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Search Results: 1 - 10 of 201568 matches for " Stephen D. Christman "
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Asymmetry in Resting Alpha Activity: Effects of Handedness  [PDF]
Ruth E. Propper, Jenna Pierce, Mark W. Geisler, Stephen D. Christman, Nathan Bellorado
Open Journal of Medical Psychology (OJMP) , 2012, DOI: 10.4236/ojmp.2012.14014
Abstract: Study Aim: Frontal electroencephalographic (EEG) alpha band power during rest shows increased right, and/or de-creased left, hemisphere activity under conditions of state or trait withdrawal-associated affect. Non-right-handers (NRH) are more likely to have mental illnesses and dispositions that involve such withdrawal-related affect. The aim of the study was to examine whether NRH might be characterized by increased right, relative to left, hemisphere activity during rest. Methods: The present research investigated that hypothesis by examining resting EEG alpha power in consistently-right-handed (CRH) and NRH individuals. Results: In support of the hypothesis, NRH demonstrated de-creased right hemisphere alpha power, and therefore increased right hemisphere activity, during rest, compared to CRH. Conclusions: The study demonstrates further support for an association between increased right hemisphere activity and negative affect via an association between such EEG activity and NRH.
Degree of Handedness, but not Direction, is a Systematic Predictor of Cognitive Performance
Eric Prichard,Ruth E. Propper,Stephen D. Christman
Frontiers in Psychology , 2013, DOI: 10.3389/fpsyg.2013.00009
Abstract: A growing body of evidence is reviewed showing that degree of handedness (consistent versus inconsistent) is a more powerful and appropriate way to classify handedness than the traditional one based on direction (right versus left). Experimental studies from the domains of episodic memory retrieval, belief updating/cognitive flexibility, risk perception, and more are described. These results suggest that inconsistent handedness is associated with increased interhemispheric interaction and increased access to processes localized to the right cerebral hemisphere.
Hospital Overcharging
Christman, Kenneth D
Journal of American Physicians and Surgeons , 2006,
Abstract:
Effect of Copper on Growth Characteristics and Disease Control of the Recently Introduced Guignardia citricarpa on Citrus in Florida  [PDF]
Katherine E. M. Hendricks, Ryan S. Donahoo, Pamela D. Roberts, Mary C. Christman
American Journal of Plant Sciences (AJPS) , 2013, DOI: 10.4236/ajps.2013.42037
Abstract: Guignardia citricarpa, the plant pathogenic fungus that causes citrus black spot, was recently introduced into the United States. The development of this disease in the presence of multiple applications of copper per year to manage citrus canker warrants an investigation into the effects of copper on growth of isolates of G. citricarpa from citrus in Florida. Guignardia citricarpa and G. mangiferae isolates, confirmed by internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequencing of ribosomal DNA and DNA homology, were inoculated on non-amended media and media amended with 50 and 500 μg·ml-1 copper sulfate. Radial colony growth was assessed over a 26 to 59 day period. Copper reduced the growth of G. citricarpa isolates in media amended with 500 μg·ml-1 copper but had variable effects on radial growth in media amended with 50 μg·ml-1 copper. There was little effect of copper on the in vitro growth of G. mangiferae isolates. Field application of copper with and without an adjuvant for the control of citrus black spot was undertaken in a commercial grove in Florida in 2011. Spray applications were made on a 23.3 ± 4.7 day interval and fruit accessed between December 2011 and March 2012 for black spot symptoms. Copper failed to reduce the proportion of fruit exhibiting symptoms compared to that of the controls.
Ten Questions You Should Pose to Your Organized Medicine Delegation
Christman, Kenneth
Journal of American Physicians and Surgeons , 2006,
Abstract:
Will Electronic Medical Records Doom Your Practice?
Christman, Kenneth
Journal of American Physicians and Surgeons , 2006,
Abstract:
Maximizing Revenues for Online-Dial-a-Ride
Ananya Christman,William Forcier
Computer Science , 2013,
Abstract: In the classic Dial-a-Ride Problem, a server travels in some metric space to serve requests for rides. Each request has a source, destination, and release time. We study a variation of this problem where each request also has a revenue that is earned if the request is satisfied. The goal is to serve requests within a time limit such that the total revenue is maximized. We first prove that the version of this problem where edges in the input graph have varying weights is NP-complete. We also prove that no algorithm can be competitive for this problem. We therefore consider the version where edges in the graph have unit weight and develop a 2-competitive algorithm for this problem.
Cerebral Fat Embolism Syndrome from Penetrating Trauma: A Rare Cause-and-Effect  [PDF]
Stephen J. Gleich,James D. Hannon
Open Journal of Anesthesiology (OJAnes) , 2013, DOI: 10.4236/ojanes.2013.34052
Abstract: A 42 year-old male sustained an accidental rifle gunshot wound to his left foot, resulting in fracture deformities of the calcaneus, navicular, cuneiform, 1st and 2nd metatarsal bases, and talus. As he was transported to our trauma center, he developed progressive encephalopathy. Urgent external fixator placement under general anesthesia was postponed due to his encephalopathy of unknown etiology. Brain magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated a “starfield” pattern of infarcts, consistent with cerebral fat embolism syndrome. Subsequently, he underwent uneventful general anesthesia. The patient was managed supportively and continued to have persistent neurologic dysfunction two months after injury.
Cerebral Fat Embolism Syndrome from Penetrating Trauma: A Rare Cause-and-Effect  [PDF]
Stephen J. Gleich, James D. Hannon
Open Journal of Anesthesiology (OJAnes) , 2013, DOI: 10.4236/ojanes.2013.34052
Abstract:

A 42 year-old male sustained an accidental rifle gunshot wound to his left foot, resulting in fracture deformities of the calcaneus, navicular, cuneiform, 1st and 2nd metatarsal bases, and talus. As he was transported to our trauma center, he developed progressive encephalopathy. Urgent external fixator placement under general anesthesia was postponed due to his encephalopathy of unknown etiology. Brain magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated a “starfield” pattern of infarcts, consistent with cerebral fat embolism syndrome. Subsequently, he underwent uneventful general anesthesia. The patient was managed supportively and continued to have persistent neurologic dysfunction two months after injury.

Increased Infarct Wall Thickness by a Bio-Inert Material Is Insufficient to Prevent Negative Left Ventricular Remodeling after Myocardial Infarction
Aboli A. Rane, Joyce S. Chuang, Amul Shah, Diane P. Hu, Nancy D. Dalton, Yusu Gu, Kirk L. Peterson, Jeffrey H. Omens, Karen L. Christman
PLOS ONE , 2011, DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0021571
Abstract: Background Several injectable materials have been shown to preserve or improve cardiac function as well as prevent or slow left ventricular (LV) remodeling post-myocardial infarction (MI). However, it is unclear as to whether it is the structural support or the bioactivity of these polymers that lead to beneficial effects. Herein, we examine how passive structural enhancement of the LV wall by an increase in wall thickness affects cardiac function post-MI using a bio-inert, non-degradable synthetic polymer in an effort to better understand the mechanisms by which injectable materials affect LV remodeling. Methods and Results Poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) gels of storage modulus G′ = 0.5±0.1 kPa were injected and polymerized in situ one week after total occlusion of the left coronary artery in female Sprague Dawley rats. The animals were imaged using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at 7±1 day(s) post-MI as a baseline and again post-injection 49±4 days after MI. Infarct wall thickness was statistically increased in PEG gel injected vs. control animals (p<0.01). However, animals in the polymer and control groups showed decreases in cardiac function in terms of end diastolic volume, end systolic volume and ejection fraction compared to baseline (p<0.01). The cellular response to injection was also similar in both groups. Conclusion The results of this study demonstrate that passive structural reinforcement alone was insufficient to prevent post-MI remodeling, suggesting that bioactivity and/or cell infiltration due to degradation of injectable materials are likely playing a key role in the preservation of cardiac function, thus providing a deeper understanding of the influencing properties of biomaterials necessary to prevent post-MI negative remodeling.
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