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Search Results: 1 - 10 of 408 matches for " Stricker RB "
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Filament formation associated with spirochetal infection: a comparative approach to Morgellons disease
Middelveen MJ, Stricker RB
Clinical, Cosmetic and Investigational Dermatology , 2011, DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/CCID.S26183
Abstract: ment formation associated with spirochetal infection: a comparative approach to Morgellons disease Perspectives (16534) Total Article Views Authors: Middelveen MJ, Stricker RB Published Date November 2011 Volume 2011:4 Pages 167 - 177 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/CCID.S26183 Marianne J Middelveen, Raphael B Stricker International Lyme and Associated Diseases Society, Bethesda, MD, USA Abstract: Bovine digital dermatitis is an emerging infectious disease that causes lameness, decreased milk production, and weight loss in livestock. Proliferative stages of bovine digital dermatitis demonstrate keratin filament formation in skin above the hooves in affected animals. The multifactorial etiology of digital dermatitis is not well understood, but spirochetes and other coinfecting microorganisms have been implicated in the pathogenesis of this veterinary illness. Morgellons disease is an emerging human dermopathy characterized by the presence of filamentous fibers of undetermined composition, both in lesions and subdermally. While the etiology of Morgellons disease is unknown, there is serological and clinical evidence linking this phenomenon to Lyme borreliosis and coinfecting tick-borne agents. Although the microscopy of Morgellons filaments has been described in the medical literature, the structure and pathogenesis of these fibers is poorly understood. In contrast, most microscopy of digital dermatitis has focused on associated pathogens and histology rather than the morphology of late-stage filamentous fibers. Clinical, laboratory, and microscopic characteristics of these two diseases are compared.
Filament formation associated with spirochetal infection: a comparative approach to Morgellons disease
Middelveen MJ,Stricker RB
Clinical, Cosmetic and Investigational Dermatology , 2011,
Abstract: Marianne J Middelveen, Raphael B StrickerInternational Lyme and Associated Diseases Society, Bethesda, MD, USAAbstract: Bovine digital dermatitis is an emerging infectious disease that causes lameness, decreased milk production, and weight loss in livestock. Proliferative stages of bovine digital dermatitis demonstrate keratin filament formation in skin above the hooves in affected animals. The multifactorial etiology of digital dermatitis is not well understood, but spirochetes and other coinfecting microorganisms have been implicated in the pathogenesis of this veterinary illness. Morgellons disease is an emerging human dermopathy characterized by the presence of filamentous fibers of undetermined composition, both in lesions and subdermally. While the etiology of Morgellons disease is unknown, there is serological and clinical evidence linking this phenomenon to Lyme borreliosis and coinfecting tick-borne agents. Although the microscopy of Morgellons filaments has been described in the medical literature, the structure and pathogenesis of these fibers is poorly understood. In contrast, most microscopy of digital dermatitis has focused on associated pathogens and histology rather than the morphology of late-stage filamentous fibers. Clinical, laboratory, and microscopic characteristics of these two diseases are compared.Keywords: Digital dermatitis, Morgellons disease, Lyme disease, Borrelia burgdorferi, spirochetes
Characterization and evolution of dermal filaments from patients with Morgellons disease
Middelveen MJ, Mayne PJ, Kahn DG, Stricker RB
Clinical, Cosmetic and Investigational Dermatology , 2013, DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/CCID.S39017
Abstract: racterization and evolution of dermal filaments from patients with Morgellons disease Original Research (6113) Total Article Views Authors: Middelveen MJ, Mayne PJ, Kahn DG, Stricker RB Video abstract presented by Raphael B Stricker Views: 1031 Published Date January 2013 Volume 2013:6 Pages 1 - 21 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/CCID.S39017 Received: 10 October 2012 Accepted: 28 November 2012 Published: 08 January 2013 Marianne J Middelveen,1 Peter J Mayne,1 Douglas G Kahn,2 Raphael B Stricker1 1International Lyme and Associated Diseases Society, Bethesda, MD, USA; 2Department of Pathology, Olive View–UCLA Medical Center, Sylmar, CA, USA Abstract: Morgellons disease is an emerging skin disease characterized by formation of dermal filaments associated with multisystemic symptoms and tick-borne illness. Some clinicians hypothesize that these often colorful dermal filaments are textile fibers, either self-implanted by patients or accidentally adhering to lesions, and conclude that patients with this disease have delusions of infestation. We present histological observations and electron microscopic imaging from representative Morgellons disease samples revealing that dermal filaments in these cases are keratin and collagen in composition and result from proliferation and activation of keratinocytes and fibroblasts in the epidermis. Spirochetes were detected in the dermatological specimens from our study patients, providing evidence that Morgellons disease is associated with an infectious process.
Benefit of intravenous antibiotic therapy in patients referred for treatment of neurologic Lyme disease
Stricker RB,DeLong AK,Green CL,Savely VR
International Journal of General Medicine , 2011,
Abstract: Raphael B Stricker1,3, Allison K DeLong2, Christine L Green1,3, Virginia R Savely1,3, Stanley N Chamallas1,4, Lorraine Johnson1,31International Lyme and Associated Diseases Society, Bethesda, MD, USA; 2Center for Statistical Sciences, Brown University, Providence, RI, USA; 3California Lyme Disease Association, Marysville, CA, USA; 4QMedRx Inc, Maitland, FL, USABackground: We have shown previously that extended intravenous antibiotic therapy is associated with low morbidity and no mortality in patients referred for treatment of neurologic Lyme disease. In this study, we evaluated the benefit of extended intravenous antibiotic therapy in patients with symptoms of neurologic Lyme disease.Methods: Patients with significant neurologic symptoms and positive testing for Borrelia burgdorferi were treated with intravenous antibiotics, and biweekly evaluation of symptom severity was performed using a six-level ordinal scale. Four symptoms were selected a priori as primary outcome measures in the study, ie, fatigue, cognition, myalgias, and arthralgias. Patients were placed into five groups according to time on treatment (1–4, 5–8, 9–12, 13–24, and 25–52 weeks), and changes in the primary symptoms as a function of time on treatment were analyzed using a mixed-effects proportional odds model.Results: Among 158 patients with more than one follow-up visit who were monitored for up to 1 year, there were on average 6.7 visits per person (median 5, range 2–24). The last follow-up day was on average 96 days after enrollment (median 69, range 7–354 days), corresponding to the length of antibiotic therapy. Each primary symptom was significantly improved at one or more time points during the study. For cognition, fatigue, and myalgias, the greatest improvement occurred in patients on the longest courses of treatment (25–52 weeks) with odds ratios (OR) for improvement of 1.97 (P = 0.02), 2.22 (P < 0.01), and 2.08 (P = 0.01), respectively. In contrast, arthralgias were only significantly improved during the initial 1–4 weeks of therapy (OR: 1.57, P = 0.04), and the beneficial effect of longer treatment did not reach statistical significance for this symptom.Conclusion: Prolonged intravenous antibiotic therapy is associated with improved cognition, fatigue, and myalgias in patients referred for treatment of neurologic Lyme disease. Treatment for 25–52 weeks may be necessary to obtain symptomatic improvement in these patients.Keywords: Lyme disease, Borrelia burgdorferi, intravenous antibiotics, neurologic symptoms
Characterization and evolution of dermal filaments from patients with Morgellons disease
Middelveen MJ,Mayne PJ,Kahn DG,Stricker RB
Clinical, Cosmetic and Investigational Dermatology , 2013,
Abstract: Marianne J Middelveen,1 Peter J Mayne,1 Douglas G Kahn,2 Raphael B Stricker11International Lyme and Associated Diseases Society, Bethesda, MD, USA; 2Department of Pathology, Olive View–UCLA Medical Center, Sylmar, CA, USAAbstract: Morgellons disease is an emerging skin disease characterized by formation of dermal filaments associated with multisystemic symptoms and tick-borne illness. Some clinicians hypothesize that these often colorful dermal filaments are textile fibers, either self-implanted by patients or accidentally adhering to lesions, and conclude that patients with this disease have delusions of infestation. We present histological observations and electron microscopic imaging from representative Morgellons disease samples revealing that dermal filaments in these cases are keratin and collagen in composition and result from proliferation and activation of keratinocytes and fibroblasts in the epidermis. Spirochetes were detected in the dermatological specimens from our study patients, providing evidence that Morgellons disease is associated with an infectious process.Keywords: Morgellons disease, digital dermatitis, Lyme disease, Borrelia burgdorferi, spirochetes, keratin, keratinocytes, collagen, fibroblasts
Benefit of intravenous antibiotic therapy in patients referred for treatment of neurologic Lyme disease
Stricker RB, DeLong AK, Green CL, Savely VR, Chamallas SN, Johnson L
International Journal of General Medicine , 2011, DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/IJGM.S23829
Abstract: enefit of intravenous antibiotic therapy in patients referred for treatment of neurologic Lyme disease Original Research (12855) Total Article Views Authors: Stricker RB, DeLong AK, Green CL, Savely VR, Chamallas SN, Johnson L Video abstract presented by Raphael Stricker Views: 650 Published Date September 2011 Volume 2011:4 Pages 639 - 646 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/IJGM.S23829 Raphael B Stricker1,3, Allison K DeLong2, Christine L Green1,3, Virginia R Savely1,3, Stanley N Chamallas1,4, Lorraine Johnson1,3 1International Lyme and Associated Diseases Society, Bethesda, MD, USA; 2Center for Statistical Sciences, Brown University, Providence, RI, USA; 3California Lyme Disease Association, Marysville, CA, USA; 4QMedRx Inc, Maitland, FL, USA Background: We have shown previously that extended intravenous antibiotic therapy is associated with low morbidity and no mortality in patients referred for treatment of neurologic Lyme disease. In this study, we evaluated the benefit of extended intravenous antibiotic therapy in patients with symptoms of neurologic Lyme disease. Methods: Patients with significant neurologic symptoms and positive testing for Borrelia burgdorferi were treated with intravenous antibiotics, and biweekly evaluation of symptom severity was performed using a six-level ordinal scale. Four symptoms were selected a priori as primary outcome measures in the study, ie, fatigue, cognition, myalgias, and arthralgias. Patients were placed into five groups according to time on treatment (1–4, 5–8, 9–12, 13–24, and 25–52 weeks), and changes in the primary symptoms as a function of time on treatment were analyzed using a mixed-effects proportional odds model. Results: Among 158 patients with more than one follow-up visit who were monitored for up to 1 year, there were on average 6.7 visits per person (median 5, range 2–24). The last follow-up day was on average 96 days after enrollment (median 69, range 7–354 days), corresponding to the length of antibiotic therapy. Each primary symptom was significantly improved at one or more time points during the study. For cognition, fatigue, and myalgias, the greatest improvement occurred in patients on the longest courses of treatment (25–52 weeks) with odds ratios (OR) for improvement of 1.97 (P = 0.02), 2.22 (P < 0.01), and 2.08 (P = 0.01), respectively. In contrast, arthralgias were only significantly improved during the initial 1–4 weeks of therapy (OR: 1.57, P = 0.04), and the beneficial effect of longer treatment did not reach statistical significance for this symptom. Conclusion: Prolonged intravenous antibiotic therapy is associated with improved cognition, fatigue, and myalgias in patients referred for treatment of neurologic Lyme disease. Treatment for 25–52 weeks may be necessary to obtain symptomatic improvement in these patients.
Evaluation of in-vitro antibiotic susceptibility of different morphological forms of Borrelia burgdorferi
Sapi E, Kaur N, Anyanwu S, Luecke DF, Datar A, Patel S, Rossi M, Stricker RB
Infection and Drug Resistance , 2011, DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/IDR.S19201
Abstract: luation of in-vitro antibiotic susceptibility of different morphological forms of Borrelia burgdorferi Original Research (23320) Total Article Views Authors: Sapi E, Kaur N, Anyanwu S, Luecke DF, Datar A, Patel S, Rossi M, Stricker RB Published Date May 2011 Volume 2011:4 Pages 97 - 113 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/IDR.S19201 Eva Sapi1, Navroop Kaur1, Samuel Anyanwu1, David F Luecke1, Akshita Datar1, Seema Patel1, Michael Rossi1, Raphael B Stricker2 1Lyme Disease Research Group, Department of Biology and Environmental Sciences, University of New Haven, New Haven, CT, USA; 2International Lyme and Associated Diseases Society, Bethesda, MD, USA Background: Lyme disease is a tick-borne illness caused by the spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi. Although antibiotic therapy is usually effective early in the disease, relapse may occur when administration of antibiotics is discontinued. Studies have suggested that resistance and recurrence of Lyme disease might be due to formation of different morphological forms of B. burgdorferi, namely round bodies (cysts) and biofilm-like colonies. Better understanding of the effect of antibiotics on all morphological forms of B. burgdorferi is therefore crucial to provide effective therapy for Lyme disease. Methods: Three morphological forms of B. burgdorferi (spirochetes, round bodies, and biofilm-like colonies) were generated using novel culture methods. Minimum inhibitory concentration and minimum bactericidal concentration of five antimicrobial agents (doxycycline, amoxicillin, tigecycline, metronidazole, and tinidazole) against spirochetal forms of B. burgdorferi were evaluated using the standard published microdilution technique. The susceptibility of spirochetal and round body forms to the antibiotics was then tested using fluorescent microscopy (BacLight viability staining) and dark field microscopy (direct cell counting), and these results were compared with the microdilution technique. Qualitative and quantitative effects of the antibiotics against biofilm-like colonies were assessed using fluorescent microscopy and dark field microscopy, respectively. Results: Doxycycline reduced spirochetal structures ~90% but increased the number of round body forms about twofold. Amoxicillin reduced spirochetal forms by ~85%–90% and round body forms by ~68%, while treatment with metronidazole led to reduction of spirochetal structures by ~90% and round body forms by ~80%. Tigecycline and tinidazole treatment reduced both spirochetal and round body forms by ~80%–90%. When quantitative effects on biofilm-like colonies were evaluated, the five antibiotics reduced formation of these colonies by only 30%–55%. In terms of qualitative effects, only tinidazole reduced viable organisms by ~90%. Following treatment with the other antibiotics, viable organisms were detected in 70%–85% of the biofilm-like colonies. Conclusion: Antibiotics have varying effects on the different morphological forms of B. burgdorferi. Persistence of via
On-demand sedation with propofol for colonoscopy—A prospective pilot study of the influence on short-term memory, psychomotor function and postural stability*  [PDF]
Mogens R?rb?k Madsen
Open Journal of Clinical Diagnostics (OJCD) , 2013, DOI: 10.4236/ojcd.2013.33023
Abstract: Background: After sedated colonoscopy, patients are discharged on the basis of their subjective judgment that they have recovered, corroborated by the nursing staff. The aim of this study was to assess objectively whether patients were in fact fully recovered at the time of discharge, and to demonstrate whether the methods of testing applied could detect any influence of sedation on short-term memory, psychomotor function and postural stability. Methods: Twenty-two patients were investigated. At the beginning of the procedure, a defined bolus of propofol/alfentanil was given intravenously. During the procedure, an additional bolus was injected one or more times as requested by the patient. After colonoscopy, the patients stayed in the recovery room until the patients judged that they had recovered completely, which was also the judgement of the nursing staff at that time. Before colonoscopy and again before discharge, tests were performed of short-term memory, psychomotor function and postural stability (balance). Results: A positive correlation was found between the duration of colonoscopy and the amount of sedative given (p < 0.03). No differences in short-term memory or postural control were found when measurements obtained before and after colonoscopy were compared. Reaction time was prolonged significantly after colonoscopy (p < 0.01), which was mainly due to prolongation of perception time (p < 0.003). No correlation was found between the observed reduction in psychomotor function and the amount of sedative given. Conclusions: The introduction of ultrashort-acting sedative and hypnotic agents has facilitated out-patient colonoscopy. However, although they feel that they have recovered fully, some patients are still affected by the sedative at the time of discharge, as demonstrated by tests of short-term memory, reaction time and postural stability.
Tracking of industrial objects by using CAD models
Harald Wuest,Didier Stricker
Journal of Virtual Reality and Broadcasting , 2007,
Abstract: In this paper we present a model-based approach for real-time camera pose estimation in industrial scenarios. The line model which is used for tracking is generated by rendering a polygonal model and extracting contours out of the rendered scene. By un-projecting a point on the contour with the depth value stored in the z-buffer, the 3D coordinates of the contour can be calculated. For establishing 2D/3D correspondences the 3D control points on the contour are projected into the image and a perpendicular search for gradient maxima for every point on the contour is performed. Multiple hypotheses of 2D image points corresponding to a 3D control point make the pose estimation robust against ambiguous edges in the image.
Borrelia burgdorferi aggrecanase activity: more evidence for persistent infection in Lyme disease
Raphael B. Stricker
Frontiers in Cellular and Infection Microbiology , 2013, DOI: 10.3389/fcimb.2013.00040
Abstract: Lyme disease is the most common tickborne illness in the world today. A recent study describes for the first time an enzyme produced by the spirochetal agent of Lyme disease, Borrelia burgdorferi, that cleaves aggrecan, a proteoglycan found in joints and connective tissue. Discovery of the spirochetal aggrecanase raises many questions about the pathogenesis of Lyme arthritis and lends support to the concept of persistent B. burgdorferi infection in patients with chronic Lyme disease symptoms.
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