oalib

Publish in OALib Journal

ISSN: 2333-9721

APC: Only $99

Submit

Any time

2019 ( 15 )

2018 ( 62 )

2017 ( 60 )

2016 ( 83 )

Custom range...

Search Results: 1 - 10 of 30960 matches for " Thomas "
All listed articles are free for downloading (OA Articles)
Page 1 /30960
Display every page Item
Global Chemical Leasing Award 2010  [PDF]
Thomas Jakl
Technology and Investment (TI) , 2011, DOI: 10.4236/ti.2011.21003
Abstract: The Global Chemical Leasing Award was presented for the first time in March 2010 to organizations, companies and individuals for their outstanding efforts to enhance the visibility of Chemical Leasing around the world and reward successful Chemical Leasing initiatives and implementation. Chemical Leasing is the new business model in the field of sound use of chemicals, initiated and subsidized by the Austrian Federal Ministry for Agriculture, Forestry, the Environment and Water Management and jointly promoted with UNIDO. The decisive new aspect of this business model, which distinguishes itself from the traditional supplier-user relation, is to make the service performed by the chemical substance the basis of payment for the business operation, e.g. according to cleaned area, treated number of pieces, or performed hours of operation (= unit of payment). In this way an efficient use of chemicals is in the interest of all parties involved. The award was jointly organized by UNIDO and the Austrian Federal Ministry for Agriculture, Forestry, the Environment and Water Management. Organizations, companies and individuals worldwide were able to take part in the competition. The cases of the winners are described in detail and show the applicability of Chemical Leasing to the different industrial processes. Among these are water clarification and oil dehydration in Colombia, mineral water and beverage production in Serbia, oil & gas exploration and production and specifically deep gas field development projects in different places, industrial cleaning with solvents in Austria and textile dyeing in India.
The Effect of Different Movement Exercises on Cognitive and Motor Abilities  [PDF]
Monika Thomas
Advances in Physical Education (APE) , 2012, DOI: 10.4236/ape.2012.24030
Abstract: The influence of physical activity on motor and cognitive performance has been approved in several studies. However, it is still unclear which functions are affected, and why. It also remains unknown what type of physical training is best suitable. The present study focuses on special movement aspects based on the Brain Gym? program. Four groups of subjects (n = 64) participated in two experiments with pre-post intervention design. In experiment 1 two groups of subjects were exposed to a sensorimotor adaptation study design by executing center out pointing movements under distorted visual feedback conditions with their dominant and non-dominant arm to test for intermanual transfer (IMT) as pre- and posttest. The intervention in both groups consisted of specified movement exercises with the right and left extremities: participants of Experimental group executed movements crossing the body midline and participants of Control group movements without crossing the body midline. Results showed a decreased retention of adaptation but larger IMT for Experimental group during posttest. We conclude that movements crossing the body midline impede retention but enhance IMT of sensorimotor adaptation. A potential relationship to an improvement of communication between the cerebral hemispheres evoked by the movement exercises crossing the body midline is rather speculative. In experiment 2 two groups were exposed to the d2-test measuring concentration and attention and a dice-test testing for visual-spatial abilities as pre- and posttest. The interventions were similar to experiment 1. Results yielded no differences between groups such that different effects of both interventions could not have been shown.
Russell’s Bismarck: Acquaintance Theory and Historical Distance  [PDF]
Thomas Aiello
Advances in Historical Studies (AHS) , 2013, DOI: 10.4236/ahs.2013.21003
Abstract: The role of acquaintance in Bertrand Russell’s theory of descriptions is antithetical and, indeed, antagonistic toward the practice and assumptions of history. In his 1910 paper “Knowledge by Acquaintance and Knowledge by Description,” Russell attempts to reconcile direct acquaintance (or its inability to determine the personal self of others) with a descriptive knowledge that is both logical and personal. Russell tries to reconcile the internal and external worlds, attempting to explain access to impersonal knowledge inside a framework that doesn’t allow acquaintance with physical objects—he distorts the historical space between researcher and subject. In so doing, he argues for the superiority of acquaintance as an arbiter of knowledge, narrowly avoiding solipsism and wrongly devaluing the most basic of historiograhpical assumptions. His conception creates false historical goals and distorts the space of historical distance, illustrated in this paper through the American slavery studies of Herbert Aptheker, Stanley Elkins, and Kenneth Stampp.
Glucose initially inhibits and later stimulates blood ROS generation  [PDF]
Thomas Stief
Journal of Diabetes Mellitus (JDM) , 2013, DOI: 10.4236/jdm.2013.31003
Abstract:

Background: Glucose is the main substrate for the generation of NADPH, the cofactor of the oxidative burst enzyme NADPH-oxidase of blood neutrophils. Changes in blood glucose are thus expected to modify the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). The new blood ROS generation assay (BRGA) quantifies ROS changes induced by blood glucose concentrations as they are found in diabetes mellitus. Material and Methods: Citrated or EDTA blood of 6 healthy donors were analyzed in the BRGA: 10 μl sample in black polystyrene F-microwells (Brand 781608) were incubated in triplicate with 125 μl Hanks’ balanced salt solution, 40 μl 0 - 200 mM glucose in 0.9% NaCl (final added conc.: 0 - 41 mM; final basal glucose conc.: about4 mM), 10 μl5 mMluminol, and 10 μl zymosan A (final conc.: 1.9 μg/ml) in 0.9% NaCl. The plates were measured within 0 - 250 min (37) in a photons-multiplyer microtiter plate luminometer (LUmo) with an integration time of 1 s. Results: Up to about 30 min reaction time the mean ROS generation was 50% inhibited by about1 mMadded glucose (= approx. IC50). At ≥80 min reaction time (possibly necessary for full phosphorylation of glucose to glucose-6-phosphate (G6P), the substrate metabolized by G6P-dehydrogenase to generate NADPH, the cofactor of the NADPH-oxidase) the mean ROS generation approximately doubled at about1 mMadded glucose (= approx. SC200) in citrated blood. Discussion: Elevated glucose concentrations not only increase systemic thrombin generation, they can also diminish cellular fibrinolysis and increase systemic inflammation, resulting in a chronic pro-thrombotic state. The fascinating importance of NADPH-oxidases not only in phagocytes but also in the beta cells of pancreas points towards a new pathogenesis explication of diabetes mellitus type 1: whatever stimulus (e.g. a pancreas-tropic virus) could activate the beta cell’s autodestructive NADPH-oxidase.

Regulating Liquidity Risks within “Institutional Protection Schemes”  [PDF]
Thomas Stern
Beijing Law Review (BLR) , 2014, DOI: 10.4236/blr.2014.53020
Abstract: During an early phase of the financial crisis (2007), many financial institutionsin spite of adequate capital levelsfaced heavy difficulties because they didn’t manage their liquidity profile in a prudent manner. Suddenly the crisis reminded the respective sector on the importance of liquidity to the proper functioning of financial markets. In front of the times of crisis, asset markets were broad and deep, funding was readily available at low cost. The quick change in market conditions showed how fast liquidity can dry up, and that illiquidity can endure for an extended period of time. The banks faced severe stress, which required actions by central banks toone the one handkeep alive both the functioning of capital and money markets andon the other hand support individual banks or banking groups, which lost their most important funding sources. The impact of a liquidity crisis broadly differs among jurisdiction, markets and concrete market participants. Empirically banks, which were very reliant on interbank funding and closely connected to other financial institutions, suffered during the crisis more than e.g. banks with a business model in favour of funding by retail deposits and holding sufficient Liquidity buffers. Especially in Austria and Germany, there is a phenomenon rising of so called “Institutional Protection Schemes” (in the following: “IPS”). The establishment of an IPS means the foundation of a “contractual or statutory liability arrangement which protects those institutions and in particular ensures their liquidity and solvency to avoid bankruptcy where necessary” (Article 113 para 7 CRR). Currently it seems that a huge part of Austrian banks (about 800 institutions in total) will apply for a membership in an IPS. Given that banks within the same IPS are strongly connected and the role of an IPS is to ensure the ongoing solvency and liquidity of its member institutions, such banking networks may create special needs for liquidity risk management and supervision. This paper deals with the question whether IPS’ are sufficiently regulated by CRR and CRD IV, focusing on the topic liquidity and liquidity risk. As mentioned, the basic notion of Basel III focuses on banking groups,
The Atom Model of Helium and of Neon Based on the Theorem of Niels Bohr  [PDF]
Thomas Allmendinger
Journal of Applied Mathematics and Physics (JAMP) , 2018, DOI: 10.4236/jamp.2018.66108
Abstract: In a previous, primary treatise of the author the mathematical description of electron trajectories in the excited states of the H-atom could be demonstrated, starting from Bohr’s original model but modifying it three dimensionally. In a subsequent treatise, Bohr’s theorem of an unalterable angular momentum h/2π, determining the ground state of the H-atom, was revealed as an inducement by the—unalterable—electron spin. Starting from this presumption, a model of the H2-molecule could be created which exhibits well-defined electron trajectories, and which enabled computing the bond length precisely. In the present treatise, Bohr’s theorem is adapted to the atom models of helium and of neon. But while this was feasible exactly in the case of helium, the neon atom turned out to be too complex for a mathematical modelling. Nevertheless, a rough ball-and-stick model can be presented, assuming electron rings instead of electron clouds, which in the outer shell are orientated as a tetrahedron. It entails the principal statement that the neon atom does not represent a static construction with constant electron distances and velocities, but a pulsating dynamic one with permanently changing internal distances. Thus, the helium atom marks the limit for precisely describing an atom, whereby at and under this limit such a precise description is feasible, being also demonstrated in the author’s previous work. This contradicts the conventional quantum mechanical theory which claims that such a—locally and temporally—precise description of any atom or molecule structure is generally not possible, also not for the H2-molecule, and not even for the H-atom.
The Spherical Atom Model of Helium Based on the Theorem of Niels Bohr  [PDF]
Thomas Allmendinger
Journal of Applied Mathematics and Physics (JAMP) , 2019, DOI: 10.4236/jamp.2019.71015
Abstract: Proceeding from the double-cone model of Helium, based on Bohr’s theorem and recently published in[13], a spherical modification could be made by introducing a second electron rotation which exhibits a rotation axis perpendicular to the first one. Thereby, each rotation is induced by the spin of one electron. Thus the trajectory of each electron represents the superposition of two separate orbits, while each electron is always positioned opposite to the other one. Both electron velocities are equal and constant, due to their mutual coupling. The 3D electron orbits could be 2D-graphed by separately projecting them on the x/z-plane of a Cartesian coordinate system, and by plotting the evaluated x-, y- and z-values versus the rotation angle. Due to the decreased electron velocity, the resulting radius is twice the size of the one in the double-cone model. Even if distinct evidence is not feasible, e.g. by means of X-ray crystallographic data, this modified model appears to be the more plausible one, due to its higher cloud coverage, and since it comes closer to Kimball’s charge cloud model.
On the Temperature Dependent Excitation and Reflection Spectra of Ln3Al5O12:Ce3+ Ceramics (Ln = Y, Lu) for White LEDs  [PDF]
Thomas Jansen, Thomas Jüstel
Materials Sciences and Applications (MSA) , 2014, DOI: 10.4236/msa.2014.514110
Abstract: Yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG) and Lutetium aluminum garnet (LuAG) doped with Ce3+ are widely applied phosphor powders or ceramics for the conversion of blue into green to yellow light in the rapidly expanding market of white light emitting high power LEDs. Surprisingly, the temperature dependent reflection and excitation spectra of these well-established materials have not been investigated until today. In this work, we report the temperature dependence of the reflection and excitation spectra of Ce3+ doped YAG and LuAG in the temperature range from 300 to 800 K.
Validation of the Physical Education Teacher’s Efficacy for Standards-Based Instruction (ESBI) Scale  [PDF]
Matthew T. Buns, Katherine Thomas Thomas
Advances in Physical Education (APE) , 2015, DOI: 10.4236/ape.2015.53019
Abstract: The main purpose of this study was to determine the validity and reliability of the Efficacy for Standards-Based Instruction (ESBI) scale, developed by the current investigators, and to compare the ESBI with two other self-efficacy scales that had been used in physical education (TESPE, Chase, Lirgg, & Carson, 2001;TSES, Tschannen-Moran & Hoy, 2001). The ESBI, TESPE, and TSES were administered to 60 physical education teachers from 16 school districts in Iowa. Cronbach’s alpha (internal consistency) for the ESBI was .96, and the Equal-Length Spearman Brown split-half coefficient inferred good reliability (r = .90). The ESBI demonstrated better validity and reliability than the previously developed TESPE (Cronbach’s alpha = .89; Spearman Brown split-half coefficient = .86) and TSES (Cronbach’s alpha = .84; Spearman Brown split-half coefficient = .79). As a test of concurrent validity for ESBI, Pearson’s product moment correlations were performed to test the extent to which the total efficacy scores and subscales were related. The ESBI, TESPE, and TSES all had significant positive correlations with each other (p < .01). Validation of the three self- efficacy scales was also performed using the ranked Physical Education Curriculum Analysis Tool (PECAT) score for each district as an independent measure. The ESBI scale produced a low but significant correlation (r = .28, p < .05) with PECAT, but TSES and TESPE were not significant. This suggested that ESBI was more related to standards and benchmarks than the other two measures. These results indicate that the ESBI has shown good (versus TESPE) or better (versus TESES) validity and reliability compared with previous work. This work also supports Bandura’s (1986) notion of specificity for self-efficacy.
Urban Soundscape Informational Quantization: Validation Using a Comparative Approach  [PDF]
Philippe Woloszyn, Thomas Leduc
Journal of Service Science and Management (JSSM) , 2010, DOI: 10.4236/jssm.2010.34049
Abstract: Through interaction with environmental parameters such as light or sound, urban and architectural spaces generate ambiences with identifiable characteristics. This notion of ambiences is related to the human being position through its perception of environmental physical phenomenon during a pedestrian walk. Presented work aims to evaluate, so as to characterize, the impact of sound ambiences (soundscape) onto an urban pedestrian pathway using GIS spatial dynamical mapping. To carry out this scheme, our research work within AMBIOFLUX project concerns spatial interaction between sound ambience (soundscape) and man urban spatial trajectory (soundwalk). Spatial impression of soundsources or soundmarks has to be both defined through acoustical measurement and perception informational evaluation. The remainder of this paper is dedicated to the evaluation’s methodology of the pedestrian pathway’s acoustic fingerprint using the GearScape spatial formalism described thereafter. Preliminary results we have obtained will also be presented and validated.
Page 1 /30960
Display every page Item


Home
Copyright © 2008-2017 Open Access Library. All rights reserved.