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Search Results: 1 - 10 of 8500 matches for " Timothy Allen Dy "
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Relating Carbon Dioxide Emissions with Macroeconomic Variables in the Philippine Setting  [PDF]
Rosalina Palanca-Tan, Timothy Allen Dy, Angela Tan
Low Carbon Economy (LCE) , 2016, DOI: 10.4236/lce.2016.71002
Abstract: Using cointegration and error correction modeling techniques, this paper examines the dynamics of carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions in relation to economic growth, energy consumption, trade openness, urbanization and foreign direct investments in the case of the Philippines. The study finds that 1) economic growth and CO2 emissions have a significant positive linear relationship, suggesting that income growth policies must be subject to reasonably stringent environmental constraints related to CO2 emissions; 2) CO2 emissions are inelastic with respect to energy use in the short run, but its response becomes elastic in the long-run; and 3) CO2 emissions have a positive elasticity with respect to FDI which conforms with the Pollution Haven hypothesis.
FPGA Implementation for GMM-Based Speaker Identification
Phaklen EhKan,Timothy Allen,Steven F. Quigley
International Journal of Reconfigurable Computing , 2011, DOI: 10.1155/2011/420369
Abstract: In today's society, highly accurate personal identification systems are required. Passwords or pin numbers can be forgotten or forged and are no longer considered to offer a high level of security. The use of biological features, biometrics, is becoming widely accepted as the next level for security systems. Biometric-based speaker identification is a method of identifying persons from their voice. Speaker-specific characteristics exist in speech signals due to different speakers having different resonances of the vocal tract. These differences can be exploited by extracting feature vectors such as Mel-Frequency Cepstral Coefficients (MFCCs) from the speech signal. A well-known statistical modelling process, the Gaussian Mixture Model (GMM), then models the distribution of each speaker's MFCCs in a multidimensional acoustic space. The GMM-based speaker identification system has features that make it promising for hardware acceleration. This paper describes the hardware implementation for classification of a text-independent GMM-based speaker identification system. The aim was to produce a system that can perform simultaneous identification of large numbers of voice streams in real time. This has important potential applications in security and in automated call centre applications. A speedup factor of ninety was achieved compared to a software implementation on a standard PC. 1. Introduction Speaker recognition is an important branch of speech processing. It is the process of automatically recognizing who is speaking by using speaker-specific information included in the speech waveform. It is receiving increasing attention due to its practical value and has applications ranging from police work to automation of call centers. Speaker recognition can be classified into speaker identification (discovering identity) and speaker verification (authenticating a claim of identity). A closed-set speaker identification system selects the speaker in the training set who best matches the unknown speaker. Open-set speaker identification allows for the possibility that the unknown speaker may not exist in the training set; thus, an additional decision alternative is required for the unknown speaker who does not match any of the models in the training set [1]. Reconfigurable computing systems use reconfigurable hardware to augment a CPU-based system. The application is decomposed into parts running on the CPU and parts running on the reconfigurable hardware, which is used to form a custom hardware accelerator for the portions of the algorithm that are capable of
Stability and Continuity in Robust Linear and Linear Semi-Infinite Optimization
Timothy C. Y. Chan,Philip Allen Mar
Mathematics , 2015,
Abstract: We consider the stability of Robust Optimization problems with respect to perturbations in their uncertainty sets. We focus on Linear Optimization problems, including those with a possibly infinite number of constraints, also known as Linear Semi-Infinite Optimization (LSIO) problems, and consider uncertainty in both the cost function and constraints. We prove Lipschitz continuity of the optimal value and {\epsilon}-approximate optimal solution set with respect to the Hausdorff distance between uncertainty sets and with an explicit Lipschitz constant that can be calculated. In addition, we prove closedness and upper semi-continuity for the optimal solution set mapping with respect to the uncertainty set.
Relationship between Changes in Cerebral Blood Flow with Symptoms of Acute Mountain Sickness in Men Repeatedly Exposed to Simulated High Altitude  [PDF]
Peter Ondru?, Roman Alberty, Timothy Lyons, Stephen Muza, Vincent Echavé, Jacques Poisson, Allen Cymerman
Advances in Physical Education (APE) , 2017, DOI: 10.4236/ape.2017.71005
Abstract:
Objective: To study the relationship between changes in the cerebral blood flow (CBF) velocity with symptoms of acute mountain sickness (AMS) during simulated high altitude. Research Design and Methods: Mean middle arterial cerebral flow velocity (MCAv) was assessed by transcranial Doppler sonography in 8 healthy lowland male adults aged 20 - 24 yrs before and after 6 h and 48 h at simulated altitude corresponding to 4572 m. The same study was repeated three weeks later in the same subjects. End-tidal pCO2 (ETCO2) and arterial oxygen saturation (SaO2) were measured by standardized procedures. AMS symptoms were recorded using the modified environmental symptoms questionnaire after 6 h and 48 h exposure to calculate the mean score of cerebral (AMS-C) symptoms. Results: Mean MCAv significantly increased with high altitude (HA) by 4% at 6 h HA and 24% at 48 h HA (P < 0.05) compared to sea-level values. We observed a substantial inter-subject variance in MCAv changes, especially in the first hours upon altitude exposure. Within first 2 days, we found a moderate positive correlation between MCAv with decreased ETCO2 (mean ± SD 32 ± 4 mmHg; r = 0.47, P < 0.05), and a weak negative correlation of MCAv with a similar low SaO2 (77% ± 8%; r = - 0.43, P < 0.05). Five of the 10 original subjects developed symptoms of AMS; however, AMS-C scores decreased (P = 0.08) with increased duration of exposure (6 h HA 0.91 ± 1.09 vs 48 h HA 0.39 ± 0.40). No differences in AMS-C scores were observed when subjects with and without increased MCAv were compared at 6 h HA and 48 h HA. Furthermore, there was no correlation between changes in neither absolute nor relative MCAv and AMS-C scores. Severity of AMS symptoms coincided well with reduction in SaO2 (r = - 0.55, P < 0.05). Conclusion: Our results suggest that there is a lack of relationship between changes in CBF velocity with symptoms of AMS, and that a substantial inter-subject variance exists in the CBF response to high altitude exposure.
Bilateral Accessory Breast: A Case Report
DY Buowari
Jos Journal of Medicine , 2012,
Abstract: Accessory breast is a relatively rare conduction, which is commoner in females than males. Most of them do not cause any discomforting symptoms but cosmetic embarrassment especially to a woman in the presence of her partner. Case Summary: A 23-year-old postpartum woman is presented who was managed for bilateral accessory breast at a district hospital. The accessory breasts were excised under ketamine anaesthesia. Conclusion: The treatment of accessory breast is excision because all disease conditions that affect normal breast can also affect accessory breast including malignant transformation.
Radiata pine response to tillage, fertilization, and weed control in Chile
ALBAUGH,TIMOTHY J; RUBILAR,RAFAEL; ALVAREZ,JOSE; ALLEN,H. LEE;
Bosque (Valdivia) , 2004, DOI: 10.4067/S0717-92002004000200002
Abstract: four radiata pine (pinus radiata) stands were established on recent volcanic ash, volcanic sands, old volcanic ash and fluvial sedimentation in a granitic zone in chile in 2000. weed control (none or two year banded), fertilization (1.5 g b per tree or 150 g diammonium phosphate+1.5 g b per tree), soil tillage (shovel or subsoil), and all combinations of the individual treatments were applied with four replications at each site and analyzed as a split plot design with soil tillage as the main plots and weed control and fertilization as the sub plots. treated plot area was at least 0.4 ha with 10 m buffers between all plots. height, root collar diameter and diameter at breast height were measured three years after planting and foliar nutrient concentrations were measured two years after planting. all four sites exhibited positive growth responses to weed control with an average response to weed control across all sites of 3.1 cm in diameter and 1 m in height after three years. a positive height response (10 cm) to fertilization was observed on the volcanic sands. however, foliar nutrient analysis indicated that the added fertilizers may not have been available to the crop trees due to the timing of application. subsoil tillage improved growth on the volcanic sand and the fluvial sedimentation sites, however the magnitude of response was 95% and 42% less than the response to weed control on these same sites, respectively. weed control and subsoil tillage reduced variability in height at all sites. we hypothesized that early rotation growth gain from weed control would be maintained throughout the rotation (type b) on old volcanic ash and the fluvial sedimentation sites while the growth gain on the recent volcanic ash and the volcanic sand sites would be partially or completely lost by the end of the rotation (type c). certainly, weed control is recommended for the site types represented in these trials. fertilization along with weed control is recommended on the volca
Radiata pine response to tillage, fertilization, and weed control in Chile Respuesta a la preparación de suelos, control de malezas y fertilización en plantaciones de Pinus radiata en Chile
TIMOTHY J ALBAUGH,RAFAEL RUBILAR,JOSE ALVAREZ,H. LEE ALLEN
Bosque (Valdivia) , 2004,
Abstract: Four radiata pine (Pinus radiata) stands were established on recent volcanic ash, volcanic sands, old volcanic ash and fluvial sedimentation in a granitic zone in Chile in 2000. Weed control (none or two year banded), fertilization (1.5 g B per tree or 150 g diammonium phosphate+1.5 g B per tree), soil tillage (shovel or subsoil), and all combinations of the individual treatments were applied with four replications at each site and analyzed as a split plot design with soil tillage as the main plots and weed control and fertilization as the sub plots. Treated plot area was at least 0.4 ha with 10 m buffers between all plots. Height, root collar diameter and diameter at breast height were measured three years after planting and foliar nutrient concentrations were measured two years after planting. All four sites exhibited positive growth responses to weed control with an average response to weed control across all sites of 3.1 cm in diameter and 1 m in height after three years. A positive height response (10 cm) to fertilization was observed on the volcanic sands. However, foliar nutrient analysis indicated that the added fertilizers may not have been available to the crop trees due to the timing of application. Subsoil tillage improved growth on the volcanic sand and the fluvial sedimentation sites, however the magnitude of response was 95% and 42% less than the response to weed control on these same sites, respectively. Weed control and subsoil tillage reduced variability in height at all sites. We hypothesized that early rotation growth gain from weed control would be maintained throughout the rotation (Type B) on old volcanic ash and the fluvial sedimentation sites while the growth gain on the recent volcanic ash and the volcanic sand sites would be partially or completely lost by the end of the rotation (Type C). Certainly, weed control is recommended for the site types represented in these trials. Fertilization along with weed control is recommended on the volcanic sands. Additional study managing the timing of fertilizer application is indicated as the applied fertilizers may not have been available to the crop trees. Subsoil tillage may not be needed on these site types however secondary benefits like improved traffic-ability and ease in planting resulting from subsoil tillage need to be quantified to better evaluate subsoil tillage benefits. Se iniciaron en el a o 2000 ensayos para investigar la respuesta a la preparación de suelos (pala vs. subsolado), control de malezas (sin control vs. dos a os en bandas) y fertilización (1,5 g de B por planta
Dark Experiments: From Black Holes to Cosmic Rays  [PDF]
Allen D. Allen
Journal of Modern Physics (JMP) , 2012, DOI: 10.4236/jmp.2012.39125
Abstract: Some nagging questions in modern physics can be resolved rigorously using a basic mathematical formalism, albeit with the need to admit that non-isomorphic realities arise to various degrees in a given universe. Let U=(m', m\") be an unordered pair of distinct massive objects in different reference frames. A dark experiment is an ordering u, mv> of the elements of U, either or, exclusively, , where the left-hand member of the ordered pair is called the observer, and where there exists a 1-to-1 mapping f:{u}→{events}, mv> , such that both elements of an ordered pair in a dark experiment agree on the events that unfold in the experiment. However, since , it follows that f()≠f(). This describes non-isomorphic realities where in both elements of each ordered pair mapping two distinct sets of unfolding events will agree on their respective events. Consequently, there is an inherent limitation on what can be determined directly from experimentation. Examples arise in the context of the Hawking information paradox, relativistic time travel, and cosmic ray experiments.
State of the Art in Cardiac Intervention: A Case Report  [PDF]
Allen D. Allen
International Journal of Clinical Medicine (IJCM) , 2012, DOI: 10.4236/ijcm.2012.37112
Abstract:

The first acute myocardial infarction (MI) of an elderly male was determined through angiography to be due to an infarct of the circumflex artery. The angiogram also revealed chronic occlusion and diffuse disease of the left anterior descending artery (LAD). This had been compensated for by collateral circulation from the right coronary artery. Since the patient had no prior history of coronary artery disease, the chronic and collateralized disease of the LAD was presumed to be stable and this artery was not treated. Due to a history of aspirin intolerance a bare metal stent was implanted in the circumflex artery. Within hours after stenting the patient had a second acute MI. Despite no change in the angiogram, the EKG suggested that the LAD was the source of the second MI. Indeed, a drug-eluting stent implanted in the LAD resolved the patient’s signs and symptoms and he was discharged with a favorable outcome. The surprising second MI and the inconsistent stenting illustrate that when the unexpected occurs, there is no substitute for the judgment of a skilled clinician.

Finite Gravity: From the Big Bang to Dark Matter  [PDF]
Allen D. Allen
International Journal of Astronomy and Astrophysics (IJAA) , 2013, DOI: 10.4236/ijaa.2013.32020
Abstract:

The purpose of the present paper is to assume that the expanding spacetime of our cosmos was created by the big bang. It then follows that there exists a finite instantaneous radial extent dRU to spacetime as observed from anywhere in spacetime by comoving observers. The consequences for gravity are explored by first considering the scalar field of a central mass that defines the dynamic properties of a circular orbit for each radius RdRU under the postulate of weak equivalence. These properties include an orbital velocity and an escape velocity. For a central mass of galactic proportion, the escape velocity becomes large even at cosmological distances. By considering the dynamics of a smaller mass occupying the last orbit, we find that the established laws of physics lead to different rotation curves than they do when applied to the solar system. Since galactic rotation curves reveal the existence of dark matter, this is anticipated to have some consequences for our understanding of dark matter.

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