was not interpreted in terms of the idea of "erosion" of knowledge (commonly used to explain this lack of correlation), but rather to propose two new concepts: "mass knowledge" and "stock knowledge".Native plants are a very significant component of locally used medicinal plants, although exotic plants are important for treating specific health problems – which leads the proposal of a hypothesis of diversification.Patterns of medicinal plant use by local peoples are considered to vary as a function of plant habitat collection, cultural changes, and ecological and biochemical aspects [1,2]. For example, on one hand the literature suggests that the most probable explanation for the dominance of weeds in different medicinal floras is that they have high levels of bioactive compounds. This idea is based on the apparency hypothesis [see [3-5]]. The central idea is the following: "the plants could be classified into two basic groups: 'apparent', and 'non-apparent'. 'Apparent' plants are usu
Manejo tradicional de plantas em regi?es neotropicais
Albuquerque, Ulysses Paulino de;
Acta Botanica Brasilica , 1999, DOI: 10.1590/S0102-33061999000300011
Abstract: the main aspects of traditional plant management techniques exercised in the neotropic are briefly reviewed. the aims of this work are: 1. to describe how some traditional populations, especially those located in neotropical areas, manage natural resources; 2. to identify the main strategies employed; 3. to emphasize the contribution of traditional techniques to the sustainable development and management of natural resources. two types of resource management are characterized and discussed: community management, and individual species management. in view of the fact that some traditional populations manage natural resources based on an integrated conception of nature, it is possible to verify that traditional knowledge systems can contribute to sustainable development.
A qualidade das publica??es científicas: considera??es de um Editor de área ao final do mandato
Albuquerque, Ulysses Paulino de;
Acta Botanica Brasilica , 2009, DOI: 10.1590/S0102-33062009000100031
Abstract: quality of scientific publications is being currently discussed considering different perspectives. in this text, we examine some of the main problems concerning textual production in science, emphasizing those considered of bad behaviors. additionally, we present suggestions for authors, reviewers and editors in order to avoid misconducts in the publication process of scientific papers.
The tragedy of the common reviewers: the peer review process
Albuquerque, Ulysses Paulino de;
Revista Brasileira de Farmacognosia , 2011, DOI: 10.1590/S0102-695X2011005000036
Abstract: the peer review process is the dominant system adopted in science to evaluate the quality of articles submitted for publication. various social players are involved in this process, including authors, editors and reviewers. much has been discussed about the need to improve the scientific quality of what is published. the main focus of these discussions has been the work of the authors. however, the editors and reviewers also fulfill an important role. in this opinion article, we discuss some proposals to improve the peer review system, emphasizing the role of reviewers and editors.
The tragedy of the common reviewers: the peer review process
Ulysses Paulino de Albuquerque
Revista Brasileira de Farmacognosia , 2011,
Abstract: The peer review process is the dominant system adopted in science to evaluate the quality of articles submitted for publication. Various social players are involved in this process, including authors, editors and reviewers. Much has been discussed about the need to improve the scientific quality of what is published. The main focus of these discussions has been the work of the authors. However, the editors and reviewers also fulfill an important role. In this opinion article, we discuss some proposals to improve the peer review system, emphasizing the role of reviewers and editors.
Análise da pluviosidade e do efeito de borda sobre os teores de flavonóides em Bauhinia cheilantha (Bong.) Steud., Fabaceae
Peixoto Sobrinho, Tadeu J. da S.;Cardoso, Késsio de C. M.;Gomes, Tiago de L. B.;Albuquerque, Ulysses P.;Amorim, Elba L. C.;
Revista Brasileira de Farmacognosia , 2009, DOI: 10.1590/S0102-695X2009000500015
Abstract: the present study evaluated the influence of the edge-effect and rainfall on flavonoid content in individuals of bauhinia cheilantha (bong.) steud., fabaceae, in an area of caatinga vegetation in pernambuco state, northeastern brazil. the analytical methodology used aluminum chloride binding to quantify flavonoid concentrations by visible light spectrophotometry in leaf extracts of b. cheilantha. in general, forest edges influenced flavonoid production, but it was not possible to relate production with rainfall levels. these results demonstrate that this species uses various strategies to respond to environmental variables.
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