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Search Results: 1 - 10 of 13012 matches for " Tae-Young Choi "
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Ginseng for Health Care: A Systematic Review of Randomized Controlled Trials in Korean Literature
Jiae Choi, Tae-Hun Kim, Tae-Young Choi, Myeong Soo Lee
PLOS ONE , 2013, DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0059978
Abstract: Objective This systematic review was performed to summarise randomised clinical trials (RCTs) assessing the efficacy and safety of ginseng in the Korean literature. Method The study involved systematic searches conducted in eight Korean Medical databases. The methodological quality of all of the included studies was assessed using the Cochrane Risk of Bias tool. We included all RCTs on any type of ginseng compared to placebo, active treatment or no treatment in healthy individuals or patients regardless of conditions. Results In total, 1415 potentially relevant studies were identified, and 30 randomised clinical trials were included. Nine RCTs assessed the effects of ginseng on exercise capacity, cognitive performance, somatic symptoms, quality of life, and sleeping in healthy persons. Six RCTs tested ginseng compared with placebo for erectile dysfunction, while another four studies evaluated the effects of ginseng against no treatment for gastric and colon cancer. Two RCTs compared the effect of red ginseng on diabetes mellitus with no treatment or placebo, and the other nine RCTs assessed the effects of ginseng compared with placebo or no treatment on various conditions. The methodological caveats of the included trials make their contribution to the current clinical evidence of ginseng somewhat limited. However, the 20 newly added trials (66.7% of the 30 trials) may provide useful information for future trials. Ginseng appears to be generally safe, and no serious adverse effects have been reported. Conclusions The clinical effects of ginseng have been tested in a wide range of conditions in Korea. Although the quality of RCTs published in the Korean literature was generally poor, this review is useful for researchers to access studies that were originally published in languages that they would otherwise be unable to read and due to the paucity of evidence on this subject.
Using Guasha to treat musculoskeletal pain: A systematic review of controlled clinical trials
Myeong Soo Lee, Tae-Young Choi, Jong-In Kim, Sun-Mi Choi
Chinese Medicine , 2010, DOI: 10.1186/1749-8546-5-5
Abstract: We searched 11 databases (without language restrictions): MEDLINE, Allied and Complementary Medicine (AMED), EMBASE, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), Korean Studies Information (KSI), DBPIA, Korea Institute of Science and Technology Information (KISTI), KoreaMed, Research Information Service System (RISS), China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI) and the Cochrane Library. The search strategy was Guasha (OR scraping) AND pain. Risk of bias was assessed with the Cochrane criteria (i.e. sequence generation, blinding, incomplete outcome measures and allocation concealment).Five randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and two controlled clinical trials (CCTs) were included in the present study. Two RCTs compared Guasha with acupuncture in terms of effectiveness, while the other trials compared Guasha with no treatment (1 trial), acupuncture (4 trials), herbal injection (1 trial) and massage or electric current therapy (1 trial). While two RCTs suggested favorable effects of Guasha on pain reduction and response rate, the quality of these RCTs was poor. One CCT reported beneficial effects of Guasha on musculoskeletal pain but had low methodological quality.Current evidence is insufficient to show that Guasha is effective in pain management. Further RCTs are warranted and methodological quality should be improved.Guasha was defined as a therapeutic modality that uses several tools to scrape or rub the surface of the body to relieve blood (Xue) stagnation. Guasha is used for pain relief in Chinese medicine. Tools for Guasha including a Chinese soup spoon, an edge-worn coin, a slice of water-buffalo horn, a cow rib, honed jade and a simple metal cap with a smooth round lip with oil or water are used in Guasha to scrape or rub the skin to relieve blood stagnation at the body surface [1]. Guasha is also used to treat common cold, flu, respiratory problems and musculoskeletal (MS) pain [2].There are three possible mechanisms of using Guasha t
Effects of moxibustion for constipation treatment: a systematic review of randomized controlled trials
Myeong Soo Lee, Tae-Young Choi, Ji-Eun Park, Edzard Ernst
Chinese Medicine , 2010, DOI: 10.1186/1749-8546-5-28
Abstract: Chronic constipation is a prevalent health condition with patients typically having bowel movements twice a week or less for at least two consecutive weeks or longer. The Rome II criteria define chronic constipation on the basis of two or more of the following symptoms at least 25% of the time for at least 12 weeks in the preceding year: straining at defection, lumpy/hard stools, sensations of incomplete evacuation and three or fewer bowel movements per week [1]. Currently, there is no optimal therapeutic solution for this condition.Acupuncture and moxibustion are increasingly used for the treatment of gastrointestinal (GI) diseases [2-4]. Moxibustion is a Chinese medicine treatment whereby an acupoint is stimulated by the heat generated from burning Artemisia vulgaris [5]. Direct moxibustion is applied to the skin surface, whereas indirect moxibustion is performed with some insulating materials (e.g. ginger, salt) placed between the moxa cone and the skin [5]. The heat is then used to warm the skin at the acupoint.Chinese medicine has a unique approach to diagnosis of constipation [6]. According to Chinese medicine theory, there are four constipation patterns, namely differentiation constipation (including heat constipation), cold constipation, qi constipation and deficiency constipation. The draining method employing filiform needles is used to treat heat constipation and qi constipation [7]. In general, moxibustion is used to treat cold constipation, and deficiency constipation [8].A possible explanation is that the heat stimulates acupoints thereby increasing qi circulation and relieving qi stagnation [9], leading to increased frequency of bowel movement.Among three available systematic reviews on acupuncture for constipation [10-12], two reviews regarded constipation as part of a range of GI disorders [11,12] and included only one uncontrolled observational study. The third systematic review focused on auriculotherapy [10] and included only non-randomized clini
Complementary and alternative medicine for patients with chronic fatigue syndrome: A systematic review
Terje Alraek, Myeong Lee, Tae-Young Choi, Huijuan Cao, Jianping Liu
BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine , 2011, DOI: 10.1186/1472-6882-11-87
Abstract: Seventeen data sources were searched up to 13th August 2011. All randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of any type of CAM therapy used for treating CFS were included, with the exception of acupuncture and complex herbal medicines; studies were included regardless of blinding. Controlled clinical trials, uncontrolled observational studies, and case studies were excluded.A total of 26 RCTs, which included 3,273 participants, met our inclusion criteria. The CAM therapy from the RCTs included the following: mind-body medicine, distant healing, massage, tuina and tai chi, homeopathy, ginseng, and dietary supplementation. Studies of qigong, massage and tuina were demonstrated to have positive effects, whereas distant healing failed to do so. Compared with placebo, homeopathy also had insufficient evidence of symptom improvement in CFS. Seventeen studies tested supplements for CFS. Most of the supplements failed to show beneficial effects for CFS, with the exception of NADH and magnesium.The results of our systematic review provide limited evidence for the effectiveness of CAM therapy in relieving symptoms of CFS. However, we are not able to draw firm conclusions concerning CAM therapy for CFS due to the limited number of RCTs for each therapy, the small sample size of each study and the high risk of bias in these trials. Further rigorous RCTs that focus on promising CAM therapies are warranted.Throughout the world, patients with chronic diseases tend to be high utilisers of health care resources and/or the health care system. Such patients are also frequent users of Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) services, which are present either within or outside the National Health Service. The reasons for using CAM are diverse; however, hope, engagement in one's own health and positive expectations of treatment efficacy are nearly always present. Patients with chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) are no exception. CFS is a challenging illness for patients, as well as those close
一种基于H.263的视频多描述编码方法*
李世平,郁梅,蒋刚毅,Tae-Young CHOI
计算机应用研究 , 2005,
Abstract: 网络上传输图像与视频数据流所遇到的一个重要问题是信息包在传输过程中可能发生丢失或过度延时, 从而造成解码信号的视觉质量严重下降。多描述编码旨在通过对同一个信息源编码成多个具有一定相关性的比特流, 并在多个不同的信道上传输, 以改善不可靠信道上传输的图像与视频信号质量。提出了一种基于H. 263 的视频信号多描述编码方法, 实验结果显示了所提出方法的有效性。
Sfrp5 Modulates Both Wnt and BMP Signaling and Regulates Gastrointestinal Organogensis in the Zebrafish, Danio rerio
Carsten Stuckenholz, Lili Lu, Prakash C. Thakur, Tae-Young Choi, Donghun Shin, Nathan Bahary
PLOS ONE , 2013, DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0062470
Abstract: Sfrp5 belongs to the family of secreted frizzled related proteins (Sfrp), secreted inhibitors of Wingless-MMTV Integration Site (Wnt) signaling, which play an important role in cancer and development. We selected sfrp5 because of its compelling expression profile in the developing endoderm in zebrafish, Danio rerio. In this study, overexpression of sfrp5 in embryos results in defects in both convergent extension (CE) by inhibition of non-canonical Wnt signaling and defects in dorsoventral patterning by inhibition of Tolloid-mediated proteolysis of the BMP inhibitor Chordin. From 25 hours post fertilization (hpf) to 3 days post fertilization (dpf), both overexpression and knockdown of Sfrp5 decrease the size of the endoderm, significantly reducing liver cell number. At 3 dpf, insulin-positive endodermal cells fail to coalesce into a single pancreatic islet. We show that Sfrp5 inhibits both canonical and non-canonical Wnt signaling during embryonic and endodermal development, resulting in endodermal abnormalities.
Task Scheduling Algorithm to Reduce the Number of Processors using Merge Conditions
Tae-Young Choe
International Journal on Computer Science and Engineering , 2012,
Abstract: Some task scheduling algorithms generate the shortest schedule, when its input DAG satisfies a specified condition. Among those scheduling algorithms, TDS algorithm proposed a DAG condition where allocation of two parent tasks of a join task in the same processor cause longer schedule length than allocation in different processors, and it generates the shortest schedule if any input DAG satisfies the condition. In the paper, we propose a post-processing scheduling algorithm that reduces the number of processors while preserving its schedule length. Especially, we propose conditions where two processescan be merged without increasing schedule length. Experimental results show that the number of processor is reduced to 92.3% ~ 98.0% if schedule length is reserved and required computing power isreduced to 84.3% ~ 91.2% if schedule length can be increased.
Moxibustion for ulcerative colitis: a systematic review and meta-analysis
Dong-Hyo Lee, Jong-In Kim, Myeong Soo Lee, Tae-Young Choi, Sun-Mi Choi, Edzard Ernst
BMC Gastroenterology , 2010, DOI: 10.1186/1471-230x-10-36
Abstract: We searched the literature using 18 databases from their inception to February 10, 2010, without language restrictions. We included randomized clinical trials (RCTs), in which human patients with UC were treated with moxibustion. Studies were included if they were placebo-controlled or controlled against a drug therapy or no treatment group. The methodological quality of all RCTs was assessed using the Cochrane risk of bias.In total, five RCTs were included. All were of low methodological quality. They compared the effects of moxibustion with conventional drug therapy. Three tested moxibustion against sulfasalazine and two against sulfasalazine plus other drugs. A meta-analysis of five RCTs showed favorable effects of moxibustion on the response rate compared to conventional drug therapy (n = 407; risk ratio = 1.24, 95% CI = 1.11 to 1.38; P < 0.0001; heterogeneity: I2 = 16%).Current evidence is insufficient to show that moxibustion is an effective treatment of UC. Most of included trials had high risk of bias. More rigorous studies seem warranted.Ulcerative colitis (UC) is a common, chronic idiopathic inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) [1]. Patients typically present with bloody diarrhea, passage of pus, mucus, or both, and abdominal cramping during bowel movements [2]. UC often requires lifelong medication, but poor adherence to medication has been an important barrier to successful management. Relapse rates are high, and the risk of colorectal cancer has increased [3,4].Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) is increasingly used for treatment of IBD [5], and acupuncture and moxibustion are particularly popular options. Moxibustion is a traditional Oriental medicine that uses the heat generated by burning herbal preparations containing Artemisia vulgaris to stimulate acupuncture points. Direct moxibustion is applied directly to the skin surface at an area around an acupuncture point, whereas indirect moxibustion is performed with some insulating materials (e.g.
Acupuncture for the treatment of tinnitus: a systematic review of randomized clinical trials
Jong-In Kim, Jun-Yong Choi, Dong-Hyo Lee, Tae-Young Choi, Myeong Soo Lee, Edzard Ernst
BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine , 2012, DOI: 10.1186/1472-6882-12-97
Abstract: Fourteen databases were searched from the dates of their creation to July 4th, 2012. Randomized clinical trials (RCTs) were included if acupuncture was used as the sole treatment. The Cochrane risk of bias tool was used to assess the risk of bias.A total of 9 RCTs met all the inclusion criteria. Their methodological quality was mostly poor. Five RCTs compared the effectiveness of acupuncture or electroacupuncture with sham acupuncture for treating tinnitus. The results failed to show statistically significant improvements. Two RCTs compared a short one-time scalp acupuncture treatment with the use of penetrating sham acupuncture at non-acupoints in achieving subjective symptom relief on a visual analog scale; these RCTs demonstrated significant positive effects with scalp acupuncture. Two RCTs compared acupuncture with conventional drug treatments. One of these RCTs demonstrated that acupuncture had statistically significant effects on the response rate in patients with nervous tinnitus, but the other RCT did not demonstrate significant effects in patients with senile tinnitus.The number, size and quality of the RCTs on the effectiveness of acupuncture for the treatment of tinnitus are not sufficient for drawing definitive conclusions. Further rigorous RCTs that overcome the many limitations of the current evidence are warranted.
Moxibustion for cancer care: a systematic review and meta-analysis
Myeong Soo Lee, Tae-Young Choi, Ji-Eun Park, Song-Shil Lee, Edzard Ernst
BMC Cancer , 2010, DOI: 10.1186/1471-2407-10-130
Abstract: We searched the literature using 11 databases from their inceptions to February 2010, without language restrictions. We included randomised clinical trials (RCTs) in which moxibustion was employed as an adjuvant treatment for conventional medicine in patients with any type of cancer. The selection of studies, data extraction, and validations were performed independently by two reviewers.Five RCTs compared the effects of moxibustion with conventional therapy. Four RCTs failed to show favourable effects of moxibustion for response rate compared with chemotherapy (n = 229, RR, 1.04, 95% CI 0.94 to 1.15, P = 0.43). Two RCTs assessed the occurrence of side effects of chemotherapy and showed favourable effects of moxibustion. A meta-analysis showed significant less frequency of nausea and vomiting from chemotherapy for moxibustion group (n = 80, RR, 0.38, 95% CIs 0.22 to 0.65, P = 0.0005, heterogeneity: χ2 = 0.18, P = 0.67, I2 = 0%).The evidence is limited to suggest moxibustion is an effective supportive cancer care in nausea and vomiting. However, all studies have a high risk of bias so effectively there is not enough evidence to draw any conclusion. Further research is required to investigate whether there are specific benefits of moxibustion for supportive cancer care.Most cancer patients experience multiple symptoms related to either the cancer itself or late treatment effects [1]. The frequently experienced and severe adverse events associated with such treatments lead patients to seek supportive complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) [2]. Most patients use CAM as an adjunct to conventional treatments [3-5]. Acupuncture type interventions are one of the most popular forms of CAM [6]. It is now a widely accepted intervention for the treatment of a variety of conditions [7]. Several reviews claim that acupuncture offers therapeutic benefits for cancer patients [8-10]. Moxibustion is a traditional Chinese method that uses the heat generated by burning herbal prep
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