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Search Results: 1 - 10 of 448 matches for " Terje Strand "
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A cost-effect analysis of an intervention against radon in homes
Hein Stigum,Terje Strand,Per Magnus
Norsk Epidemiologi , 2009,
Abstract: Background Key words : Radon exposure, lung cancer, cost-effect analysis, attributable risk, models-mathematical: Radon is a radioactive gas that may leak into buildings from the ground. Radon exposure is a risk factor for lung cancer. An intervention against radon exposure in homes may consist of locating homes with high radon exposure (above 200 Bq m-3) and improving these, and of protecting future houses. The purpose of this paper is to calculate the costs and the effects of this intervention. Methods: We performed a cost-effect analysis from the perspective of the society, followed by an uncertainty and sensitivity analysis. The distribution of radon levels in Norwegian homes is lognormal with mean=74.5 Bq/m3, and 7.6% above 200 Bq/m3. Results:
The Influence of Optimistic Expectations and Negative Life Events on Somatic Symptoms among Adolescents: A One-Year Prospective Study  [PDF]
Terje Arnfinn Murberg
Psychology (PSYCH) , 2012, DOI: 10.4236/psych.2012.32018
Abstract: This study prospectively examined the main effect of optimism on subsequent somatic symptomatology as well as optimism as moderating factors in the link between negative life events and somatic symptoms in a sample of 198 (111 females, 87 males) students in a Norwegian senior high school. Results from the longitudinal multivariate analyses, indicated that the scores for optimism and negative life events were significantly associated with scores of somatic symptoms at time-point two (T2). Moreover, a significant Optimism × Negative life events interaction was found in predicting somatic symptoms. Implications of these findings are discussed.
Oslo government district bombing and Ut?ya island shooting July 22, 2011: The immediate prehospital emergency medical service response
Stephen JM Sollid, Rune Rimstad, Marius Rehn, Anders R Nakstad, Ann-Elin Tomlinson, Terje Strand, Hans Heimdal, Jan Nilsen, M?rten Sandberg, Collaborating group
Scandinavian Journal of Trauma, Resuscitation and Emergency Medicine , 2012, DOI: 10.1186/1757-7241-20-3
Abstract: A retrospective and observational study was conducted based on data from the EMS systems involved and the public domain. The study was approved by the Data Protection Official and was defined as a quality improvement project.We describe the timeline and logistics of the EMS response, focusing on alarm, dispatch, initial response, triage and evacuation. The scenes in the Oslo government district and at Ut?ya island are described separately.Many EMS units were activated and effectively used despite the occurrence of two geographically separate incidents within a short time frame. Important lessons were learned regarding triage and evacuation, patient flow and communication, the use of and need for emergency equipment and the coordination of helicopter EMS.On July 22, 2011, Norway was struck by two terrorist attacks. In the first attack, a car bomb exploded in the Oslo government district. The bomb comprised an ammonium nitrate/fuel oil (ANFO) mixture or "fertiliser bomb". Eight people were killed in the explosion. Two hours later, a lone gunman attacked a political youth camp on Ut?ya island, approximately 40 kilometres from Oslo, and killed 69 civilians. A single perpetrator carried out both attacks.The scale of the July 22, 2011 attacks and the resulting emergency medical service (EMS) response was unprecedented in Norway. The massive EMS response crossed jurisdictional lines and involved responders from multiple agencies throughout the region. In this paper, we describe the immediate prehospital EMS response to the July 22, 2011 attacks.The backbone of the Norwegian EMS is provided by on-call general practitioners (GPs) and ground ambulances [1]. According to national regulations, all ambulance units must be staffed by at least one certified emergency medical technician (EMT) [2]. However, most units are staffed by two EMTs, and in most urban systems, at least one EMT is a trained paramedic. The ambulance service is government-funded and organised under local healt
The alpha-2A adrenoceptor agonist guanfacine improves sustained attention and reduces overactivity and impulsiveness in an animal model of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD)
Terje Sagvolden
Behavioral and Brain Functions , 2006, DOI: 10.1186/1744-9081-2-41
Abstract: The present study tested behavioral effects of guanfacine at doses of 0.075, 0.15, 0.30 and 0.60 mg base/kg i.p. in both male SHRs and their controls, the Wistar Kyoto rat (WKY). ADHD-like behavior was tested with a visual discrimination task measuring overactivity, impulsiveness and inattentiveness.The striking impulsiveness, overactivity, and reduced sustained attention during baseline conditions in the SHR improved by treatment with guanfacine. The most pronounced improvement in SHR behavior was seen following the two highest doses (0.3 and 0.6 mg/kg) of guanfacine when SHR behaviors virtually normalized. The positive effects of the drug were most marked towards the end of the session.The results indicate that guanfacine improved poor noradrenergic modulation of neuronal circuits that involve the frontal lobes in an animal model of ADHD. The present results support the beneficial effects of guanfacine on ADHD behavior reported clinically and experimentally in primate models of frontal function. It is likely that guanfacine improved prefrontal functions in the SHR. It cannot be concluded, however, that the effects of the drug are mediated solely by norepinephrine.Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is currently defined as a cognitive developmental disorder where all clinical criteria are behavioral [1]. Overactivity, impulsiveness, and inattentiveness are presently regarded as the main clinical symptoms.There have been many attempts to explain the origins of ADHD symptoms. A dual-process model [2-5] suggests that less efficient reinforcement processes and deficient extinction of previously reinforced behavior are fundamental to the problems described as response inhibition [6] and poor executive functions [7].ADHD is highly heritable and the genetic and neurobiological causes are likely to reside in brain catecholaminergic systems (for a review see [4]). Most likely, ADHD symptoms are associated with dysregulation of dopaminergic and noradrenergic modu
Impulsiveness, overactivity, and poorer sustained attention improve by chronic treatment with low doses of l-amphetamine in an animal model of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD)
Terje Sagvolden
Behavioral and Brain Functions , 2011, DOI: 10.1186/1744-9081-7-6
Abstract: The present study tested the behavioral effects of 0.75 and 2.2 mg l-amphetamine base/kg i.p. in male SHRs and their controls, the Wistar Kyoto rat (WKY). ADHD-like behavior was tested with a visual discrimination task measuring overactivity, impulsiveness and inattentiveness.The striking impulsiveness, overactivity, and poorer sustained attention seen during baseline conditions in the SHR were improved by chronic treatment with l-amphetamine. The dose-response curves were, however, different for the different behaviors. Most significantly, the 0.75 mg/kg dose of l-amphetamine improved sustained attention without reducing overactivity and impulsiveness. The 2.2 mg/kg dose improved sustained attention as well as reduced SHR overactivity and impulsiveness.The effects of l-amphetamine to reduce the behavioral symptoms of ADHD in the SHR were maintained over the 14 days of daily dosing with no evidence of tolerance developing.Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is currently defined as a cognitive developmental disorder where all clinical criteria are behavioral [1]. Overactivity, impulsiveness, and inattentiveness are presently regarded as the main clinical symptoms.There have been many attempts to explain the origins of ADHD symptoms. A dual-process theory [2-5] suggests that less efficient reinforcement processes and deficient extinction of previously reinforced behavior may explain behavioral changes often described as response disinhibition [6] or poor executive functioning [7].ADHD is highly heritable and the genetic and neurobiological causes are likely to reside in brain catecholamines (for a review see [4]). Most likely, ADHD symptoms are associated with reduced post-synaptic efficacy of dopaminergic and noradrenergic modulation of neuronal circuits that involve the frontal lobes [8,9]. Imaging of striatal neuronal networks indicates reduced dopamine efficacy in ADHD [10]. Further, noradrenergic systems are involved in attention processes and prime p
Behavioral and Brain Functions. A new journal
Terje Sagvolden
Behavioral and Brain Functions , 2005, DOI: 10.1186/1744-9081-1-1
Abstract: Behavioral and Brain Functions (BBF) is an Open Access, peer-reviewed, online journal considering original research, review, and modeling articles in all aspects of neurobiology or behavior, favoring research that relates to both domains. BBF is published by BioMed Central.The greatest challenge for empirical science is to understand human behavior, how human behavior arises from the myriad functions such as attention, language, memory and emotion, how these functions are reflected in the human brain, and how brain functions and behavior are altered in disease. Behavioral and cognitive neuroscience investigates the psychological, computational, and neuroscientific bases of normal and abnormal behavior. It is a field that receives a lot of attention through the Brain Awareness Week in March every year. The "Decade of the Brain" (1990–2000) was also important for promoting the field. The interdisciplinary nature of the field covers developments in human and animal behavioral science, neuroscience, neuropsychology, cognitive psychology, neurobiology, linguistics, computer science, and philosophy.Behavioral and Brain Functions is the first Open Access journal for basic research covering the entire area of behavioral and cognitive neuroscience – an area where animal studies traditionally play a prominent role. Behavioral and Brain Functions is published online, allowing unlimited space for figures, extensive datasets to allow readers to study the data for themselves, and moving pictures, which are important qualities assisting communication in modern science.Behavioral and Brain Functions' Open Access policy changes the way in which articles are published. First, all articles become freely and universally accessible online, and so an author's work can be read by anyone at no cost. Second, the authors hold copyright for their work and grant anyone the right to reproduce and disseminate the article, provided that it is correctly cited and no errors are introduced [1]. Thir
The Older Futark and Roman Script Literacy
Terje Spurkland
Futhark : International Journal of Runic Studies , 2010,
Abstract:
Runesteiner som multimodale tekster
Terje Spurkland
Futhark : International Journal of Runic Studies , 2012,
Abstract:
Review of Events and Semantic Architecture by Paul Pietroski
Terje Lohndal
Oslo Studies in Language , 2009,
Abstract:
The Serbian Church Slavonic text of the Martyrion of Dorotheos of Alexandria
Terje Helland
Poljarnyj Vestnik , 2006,
Abstract: This article provides an introduction to and edition of the Serbian Church Slavonic text of the Martyrion of Dorotheos of Alexandria.
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