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Search Results: 1 - 10 of 7324 matches for " Toudou Adam "
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Influence of Re-Greening on the Infiltrability of Soils in South-Central Niger  [PDF]
Adamou Mahaman Moustapha, Issoufou Baggnian, Nazoumou Yahaya, Toudou Adam
Journal of Water Resource and Protection (JWARP) , 2014, DOI: 10.4236/jwarp.2014.619155
Abstract: In the Sahel, the climate and the agricultural practices are the main factors used to observe regreening process. But the extension of the latter not being uniform in the farming fields, we can suppose that there are other factors that contribute to the re-greening of certain zones and not others. The infiltrability of soils is considered as an important factor for these changes in the last decades. The influence of re-greening on the infiltrability of soils in the southern strip of Niger was studied through a comparison of zones according to the type of sandy soils (Jigawa/Rerey), siltyclay (Guiéza), silty-sandy (Hako) and clay-silty-sandy (Laka). The evaluated parameters are the texture, the infiltrability and the ecological characteristics (specific index of regeneration “SIR” and the Importance Value Index “IVI”). The main conclusions were: the soils of Niger South-Central are characterized by a sandy texture for more than 80%. The soils which are very sandy (“Jigawa”, “Rerey” and “Guieza”) are more permeable and have more trees contrary to the soil Hako and Laka. Their encrusting has the tendency to reduce the vegetation cover on the soil. The infiltration measurements indicated that the rate of initial and stationary infiltration diminishes while going down towards the South. In fact, it has been recorded a rate of 123 mm/min of initial infiltration and 87 mm/min stationary in Dan Saga on the sandy soils against 76 mm/min and 65 mm/min in Daré respectively for the initial and stationary rate. Therefore, the infiltration seems to influence the density, the SIR and the IVI of the trees from the North towards the South. Some additional work is necessary in order to determine the contribution of Farmer Managed Natural Regeneration (FMNR) in the improvement of the quality of soils and the movement of water in the superficial zones of the soil.
Identification des sources de tolérance au stress hydrique sur des espèces sauvages de la famille des Cucurbitacées en cutlture in vitro
Baragé M.,Balla A.,Toudou A.
Biotechnologie, Agronomie, Société et Environnement , 2006,
Abstract: Identification of tolerance sources to the water stress on wild species of the cucurbitaceous family in in vitro culture. The objective of this survey is to identify sources of tolerance to the water stress. This will permit to choose the adequate material allowing the transfer of genes governing the drought tolerance to the gene pool of the main cultivated species. Indeed, a method has been developed to evaluate the water stress tolerance in vitro. It is based on the capacity of the calus recuperation after dehydration under a laminar flux hot until a loss of 50% of their fresh weight as a basis. The study included nine accessions of wild species and three cultivated varieties of the cucurbitaceous family. It comes out that the three cultivated varieties (melon, cucumber and watermelon), as well as some wild species accessions are sensitive to the water stress. The wild accessions of Cucumis africanus (L4), Cucumis dipsaceus, Citrullus colocynthis (Saudi Arabia) and Citrullus colocynthis (Niger) are obviously tolerant.
Management of postoperative pain: experience of the Niamey National Hospital, Niger
Chaibou MS,Sanoussi S,Sani R,Toudou NA
Journal of Pain Research , 2012,
Abstract: Maman Sani Chaibou,1 Samuila Sanoussi,2 Rachid Sani,2 Nouhou A Toudou,1 Hadjara Daddy,1 Moussa Madougou,1 Idrissa Abdou,1 Habibou Abarchi,2 Martin Chobli31Department of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care, 2Department of Surgery, The Niamey National Hospital, Niamey, Republic of Niger; 3Department of Anesthesiology, Hubert K Maga University Teaching Hospital, Cotonou, BeninObjective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the management of postoperative pain at the Niamey National Hospital.Methods: A prospective study was conducted in the Department of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care at the Niamey National Hospital from March to June, 2009. Data collected included age, sex, literacy, American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) physical status classification, type of anesthesia, type of surgery, postoperative analgesics used, and the cost of analgesics. Three types of pain assessment scale were used depending on the patient's ability to describe his or her pain: the verbal rating scale (VRS), the numerical rating scale (NRS), or the visual analog scale (VAS). Patients were evaluated during the first 48 hours following surgery.Results: The sample included 553 patients. The VRS was used for the evaluation of 72% of patients, the NRS for 14.4%, and the VAS for 13.6%. Of the VRS group, 33.9%, 8.3%, and 2.1% rated their pain as 3 or 4 out of 4 at 12, 24, and 48 hours postoperatively, respectively. For the NRS group, 33.8%, 8.8%, and 2.5% rated their pain as greater than 7 out of 10 at 12, 24, and 48 hours postoperatively, respectively. For the VAS group, 29.3%, 5.4%, and 0% rated their pain as greater than 7 out of 10 at 12, 24, and 48 hours postoperatively, respectively. Conclusion: Postoperative pain assessment and management in developing countries has not been well described. Poverty, illiteracy, and inadequate training of physicians and other health personnel contribute to the underutilization of postoperative analgesia. Analysis of the results gathered at the Niamey National Hospital gives baseline data that can be the impetus to increase training in pain management and to establish standardized protocols.Keywords: postoperative pain, pain scales, Niamey National Hospital
Information Systems Development Methodolgies in Developing Higher Education  [PDF]
Adam Marks
Creative Education (CE) , 2012, DOI: 10.4236/ce.2012.31019
Abstract: Studies concerned with the status of Information Systems Development Methodologies usage in many developing countries including the factors that influence and motivate their use, current trends, difficulties, and barriers to adoption are lacking, especially within the higher education sector. This paper examines these identified gaps in a developing country, namely the United Arab Emirates. The initial findings reveal that there is limited knowledge and understanding of the concept of ISDM in federal higher education institutions in the UAE. This is reflected in the quality of the software products being developed and released. However, the analysed data also reveals a trend whereby federal higher education institutions in the UAE are gradually moving towards increased ISDM adoption and deployment.
Introducing Liability Dollarization and Contractionary Depreciations to the IS Curve  [PDF]
Adam Honig
Modern Economy (ME) , 2012, DOI: 10.4236/me.2012.34061
Abstract: This paper presents a simple modification to the standard IS curve used, at least implicitly, by policymakers that allows capital flight to have a contractionary effect in emerging market economies. In the standard model, capital flight leads to an expansionary shift in the IS curve through an increase in net exports. However, in the presence of liability dollarization for domestic firms, a currency depreciation triggered by capital flight leads to an investment collapse. A simple adjustment to the standard investment schedule captures this channel and allows for the possibility that capital flight yields a contractionary shift in the IS curve.
Which Working Memory Components Predict Fluid Intelligence: The Roles of Attention Control and Active Buffer Capacity  [PDF]
Adam Chuderski
Psychology (PSYCH) , 2014, DOI: 10.4236/psych.2014.55043
Abstract:

This study tested which of two crucial mechanisms of working memory (WM): attention control, consisting of focusing attention on the proper task-set as well as blocking distraction, and the active buffer capacity, related to the number of chunks that can be actively maintained, plays a more important role in WM’s contribution to fluid intelligence. In the first study, the antisaccade task was used, the standard measure of attention control, in a modified variant which resulted in scores less sensitive to individual differences in the active buffer capacity, in comparison to the standard variant. In effect, attention control became a weak predictor of Gf, explaining less than one third of its variance accounted for by the capacity. In the second study, a variant of another attention control test, the Stroop task, was applied, which minimized the load on capacity, and no significant contribution of this task to Gf was found. Thus, when contribution of control and capacity were unconfounded, attention control mechanisms of WM contributed to fluid intelligence to a lesser extent than did the mechanisms related to the active buffer of WM.

Management of postoperative pain: experience of the Niamey National Hospital, Niger
Chaibou MS, Sanoussi S, Sani R, Toudou NA, Daddy H, Madougou M, Abdou I, Abarchi H, Chobli M
Journal of Pain Research , 2012, DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/JPR.S36998
Abstract: nagement of postoperative pain: experience of the Niamey National Hospital, Niger Original Research (1144) Total Article Views Authors: Chaibou MS, Sanoussi S, Sani R, Toudou NA, Daddy H, Madougou M, Abdou I, Abarchi H, Chobli M Published Date December 2012 Volume 2012:5 Pages 591 - 595 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/JPR.S36998 Received: 14 August 2012 Accepted: 03 October 2012 Published: 05 December 2012 Maman Sani Chaibou,1 Samuila Sanoussi,2 Rachid Sani,2 Nouhou A Toudou,1 Hadjara Daddy,1 Moussa Madougou,1 Idrissa Abdou,1 Habibou Abarchi,2 Martin Chobli3 1Department of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care, 2Department of Surgery, The Niamey National Hospital, Niamey, Republic of Niger; 3Department of Anesthesiology, Hubert K Maga University Teaching Hospital, Cotonou, Benin Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the management of postoperative pain at the Niamey National Hospital. Methods: A prospective study was conducted in the Department of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care at the Niamey National Hospital from March to June, 2009. Data collected included age, sex, literacy, American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) physical status classification, type of anesthesia, type of surgery, postoperative analgesics used, and the cost of analgesics. Three types of pain assessment scale were used depending on the patient's ability to describe his or her pain: the verbal rating scale (VRS), the numerical rating scale (NRS), or the visual analog scale (VAS). Patients were evaluated during the first 48 hours following surgery. Results: The sample included 553 patients. The VRS was used for the evaluation of 72% of patients, the NRS for 14.4%, and the VAS for 13.6%. Of the VRS group, 33.9%, 8.3%, and 2.1% rated their pain as 3 or 4 out of 4 at 12, 24, and 48 hours postoperatively, respectively. For the NRS group, 33.8%, 8.8%, and 2.5% rated their pain as greater than 7 out of 10 at 12, 24, and 48 hours postoperatively, respectively. For the VAS group, 29.3%, 5.4%, and 0% rated their pain as greater than 7 out of 10 at 12, 24, and 48 hours postoperatively, respectively. Conclusion: Postoperative pain assessment and management in developing countries has not been well described. Poverty, illiteracy, and inadequate training of physicians and other health personnel contribute to the underutilization of postoperative analgesia. Analysis of the results gathered at the Niamey National Hospital gives baseline data that can be the impetus to increase training in pain management and to establish standardized protocols.
Proposing a novel, efficient measure for assessing glade restoration efficacy: wildflower presence and abundance  [PDF]
Adam E. M. Eltorai
Advances in Bioscience and Biotechnology (ABB) , 2011, DOI: 10.4236/abb.2011.23026
Abstract: Human presence is detrimentally affecting natural environments. Glades are an example of such envi-ronments. As glades diminish in number, proper restoration efforts are essential for the preservation of the habitats’ unique ecosystems, biodiversity and natural processes. To ensure glade survivorship, evaluation of glade restoration efforts is critical. As indicators of the trophic level of producers in a food chain, wildflowers can serve as overall indicators of the restoration process. A comparison of wildflower species presence and abundance between recently restored and control glades offer insights into the restoration progress. In this paper, I propose the us-age of a novel method for assessing restoration effi-cacy. I outline step-by-step how to apply such a method. I then explain how the implementation of such a method can be used to address questions re-garding the restoration effort’s efficacy.
Insect oil and protein: Biochemistry, food and other uses: Review  [PDF]
Abdalbasit Adam Mariod
Agricultural Sciences (AS) , 2013, DOI: 10.4236/as.2013.49B013
Abstract:

In searching for new sources of oil, protein and gelatin researchers have investigated many wild plants, but our research group took a different approach: We looked at insects as oil, protein and gelatin source for both nutritional and industrial applications. According to Sudanese indigenous knowledge, many insects have food and medicinal uses. We targeted two of these insects for our research:Aspongopus vidiuatus(melon bug) and Agonoscelis pubescens(sorghum bug). The two insects showed 27.0% and 28.2% crude protein, 45% and 60% oil, respectively. The oils contained 46.5% and 40.9% oleic acid, 3.4% and 34.5% linoleic acid, 44.2% and 12.1% palmitic acid and traces of linolenic acid,respectively. The tocopherol content of theseoils amounted to 0.3 and 34.0 mg/100g oil, respectively. The total content of sterols in the two oils was 17 and 450 mg/100g oil, respectively, whereasβ-sitosterol was determined as the main compound in all oils with about 60% of the totalsterol. The oxidative stability of the oils, asmeasured by the Rancimat test at 120°C, was 38 and 5.1 h, respectively. Edible gelatin was extracted from the two insect using hot water and mild acid and distilled water. SDS-PAGE patterns ofthe insect gelatins had very low molecularweight chains, and the two gelatins contained 40 kDa asmain component, differential scanning calorimetry results confirmed the difference betweenextraction methods concerning the extracted gelatin quality. FTIR spectra of melon and sorghum bug gelatins were similar and the absorption bands were situated in more than 6 bands in melon bug gelatin and only 6 bands in sorghum bug gelatin. Microstructures of the insect gelatinexamined with the scanning electron microscope showed that melon bug exhibited the finest gelatin network with very small voids. Melon bug

gelatin showed the finer structure with smallerprotein strands and voids than sorghum buggelatin. Ice cream was made by using 0.5% insect’sgelatine and compared with that made using 0.5%commercial gelatine as stabilizing agent. The properties of the obtained ice cream produced using insects gelatine were found to be acceptable for the panelists, and no significant differences between ice cream made using insect gelatine when compared with that made using commercial gelatine in their general preferences The behavior of the crude Sorghum bug oil during deep-frying of par-fried potatoes was studied with regard to chemical, physical, and sensory parameters, such as the content ofFFA,

Stress Degradation Studies on Lisinopril Dihydrate Using Modified Reverse Phase High Performance Liquid Chromatography  [PDF]
Elsadig H. K. Adam
American Journal of Analytical Chemistry (AJAC) , 2014, DOI: 10.4236/ajac.2014.55039
Abstract: A simple, precise, accurate and sensitive reverse phase high performance liquid chromatographic method for simultaneous estimation of lisinopril dihydrate and its degradation products occuring under different ICH prescribed stress conditions has been modified. Drug was resolved on a C18 column, utilizing modified mobile phase of tetra butyl ammonium hydroxide solution and acetonitrile. Ultra violet detection was carried out at 210 nm. The method was modified with respect to linearity, precision, accuracy, selectivity, specificity and ruggedness. The results obtained revealed that lisinopril dihydrate was an active product slightly changed under stress conditions.
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