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Search Results: 1 - 10 of 117954 matches for " T. Santhi "
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Removal of Malachite Green Dye from Aqueous Solutions onto Microwave Assisted Zinc Chloride Chemical Activated Epicarp of Ricinus communis  [PDF]
M. Makeswari, T. Santhi
Journal of Water Resource and Protection (JWARP) , 2013, DOI: 10.4236/jwarp.2013.52023
Abstract:

Competitive adsorption of malachite green (MG) in single and binary system on microwave activated epicarp of Ricinus communis (MRC) and microwave assisted zinc chloride activated epicarp of Ricinus communis (ZRC) were analyzed. The preparation of ZRC from Ricinus communis was investigated in this paper. Orthogonal array experimental design method was used to optimize the preparation of ZRC. Optimized parameters were radiation power of 100 W, radiation time of 4 min, concentration of zinc chloride of 30% by volume and impregnation time of 16 h, respectively. The MRC and ZRC were characterized by pHzpc, SEM-EDAX and FTIR analysis. The effect of the presence of one dye solution on the adsorption of the other dye solution was investigated in terms of equilibrium isotherm and adsorption yield. Experimental results indicated that the uptake capacities of one dye were reduced by the presence of the other dye. The adsorption equilibrium data fits the Langmuir model well and follows pseudo second-order kinetics for the bio-sorption process. Among MRC and ZRC, ZRC shows most adsorption ability than MRC in single and binary system.

Optimization of Preparation of Activated Carbon from Ricinus communis Leaves by Microwave-Assisted Zinc Chloride Chemical Activation: Competitive Adsorption of Ni2+ Ions from Aqueous Solution
M. Makeswari,T. Santhi
Journal of Chemistry , 2013, DOI: 10.1155/2013/314790
Abstract:
Uptake of Cationic Dyes from Aqueous Solution by Biosorption Using Granulized Annona squmosa Seed
T. Santhi,S. Manonmani
Journal of Chemistry , 2009, DOI: 10.1155/2009/472703
Abstract:
Removal of Methylene blue from aqueous solution by bioadsorption onto Ricinus communis epicarp Activated Carbon
T Santhi,S Manonmani
Chemical Engineering Research Bulletin , 2009,
Abstract: Carbon prepared from the epicarp of Ricinus communis was used to remove a textile dye (methylene blue (MB)) from an aqueous solution by adsorption technique under varying conditions of agitation time, dye concentration, adsorbent dose and pH. Adsorption depended on solution pH, dye concentration, carbon concentration and contact time. Adsorption followed both Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm models. The adsorption capacity was found to be 62.5mg/g at a neutral pH of 7 for the particle size of 125-250 μm at room temperature (32±2°C). The kinetics of adsorption of MB obeys Pseudo-first order. The results in this study indicated that activated carbon from Ricinus communis was an attractive candidate for removing cationic dyes from the dye wastewater.
Removal of malachite green from aqueous solution by activated carbon prepared from the Annona squmosa seed by adsorption
T. Santhi,S. Manonmani,T. Smith
Orbital : the Electronic Journal of Chemistry , 2010,
Abstract: The use of low -cost, locally available, highly efficient and eco-friendly adsorbents has been investigated as an ideal alternative to the current expensive methods of removing dyes from wastewater. This study investigates the potential use of activated carbon prepared from the Annona squmosa seed for the removal of malachite green (MG) dye from simulated wastewater. The effects of different system variables, adsorbent dosage, initial dye concentration, pH and contact time were investigated and optimal experimental conditions were ascertained. The results showed that as the amount of the adsorbent is increased, the percentage of dye removal increase accordingly. Optimum pH value for dye adsorption was 7.0. Maximum dye was sequestered within 50 min from the start of every experiment. The adsorption of malachite green followed the pseudo-second –order rate equation and fits the Langmuir, Freundlich, Dubinin-Radushekevich (D-R) and Tempkin equations well. The maximum removal of MG was obtained at pH 7 as 86.11% for adsorbent dose of 0.2 g/ 50 mL and 25 mg L -1 initial dye concentration at room temperature. Furthermore, adsorption kinetics of MG was studied and the rate of adsorption was found to conform to pseudo-second –order kinetics with a good correlation (R2 > 0.99) with intraparticle diffusion as one of the rate determining steps. Activated carbon developed from the Annona squmosa seed can be an attractive option for dye removal from diluted industrial effluents since test reaction made on simulated dyeing wastewater showed better removal percentage of MG.
Kinetics And Isotherm Studies On Cationic Dyes Adsorption Onto Annona Squmosa Seed Activated Carbon
T. Santhi,S. Manonmani,T.Smitha
International Journal of Engineering Science and Technology , 2010,
Abstract: The use of low - cost, locally available and eco-friendly adsorbents has been investigated as an ideal alternative to the current expensive methods of removing dyes from wastewater. This study investigates the potential use of activated carbon prepared from the Annona squmosa seed for the removal of methylene blue (MB) , methyl red (MR) and malachite green (MG) dyes from simulated wastewater. Adsorption of MB, MR and MG dyes on the Annona squmosa seed showed highest values at around pH 7.0, and followed second –order kinetic with intraparticle diffusion as one of the rate determining steps. The adsorption-equilibrium was represented with Langmuir, Freundlich, Dubinin-Radushekevich and Tempkin isotherms. Activated carbon developed from the Annona squmosa seed can be an attractive option for dyes removal from diluted industrial effluents.
Removal of methyl red from aqueous solution by activated carbon prepared from the Annona squmosa seed by adsorption
T Santhi,S. Manonmani,T. Smitha
Chemical Engineering Research Bulletin , 2010, DOI: 10.3329/cerb.v14i1.3767
Abstract: The use of low-cost, locally available, highly efficiencient and eco-friendly adsorbents has been investigated as an ideal alternative to the current expensive methods of removing dyes from wastewater. This study investigates the potential use of activated carbon prepared from the Annona squmosaseed for the removal of methyl red (MR) dye from simulated wastewater. The effects of different system variables, adsorbent dosage, initial dye concentration, pH and contact time were investigated and optimal experimental conditions were ascertained. The results showed that as the amount of the adsorbent increased, the percentage of dye removal increased accordingly. Optimum pH value for dye adsorption was 7.0. Maximum dye was sequestered within 50 min of the start of every experiment. The adsorption of methylene blue followed the pseudo-second –order rate equation and fits the Langmuir, Freundlich, Dubinin-Radushekevich (D-R) and Tempkin equations well. The maximum removal of MR was obtained at pH 7 as 82.81% for adsorbent dose of 0.2 g/ 50 mL and 25 mg L -1 initial dye concentration at room temperature. Furthermore, adsorption kinetics of MR was studied and the rate of adsorption was found to conform to pseudo-second –order kinetics with a good correlation (R2 > 0.99) with intraparticle diffusion as one of the rate determining steps. Activated carbon developed from the Annona squmosa seed can be an attractive option for dye removal from diluted industrial effluents since test reaction made on simulated dyeing wastewater showed better removal percentage of MR. Keywords: Annona squmosa, Adsorption, Wastewater, Methyl red, Kinetics, Activated carbon DOI = 10.3329/cerb.v14i1.3767 Chemical Engineering Research Bulletin 14 (2010) 11-18
A Study on Traffic Aware Routing Protocol for Wireless Sensor Networks
Gopi.T,Santhi.B
International Journal of Engineering and Technology , 2013,
Abstract: Wireless sensor network are event-driven network systems consist of collection of sensor nodes that are deployed to monitor physical and environmental conditions. In Wireless sensor network, whenever an event is detected, then the data related to the event need to be sent to the sink node (data collection node). While forwarding the data from the source node to sink node there may be chance for congestion due to heavy data traffic. Due to congestion, it leads to data loss, it may be important data also. Objective of this paper is to review various existing methods to detect and control the congestion. Different parameters that are used to measure the congestion also reviewed. Finally a comparison of various parameter measures was presented.
Uptake of Cationic Dyes from Aqueous Solution by Biosorption onto Granular Muntingia calabura
T. Santhi,S. Manonmani,S. Ravi
Journal of Chemistry , 2009, DOI: 10.1155/2009/927406
Abstract:
UPTAKE OF CATIONIC DYES FROM AQUEOUS SOLUTION BY BIOADSORPTION ONTO GRANULAR CUCUMIS SATIVA
T. SANTHI,S. MANONMANI,T. SMITHA,D. SUGIRTHA
Journal of Applied Sciences in Environmental Sanitation , 2009,
Abstract: A new, low cost, locally available biomaterial was tested for its ability to remove cationic dyes from aqueous solution. A granule prepared from a fruit peel of Cucumis sativa had been utilized as a adsorbent for uptake of three cationic dyes, methylene blue (MB), methyl red (MR) and malachite green (MG). The effects of various experimental parameters (e.g., contact time, dye concentration, adsorbent dose, particle size and pH) were investigated and optimal experimental conditions were ascertained. Above the value of initial pH 6, three dyes studied could be removed effectively. The sorption isotherms of MR followed the Langmuir and Freundlich models, but the sorption isotherms of MB and MG only fitted the Freundlich model of adsorption. The bioadsorption processes followed the Pseudo –first order rate kinetics. The results in this study indicated that fruit peel of Cucumis sativa was an attractive candidate for removing cationic dyes from the dye wastewater.
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