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Search Results: 1 - 10 of 210515 matches for " Tara L. Morgan "
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Circadian Integration of Glutamatergic Signals by Little SAAS in Novel Suprachiasmatic Circuits
Norman Atkins Jr,Jennifer W. Mitchell,Elena V. Romanova,Daniel J. Morgan,Tara P. Cominski,Jennifer L. Ecker,John E. Pintar,Jonathan V. Sweedler,Martha U. Gillette
PLOS ONE , 2012, DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0012612
Abstract: Neuropeptides are critical integrative elements within the central circadian clock in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), where they mediate both cell-to-cell synchronization and phase adjustments that cause light entrainment. Forward peptidomics identified little SAAS, derived from the proSAAS prohormone, among novel SCN peptides, but its role in the SCN is poorly understood.
Projected Evolution of California's San Francisco Bay-Delta-River System in a Century of Climate Change
James E. Cloern, Noah Knowles, Larry R. Brown, Daniel Cayan, Michael D. Dettinger, Tara L. Morgan, David H. Schoellhamer, Mark T. Stacey, Mick van der Wegen, R. Wayne Wagner, Alan D. Jassby
PLOS ONE , 2011, DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0024465
Abstract: Background Accumulating evidence shows that the planet is warming as a response to human emissions of greenhouse gases. Strategies of adaptation to climate change will require quantitative projections of how altered regional patterns of temperature, precipitation and sea level could cascade to provoke local impacts such as modified water supplies, increasing risks of coastal flooding, and growing challenges to sustainability of native species. Methodology/Principal Findings We linked a series of models to investigate responses of California's San Francisco Estuary-Watershed (SFEW) system to two contrasting scenarios of climate change. Model outputs for scenarios of fast and moderate warming are presented as 2010–2099 projections of nine indicators of changing climate, hydrology and habitat quality. Trends of these indicators measure rates of: increasing air and water temperatures, salinity and sea level; decreasing precipitation, runoff, snowmelt contribution to runoff, and suspended sediment concentrations; and increasing frequency of extreme environmental conditions such as water temperatures and sea level beyond the ranges of historical observations. Conclusions/Significance Most of these environmental indicators change substantially over the 21st century, and many would present challenges to natural and managed systems. Adaptations to these changes will require flexible planning to cope with growing risks to humans and the challenges of meeting demands for fresh water and sustaining native biota. Programs of ecosystem rehabilitation and biodiversity conservation in coastal landscapes will be most likely to meet their objectives if they are designed from considerations that include: (1) an integrated perspective that river-estuary systems are influenced by effects of climate change operating on both watersheds and oceans; (2) varying sensitivity among environmental indicators to the uncertainty of future climates; (3) inevitability of biological community changes as responses to cumulative effects of climate change and other drivers of habitat transformations; and (4) anticipation and adaptation to the growing probability of ecosystem regime shifts.
Virtual Reality and Special Needs
Tara L. Jeffs
Themes in Science and Technology Education , 2009,
Abstract: The use of virtual environments for special needs is as diverse as the field of Special Educationitself and the individuals it serves. Individuals with special needs often face challenges withattention, language, spatial abilities, memory, higher reasoning and knowledge acquisition.Research in the use of Virtual Learning Environments (VLE) targets both cognition and behavior(Rizzo, et.al, 2001). Virtual environments encourage interactive learning and provide avariety of opportunities for the learner to have control over the learning process (Pantelidis,1993). Virtual reality technology is an exciting tool that involves a safe and supportive environmentto transfer knowledge between virtual and real worlds. Through such technology,individuals with special needs can look carefully at their own strengths, abilities, and learningpreferences in comparison to the required learning task and expected learning outcome. Thisarticle reviews relevant research that explores the use of virtual reality for individuals withspecial needs.
Gastronomic Tourism: Attitudes, Motivations and Satisfaction of the Visitor in Cantons of Tungurahua, Ecuador  [PDF]
Tannia Elizabeth Huertas López, Yenis Cuétara Hernández, Leonardo Manuel Cuétara Sánchez, Milton Marino Villarreal Pastaz
American Journal of Industrial and Business Management (AJIBM) , 2019, DOI: 10.4236/ajibm.2019.93047
Abstract:
Gastronomic tourism is a new form of cultural tourism that seeks to satisfy the demand of a market segment related to the supply of food products. Regarding this purpose, Ecuador presents a mega diversity of flavors and natural products that reflect natural and cultural offering, particularly in gastronomy which has merged the Ecuadorian ancestral flavors with the techniques of contemporary cuisine. The purpose of this article is to characterize the segment of tourists and excursionists who are motivated to visit the cantons of Ambato, Banos and Mocha located in the province of Tungurahua due to their customs and gastronomic traditions. The methodology used is based on the philosophy of gastronomic marketing, especially, in the characterization of a set of socio-psychological variables related to the motivation and satisfaction of food and drink offerings in the selected cantons, by applying multivariate statistical and descriptive analysis tools. Among the conclusions of the study it is emphasized the need to develop a management strategy for the improvement in the visitor service delivery, the identification of new attractions, health conditions of the premises and service areas, as well as the timely marketing and promotion of the current gastronomic offering.
Managing DSRC and WAVE Standards Operations in a V2V Scenario
Yasser L. Morgan
International Journal of Vehicular Technology , 2010, DOI: 10.1155/2010/797405
Abstract: The Dedicated Short-Range Communications (DSRC) standards suite is based on multiple cooperating standards mainly developed by the IEEE. In particular, we focus this paper on the core design aspects of DSRC which is called Wireless Access in Vehicular Environment (WAVE). WAVE is highlighted in IEEE 1609.1/.2/.3/.4. The DSRC and WAVE standards have been the center of major attention in both research and industrial communities. In 2008, WAVE standard was the third best seller standards in the history of the IEEE. This attention reflects the potential of WAVE to facilitate much of the vehicular safety applications. In this paper we present a fairly detailed tutorial of the WAVE standards. We extend the paper by describing some of the lessons learned from particular design approaches. We direct the reader to the landmark research papers in relevant topics. We alert the reader about major open research issues that might lead to future contribution to the WAVE design. 1. DSRC Introduction and Historic Notes About one million traffic accidents occur annually in the USA. In 2003 alone, these accidents accounted for 230 billion in damaged property, 2,889,000 nonfatal injuries, and 42,643 deaths. Evidently, most of those accidents are preventable by implementing comprehensive wireless communication mechanism to exchange vital safety and emergency information between moving vehicles [1]. Dedicated Short-Range Communications (DSRC) is a suite of standards at the heart of the communication of vehicular safety messages. The fast exchanging of safety messages, combined with knowledge about other moving vehicles that may not be visible to drivers in a timely manner extend the safety concepts beyond the dreams of most of the public [2]. Wireless Access in Vehicular Environment (WAVE) is a term used to describe the suite of IEEE P1609.x standards that are focused on MAC and network layers. WAVE is fairly complex and is built over the IEEE 802.11 standards by amending many tweaks to guarantee fast reliable exchange of safety messages. WAVE is the core part of DSRC; however, either of the two terms is commonly used arbitrarily. In some cases, the term DSRC is used as a more general term compared to WAVE. The history leading to the development of current DSRC goes back almost a decade and a half. In the early 1990s, it became clear that road toll collection can be simplified by means of RFID transponders. Major industrial suppliers of electronic toll collection quickly discovered that further development on 915?MHz might pave the road for much elegant breed of applications
The role of genetics in pre-eclampsia and potential pharmacogenomic interventions
Williams PJ, Morgan L
Pharmacogenomics and Personalized Medicine , 2012, DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/PGPM.S23141
Abstract: ole of genetics in pre-eclampsia and potential pharmacogenomic interventions Review (2746) Total Article Views Authors: Williams PJ, Morgan L Published Date January 2012 Volume 2012:5 Pages 37 - 51 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/PGPM.S23141 Received: 30 November 2011 Accepted: 20 December 2011 Published: 20 January 2012 Paula Juliet Williams, Linda Morgan Human Genetics Research Group, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, UK Abstract: The pregnancy-specific condition pre-eclampsia not only affects the health of mother and baby during pregnancy but also has long-term consequences, increasing the chances of cardiovascular disease in later life. It is accepted that pre-eclampsia has a placental origin, but the pathogenic mechanisms leading to the systemic endothelial dysfunction characteristic of the disorder remain to be determined. In this review we discuss some key factors regarded as important in the development of pre-eclampsia, including immune maladaptation, inadequate placentation, oxidative stress, and thrombosis. Genetic factors influence all of these proposed pathophysiological mechanisms. The inherited nature of pre-eclampsia has been known for many years, and extensive genetic studies have been undertaken in this area. Genetic research offers an attractive strategy for studying the pathogenesis of pre-eclampsia as it avoids the ethical and practical difficulties of conducting basic science research during the preclinical phase of pre-eclampsia when the underlying pathological changes occur. Although pharmacogenomic studies have not yet been conducted in pre-eclampsia, a number of studies investigating treatment for essential hypertension are of relevance to therapies used in pre-eclampsia. The pharmacogenomics of antiplatelet agents, alpha and beta blockers, calcium channel blockers, and magnesium sulfate are discussed in relation to the treatment and prevention of pre-eclampsia. Pharmacogenomics offers the prospect of individualized patient treatment, ensuring swift introduction of optimal treatment whilst minimizing the use of inappropriate or ineffective drugs, thereby reducing the risk of harmful effects to both mother and baby.
The role of genetics in pre-eclampsia and potential pharmacogenomic interventions
Williams PJ,Morgan L
Pharmacogenomics and Personalized Medicine , 2012,
Abstract: Paula Juliet Williams, Linda MorganHuman Genetics Research Group, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, UKAbstract: The pregnancy-specific condition pre-eclampsia not only affects the health of mother and baby during pregnancy but also has long-term consequences, increasing the chances of cardiovascular disease in later life. It is accepted that pre-eclampsia has a placental origin, but the pathogenic mechanisms leading to the systemic endothelial dysfunction characteristic of the disorder remain to be determined. In this review we discuss some key factors regarded as important in the development of pre-eclampsia, including immune maladaptation, inadequate placentation, oxidative stress, and thrombosis. Genetic factors influence all of these proposed pathophysiological mechanisms. The inherited nature of pre-eclampsia has been known for many years, and extensive genetic studies have been undertaken in this area. Genetic research offers an attractive strategy for studying the pathogenesis of pre-eclampsia as it avoids the ethical and practical difficulties of conducting basic science research during the preclinical phase of pre-eclampsia when the underlying pathological changes occur. Although pharmacogenomic studies have not yet been conducted in pre-eclampsia, a number of studies investigating treatment for essential hypertension are of relevance to therapies used in pre-eclampsia. The pharmacogenomics of antiplatelet agents, alpha and beta blockers, calcium channel blockers, and magnesium sulfate are discussed in relation to the treatment and prevention of pre-eclampsia. Pharmacogenomics offers the prospect of individualized patient treatment, ensuring swift introduction of optimal treatment whilst minimizing the use of inappropriate or ineffective drugs, thereby reducing the risk of harmful effects to both mother and baby.Keywords: pre-eclampsia, pharmacogenetics, placenta, trophoblast, genetics
On vertex stabilisers in symmetric quintic graphs
G. L. Morgan
Mathematics , 2012,
Abstract: In this paper we determine all locally finite and symmetric actions of a group on the tree of valency five. As a corollary we complete the classification of the isomorphism types of vertex and edge stabilisers in a group acting symmetrically on a graph of valency five. This builds on work of Weiss and recent work of Zhou and Feng. This depends upon the second result of this paper, the classification of isomorphism types of finite, primitive amalgams of degree (5, 2).
The Relationship of the Sapstreak Fungus, Ceratocystis virescens, to Sugar Maple Dieback and Decay in Northern Michigan  [PDF]
Tara L. Bal, Dana L. Richter, Andrew J. Storer, Martin F. Jurgensen
American Journal of Plant Sciences (AJPS) , 2013, DOI: 10.4236/ajps.2013.42A056
Abstract:

Unusually high levels of dieback have recently been reported in sugar maple, Acer saccharum Marsh., in Upper Michigan, and a network of plots was established to determine the extent and factors associated with the dieback. A possible contributor to this dieback is sapstreak disease caused by Ceratocystis virescens (Davidson) Moreau. Unhealthy trees with considerable crown dieback were evaluated across the western Upper Peninsula, MI to determine the prevalence of the sapstreak fungus using a minimally destructive sampling technique. Approximately 8% of 90 trees sampled were sapstreak positive and approximately 10% of trees were positive at one site that had recently been harvested. While the high levels of maple dieback present in these forests appear not to be directly caused by widespread sapstreak disease, the occurrence of sapstreak may be significantly impacting trees at some locations. However, even when present on a low number of trees, the biointeraction of sapstreak and decay rates from other fungi could be important for future tree mortality and value to the forest industry. Therefore, the effect of two sapstreak fungal isolates on the amount of decay caused by two common maple white rot fungi, Trametes versicolor (L.:Fr.) Pilat. And Irpex lacteus (Fr.:Fr.) Fr. was tested in the laboratory. Sugar maple wood blocks were precolonized by two native isolates of C. virescens followed by inoculation and incubation with decay fungi. Mean percent weight loss of blocks by white rot

Complications from Plaque versus Proton Beam Therapy for Choroidal Melanoma: A Qualitative Systematic Review  [PDF]
Victoria L. Tseng, Anne L. Coleman, Zuo-Feng Zhang, Tara A. McCannel
Journal of Cancer Therapy (JCT) , 2016, DOI: 10.4236/jct.2016.73018
Abstract: Plaque brachytherapy has been a mainstay of treatment for choroidal melanoma to achieve intraocular tumor control. The most common radioisotopes used for treating smaller sized tumors are Iodine-125 in North America and Ruthenium-106 in Europe. Proton beam radiotherapy is available at a few centers and may also be used to achieve local tumor control. Both plaque and proton beam therapy are known to be associated with a range of complications that may affect visual outcome and quality of life. These include radiation retinopathy, optic neuropathy, neovascular glaucoma and local treatment failure, requiring enucleation. While differences in the rates of these complications have not been well established in the literature for patients treated with plaque versus proton beam therapy for choroidal melanoma, certain geographic regions prefer one treatment modality over the other. The purpose of this qualitative systematic review was to compare and contrast reported complications that developed with plaque and proton beam therapy for the treatment of choroidal melanoma in studies published over a ten-year period. Reported rates suggest that patients with proton beam therapy had potentially higher rates of complications, including vision loss, enucleation, and neovascular glaucoma compared to those with plaque therapy. The rates of optic neuropathy, radiation retinopathy, and cataract formation were widely variable for the two treatment modalities and rates of metastasis and metastasis-free survival appeared similar with both treatments. The most common reported predictors of ocular complications following both types of therapy were tumor distance from the optic nerve, tumor thickness, and radiation dose, suggesting that inherent tumor characteristics play a role in visual prognosis.
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