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Search Results: 1 - 10 of 31038 matches for " Thomas Stuhr "
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Effectiveness and tolerability of a fixed-dose combination of olmesartan and amlodipine in clinical practice
Peter Bramlage, Wolf-Peter Wolf, Thomas Stuhr, et al
Vascular Health and Risk Management , 2010, DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/VHRM.S13441
Abstract: tiveness and tolerability of a fixed-dose combination of olmesartan and amlodipine in clinical practice Original Research (3930) Total Article Views Authors: Peter Bramlage, Wolf-Peter Wolf, Thomas Stuhr, et al Published Date August 2010 Volume 2010:6 Pages 803 - 811 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/VHRM.S13441 Peter Bramlage1, Wolf-Peter Wolf2, Thomas Stuhr2, Eva-Maria Fronk3, Wolfhard Erdlenbruch2, Reinhard Ketelhut4, Roland E Schmieder5 1Institute for Cardiovascular Pharmacology and Epidemiology, Mahlow; 2Daiichi Sankyo Deutschland GmbH, Munich, Germany; 3Daiichi Sankyo Europe GmbH, Munich, Germany; 4Department of Sports Medicine, Universit tsklinikum Berlin; 5Department of Nephrology and Hypertension, University Hospital of Erlangen, Germany Objectives: To assess the efficacy and tolerability of a fixed-dose combination of olmesartan and amlodipine in an unselected population of patients in primary care and to compare the results with recent randomized controlled trial evidence. Methods: A multicenter, noninterventional, noncontrolled observational study with 8241 hypertensive patients seen by 2187 physicians in daily practice. Blood pressure (BP) reduction, comorbid disease, pharmacotherapy, and tolerability were documented over a 12–18-week observational period. Results: Patients had a mean age of 62.8 ± 11.8 years (48.1% female), and 74.8% had at least one comorbid risk factor or condition. In total, 51.3% received olmesartan-amlodipine 20/5 mg, 30.6% received 40/5 mg, and 17.9% received 40/10 mg at baseline, mostly because of lack of efficacy on prior antihypertensive therapy (73.8%). BP at baseline was 161.8 ± 16.6/93.6 ± 10.2 mmHg (39.8% had Grade 2 hypertension), and the observed BP reduction was -29.0 ± 17.1/-13.5 ± 10.9 mmHg (P < 0.0001), with a significant correlation between BP at baseline and BP reduction (Spearman’s Rho -0.811 for systolic BP and -0.759 for diastolic BP). BP reduction appeared to be dependent on dose and prior antihypertensive therapy, but not on age, gender, body mass index, duration of hypertension, or the presence of diabetes. At the final visit, 69.4% (4.3% at baseline) were controlled (<140/90 mmHg). Adverse drug reactions were observed in 2.76% of the study population; 94.25% of these adverse drug reactions were judged as nonserious events, and 31.5% of all adverse drug reactions reported were peripheral edema. Conclusion: The fixed-dose olmesartan-amlodipine combination was effective and well tolerated in an unselected population of patients in primary care practice. These results confirm prior randomized controlled trial evidence.
Effectiveness and tolerability of a fixed-dose combination of olmesartan and amlodipine in clinical practice
Peter Bramlage,Wolf-Peter Wolf,Thomas Stuhr,et al
Vascular Health and Risk Management , 2010,
Abstract: Peter Bramlage1, Wolf-Peter Wolf2, Thomas Stuhr2, Eva-Maria Fronk3, Wolfhard Erdlenbruch2, Reinhard Ketelhut4, Roland E Schmieder51Institute for Cardiovascular Pharmacology and Epidemiology, Mahlow; 2Daiichi Sankyo Deutschland GmbH, Munich, Germany; 3Daiichi Sankyo Europe GmbH, Munich, Germany; 4Department of Sports Medicine, Universit tsklinikum Berlin; 5Department of Nephrology and Hypertension, University Hospital of Erlangen, GermanyObjectives: To assess the efficacy and tolerability of a fixed-dose combination of olmesartan and amlodipine in an unselected population of patients in primary care and to compare the results with recent randomized controlled trial evidence.Methods: A multicenter, noninterventional, noncontrolled observational study with 8241 hypertensive patients seen by 2187 physicians in daily practice. Blood pressure (BP) reduction, comorbid disease, pharmacotherapy, and tolerability were documented over a 12–18-week observational period.Results: Patients had a mean age of 62.8 ± 11.8 years (48.1% female), and 74.8% had at least one comorbid risk factor or condition. In total, 51.3% received olmesartan-amlodipine 20/5 mg, 30.6% received 40/5 mg, and 17.9% received 40/10 mg at baseline, mostly because of lack of efficacy on prior antihypertensive therapy (73.8%). BP at baseline was 161.8 ± 16.6/93.6 ± 10.2 mmHg (39.8% had Grade 2 hypertension), and the observed BP reduction was -29.0 ± 17.1/-13.5 ± 10.9 mmHg (P < 0.0001), with a significant correlation between BP at baseline and BP reduction (Spearman’s Rho -0.811 for systolic BP and -0.759 for diastolic BP). BP reduction appeared to be dependent on dose and prior antihypertensive therapy, but not on age, gender, body mass index, duration of hypertension, or the presence of diabetes. At the final visit, 69.4% (4.3% at baseline) were controlled (<140/90 mmHg). Adverse drug reactions were observed in 2.76% of the study population; 94.25% of these adverse drug reactions were judged as nonserious events, and 31.5% of all adverse drug reactions reported were peripheral edema.Conclusion: The fixed-dose olmesartan-amlodipine combination was effective and well tolerated in an unselected population of patients in primary care practice. These results confirm prior randomized controlled trial evidence.Keywords: blood pressure, cardiovascular risk, antihypertensive treatment, observation
Electronic excitations of a single molecule contacted in a three-terminal configuration
Edgar A. Osorio,Kevin O'Neill,Maarten Wegewijs,Nicolai Stuhr-Hansen,Jens Paaske,Thomas Bjornholm,Herre S. J. van der Zant
Physics , 2007, DOI: 10.1021/nl0715802
Abstract: Low-temperature three-terminal transport measurements through a thiol end-capped Pi -conjugated molecule have been carried out. Electronic excitations, including zero and finite-bias Kondo-effects have been observed and studied as a function of magnetic field. Using a simplified two-orbital model we have accounted for the spin and the electronic configuration of the first four charge states of the molecule. The charge-dependent couplings to gate, source and drain electrodes suggest a scenario in which charges and spins are localized at the ends of the molecule, close to the electrodes.
Esophageal ulcer and alendronate
Ferrari Junior, Angelo Paulo;Domingues, Sérgio Hernani Stuhr;
Sao Paulo Medical Journal , 1998, DOI: 10.1590/S1516-31801998000600010
Abstract: objective: to describe a case of esophageal ulcer associated with the use of alendronate. case report: this is the fifth case ever described in the literature according to our bibliographic review. in our patient, the association between the drug and the esophageal lesions was masked by the presence of a hiatal hernia, potentially a cause of the esophageal lesion. the persistence of the lesions despite high doses of anti-reflux therapy called attention to the possibility of the relationship. the esophageal lesion healed soon after suspension of alendronate. discussion: the authors present a review of the literature and point to the need for diagnostic investigation, to suspend such a drug from patients who experience dyspeptic symptoms while using it.
4-Bromoselenoanisole
Henning Osholm Sørensen,Nicolai Stuhr-Hansen
Acta Crystallographica Section E , 2009, DOI: 10.1107/s160053680902296x
Abstract: The title compound, 1-bromo-4-methylselenobenzene, C7H7BrSe, was prepared by methylation of 4-bromoselenophenolate with methyl iodide, and crystals suitable for structure determination were obtained by sublimation. The molecule is essentially planar; the Se—Me bond is rotated by only 2.59 (19)° out of the least-squares plane of the benzene ring. The most pronounced intermolecular interactions are two hydrogen bonds of the type C—H...π, which determine a herring-bone pattern in the crystal packing.
Effect of ocean acidification on the fatty acid composition of a natural plankton community
E. Leu,M. Daase,K. G. Schulz,A. Stuhr
Biogeosciences (BG) & Discussions (BGD) , 2013, DOI: 10.5194/bg-10-1143-2013
Abstract: The effect of ocean acidification on the fatty acid composition of a natural plankton community in the Arctic was studied in a large-scale mesocosm experiment, carried out in Kongsfjorden (Svalbard, Norway) at 79° N. Nine mesocosms of ~50 m3 each were exposed to 8 different pCO2 levels (from natural background conditions to ~1420 μatm), yielding pH values (on the total scale) from ~8.3 to 7.5. Inorganic nutrients were added on day 13. The phytoplankton development during this 30-day experiment passed three distinct phases: (1) prior to the addition of inorganic nutrients, (2) first bloom after nutrient addition, and (3) second bloom after nutrient addition. The fatty acid composition of the natural plankton community was analysed and showed, in general, high percentages of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs): 44–60% of total fatty acids. Positive correlations with pCO2 were found for most PUFAs during phases 2 and/or 3, with the exception of 20:5n3 (eicosapentaenoic acid, EPA), an important diatom marker. These correlations are probably linked to changes in taxonomic composition in response to pCO2. While diatoms (together with prasinophytes and haptophytes) increased during phase 3 mainly in the low and intermediate pCO2 treatments, dinoflagellates were favoured by high CO2 concentrations during the same time period. This is reflected in the development of group-specific fatty acid trophic markers. No indications were found for a generally detrimental effect of ocean acidification on the planktonic food quality in terms of essential fatty acids.
High tolerance of protozooplankton to ocean acidification in an Arctic coastal plankton community
N. Aberle,K. G. Schulz,A. Stuhr,A. Ludwig
Biogeosciences Discussions , 2012, DOI: 10.5194/bgd-9-13031-2012
Abstract: Impacts of ocean acidification (OA) on marine biota have been observed in a wide range of marine systems. We used a mesocosm approach to study the response of a high Arctic coastal protozooplankton (PZP in the following) community during the post-bloom period in the Kongsfjorden (Svalbard) to direct and indirect effects of high pCO2/low pH. We found almost no direct effects of OA on PZP composition and diversity. Both, the relative shares of ciliates and heterotrophic dinoflagellates as well as the taxonomic composition of protozoans remained unaffected by changes in pCO2/pH. The different pCO2 treatments did not have any effect on food availability and phytoplankton composition and thus no indirect effects e.g. on the total carrying capacity and phenology of PZP could be observed. Our data points at a high tolerance of this Arctic PZP community to changes in pCO2/pH. Future studies on the impact of OA on plankton communities should include PZP in order to test whether the observed low sensitivity of protozoans to OA is typical for coastal communities where changes in seawater pH occur frequently.
Effect of ocean acidification on the fatty acid composition of a natural plankton community
E. Leu,M. Daase,K. G. Schulz,A. Stuhr
Biogeosciences Discussions , 2012, DOI: 10.5194/bgd-9-8173-2012
Abstract: The effect of ocean acidification on the fatty acid composition of a natural plankton community in the Arctic was studied in a large-scale mesocosm experiment, carried out in Kongsfjorden (Svalbard, Norway) at 79° N. Nine mesocosms of ~50 cbm each were exposed to different pCO2 levels (from natural background conditions to ~1420 μatm), yielding pH values (on the total scale) from ~8.3 to 7.5. Inorganic nutrients were added on day 13. The phytoplankton development during this 30 days experiment passed three distinct phases: (1) prior to the addition of inorganic nutrients, (2) first bloom after nutrient addition, and (3) second bloom after nutrient addition. The fatty acid composition of the natural plankton community was analysed and showed, in general, high percentages of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs): 44–60% of total fatty acids. Positive correlations with pCO2 were found for most PUFAs during phases 2 and/or 3, with the exception of 20:5n3 (eicosapentaenoic acid, EPA), an important diatom marker. There are strong indications for these correlations being mediated indirectly through taxonomic changes and the natural development of the communities in the mesocosms exposed to different pCO2 levels. While diatoms increased during phase 3 mainly in the low and intermediate pCO2 treatments, dinoflagellates were favoured by high CO2 concentrations during the same time period. This is reflected in the development of group-specific fatty acid trophic markers. No indications were found for a generally detrimental effect of ocean acidification on the planktonic food quality in terms of essential fatty acids. The significant positive correlations between most PUFAs and pCO2 reflected treatment-dependent differences in the community composition between the mesocosms rather than a direct positive effect of pCO2 on specific fatty acids.
1,4-Bis(4-chlorophenylseleno)-2,5-dimethoxybenzene
Henning Osholm S?rensen,Nicolai Stuhr-Hansen
Acta Crystallographica Section E , 2009, DOI: 10.1107/s1600536808039469
Abstract: The title compound, C20H16Cl2O2Se2, utilizes the symmetry of the crystallographic inversion center. Molecular chains are formed through symmetric C—H...Cl interactions around inversion centers, mimicking the commonly observed symmetric hydrogen-bonded dimer pattern often found in carboxylic acids.
Hyperoxia increases the uptake of 5-fluorouracil in mammary tumors independently of changes in interstitial fluid pressure and tumor stroma
Ingrid Moen, Karl J Tronstad, Odd Kolmannskog, Gerd S Salvesen, Rolf K Reed, Linda EB Stuhr
BMC Cancer , 2009, DOI: 10.1186/1471-2407-9-446
Abstract: One group of tumor bearing rats was exposed to repeated hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) treatment (2 bar, pO2 = 2 bar, 4 exposures à 90 min), whereas one group was exposed to one single identical HBO treatment. Animals housed under normal atmosphere (1 bar, pO2 = 0.2 bar) served as controls. Three doses of 5FU were tested for dose response. Uptake of [3H]-5FU in the tumor was assessed, with special reference to factors that might have contributed, such as interstitial fluid pressure (Pif), collagen content, oxygen stress (measured as malondialdehyd levels), lymphatics and transcapillary transport in the tumors.The uptake of the cytostatic agent increases immediately after a single HBO treatment (more than 50%), but not 24 hours after the last repeated HBO treatment. Thus, the uptake is most likely related to the transient increase in oxygenation in the tumor tissue. Factors like tumor Pif and collagen content, which decreased significantly in the tumor interstitium after repeated HBO treatment, was without effect on the drug uptake.We showed that hyperoxia increases the uptake of [3H]-5FU in DMBA-induced mammary tumors per se, independently of changes in Pif, oxygen stress, collagen fibril density, or transendothelial transport alone. The mechanism by which such an uptake occur is still not elucidated, but it is clearly stimulated by elevated pO2.A tumor is comprised of cancer cells as well as stromal cells (fibroblasts, immune cells) that are embedded in an extracellular matrix (ECM) and nourished by vasculature. Because of irregular and tortuous tumor blood vessels with impaired blood flow and high proliferation rate, tumors have large hypoxic areas, especially in the central parts. It is now widely accepted that hypoxia induces tumor growth and enhances both radiation- and chemo-resistance of cancer cells [1].Inefficiency of chemotherapy can partly be explained by development of multidrug resistance to different chemotherapeutic agents. However, the causes of hypoxia-med
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