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Search Results: 1 - 4 of 4 matches for " Sudaduang Gherunpong "
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The prevalence and severity of oral impacts on daily performances in Thai primary school children
Sudaduang Gherunpong, Georgios Tsakos, Aubrey Sheiham
Health and Quality of Life Outcomes , 2004, DOI: 10.1186/1477-7525-2-57
Abstract: Cross-sectional study of all 1126 children aged 11–12 years in a municipal area of Suphanburi province, Thailand. An OHRQoL measure, Child-Oral Impacts on Daily Performances index (Child-OIDP) was used to assess oral impacts. Children were also clinically examined and completed a self-administered questionnaire about demographic information and oral behaviours.89.8% of children had one or more oral impacts. The median impact score was 7.6 and mean score was 8.8. Nearly half (47.0%) of the children with impacts had impacts at very little or little levels of intensity. Most (84.8%) of those with impacts had 1–4 daily performances affected (out of 8 performances). Eating was the most common performance affected (72.9%). The severity of impacts was high for eating and smiling and low for study and social contact performances. The main clinical causes of impacts were sensitive tooth (27.9%), oral ulcers (25.8%), toothache (25.1%) and an exfoliating primary tooth (23.4%).The study reveals that oral health impacts on quality of life in Thai primary school children. Oral impacts were prevalent, but not severe. The impacts mainly related to difficulty eating and smiling. Toothache, oral ulcers and natural processes contributed largely to the incidence of oral impacts.Contemporary concepts of health suggest that dental health should be defined in physical, psychological and social well-being terms in relation to dental status [1,2]. That is why Cohen and Jago considered that the greatest contribution of dentistry is to the improvement of quality of life because most oral diseases and their consequences interfere with, or have impacts on, daily life performances [3]. Therefore, disruptions in normal physical, psychological and social functioning are important considerations in assessing oral health. Despite these suggestions, traditional methods of measuring oral health use mainly clinical dental indices and focus on the absence or presence of oral diseases. They do not inform
A sociodental approach to assessing children's oral health needs: integrating an oral health-related quality of life (OHRQoL) measure into oral health service planning
Gherunpong,Sudaduang; Sheiham,Aubrey; Tsakos,Georgios;
Bulletin of the World Health Organization , 2006, DOI: 10.1590/S0042-96862006000100012
Abstract: objective: we adopted a sociodental approach to assess the real dental needs of thai primary school children, and integrated an oral health-related quality of life measure (ohrqol) into oral health service planning. we then compared the results of this sociodental assessment with standard estimates of a child's oral health needs. methods: we developed a new model of sociodental needs assessment and used it to assess the level of impact that various oral health conditions have on the everyday lives of school children. we then carried out a cross-sectional study of all grade-6 children (11-12 years old) in suphan-buri province, thailand. we examined the sample (n = 1034) to assess the children's oral health and then we interviewed each child individually to assess what impact any dental conditions he or she may have on their quality of life. this assessment was done using an ohrqol indicator, the child oral impacts on daily performances index (child-oidp). we integrated the results obtained using this indicator with those estimates obtained using more traditional, standard clinical methods, in order to generate a clearer picture of exactly which non-progressive dental conditions really needed treatment. these results take into account the impact those conditions have on the overall well-being of children and their ability to function normally and unimpeded. we were then able to prioritize their dental needs according to the severity of disruption caused in their daily lives. findings: using standard or "normative" estimates of dental health care needs, the children's need was 98.8%. this level of need decreased signifi cantly to 39.5% when adopting the sociodental approach (p <0.001). overall, per 100 children with a standard or normative need for dental treatment, only 40 had a sociodental need for treatment when taking into account the impact their condition has on their everyday lives. children thus identifi ed as requiring treatment were further categorized accord
A sociodental approach to assessing children's oral health needs: integrating an oral health-related quality of life (OHRQoL) measure into oral health service planning
Gherunpong Sudaduang,Sheiham Aubrey,Tsakos Georgios
Bulletin of the World Health Organization , 2006,
Abstract: OBJECTIVE: We adopted a sociodental approach to assess the real dental needs of Thai primary school children, and integrated an oral health-related quality of life measure (OHRQoL) into oral health service planning. We then compared the results of this sociodental assessment with standard estimates of a child's oral health needs. METHODS: We developed a new model of sociodental needs assessment and used it to assess the level of impact that various oral health conditions have on the everyday lives of school children. We then carried out a cross-sectional study of all grade-6 children (11-12 years old) in Suphan-buri Province, Thailand. We examined the sample (n = 1034) to assess the children's oral health and then we interviewed each child individually to assess what impact any dental conditions he or she may have on their quality of life. This assessment was done using an OHRQoL indicator, the Child Oral Impacts on Daily Performances index (child-OIDP). We integrated the results obtained using this indicator with those estimates obtained using more traditional, standard clinical methods, in order to generate a clearer picture of exactly which non-progressive dental conditions really needed treatment. These results take into account the impact those conditions have on the overall well-being of children and their ability to function normally and unimpeded. We were then able to prioritize their dental needs according to the severity of disruption caused in their daily lives. FINDINGS: Using standard or "normative" estimates of dental health care needs, the children's need was 98.8%. This level of need decreased signifi cantly to 39.5% when adopting the sociodental approach (P <0.001). Overall, per 100 children with a standard or normative need for dental treatment, only 40 had a sociodental need for treatment when taking into account the impact their condition has on their everyday lives. Children thus identifi ed as requiring treatment were further categorized according to the severity of impact their condition had: 7.2% had severe, 10.3% moderate and 22.0% had minor impacts on OHRQoL. CONCLUSIONS: There was a marked difference between the standard normative and the sociodental needs assessment approach, with the latter approach showing a 60% lower assessment of dental health care needs in Thai 11-12-year-old children. Different levels of "impacts" on daily life can be used to prioritize children with needs.
Validation of an English version of the Child-OIDP index, an oral health-related quality of life measure for children
Huda Yusuf, Sudaduang Gherunpong, Aubrey Sheiham, Georgios Tsakos
Health and Quality of Life Outcomes , 2006, DOI: 10.1186/1477-7525-4-38
Abstract: Children aged 10–11 years in the final year of primary school (year 6) were selected from seven schools where annual screenings are carried out. A total of 228 children participated (99% response rate). A clinical examination was conducted followed by a questionnaire designed to measure oral health-related quality of life in children, namely the Child-OIDP. The psychometric properties of the Child-OIDP were evaluated in terms of face, content and concurrent validity in addition to internal and test-retest reliability.The Child-OIDP revealed excellent validity and good reliability. Weighted Kappa was 0.82. Cronbach's alpha coefficient was 0.58. The index showed significant associations with perceived oral treatment needs and perceived satisfaction with mouth and oral health status (p < 0.001).This study has demonstrated that the Child-OIDP is a valid and reliable index to be used among 10–11 year old schoolchildren in the UK.The concept of need is central to planning, provision and evaluation of health care services. Traditionally, need has been estimated by using professionally based measures, known as normative need. Although normative need is important, it mainly reflects the clinical aspects of illness. However, subjective measures of health are important too, because they provide insights into how people feel and how satisfied they are with their quality of life [1]. Health-related quality of life instruments should therefore be used in conjunction with clinical measures.A child's oral health can impact on eating, smiling, speaking and socialising. Oral conditions, such as dental caries may result in pain, which in turn may lead to consequences on a child's daily life such as taking time off from school or difficulty eating. Facial appearance and its relation to body image, self-esteem and emotional well-being also play important roles in social interaction. Measuring oral impacts in children is particularly relevant, as it will aid researchers and policymakers
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