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Search Results: 1 - 10 of 2441 matches for " Stephanie Gyaase "
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Making Family Planning Services Relevant to Adolescents: Perspectives from Rural Communities in Central Ghana  [PDF]
Yeetey Enuameh, Charlotte Tawiah, Samuel Afari-Asiedu, Obed Ernest A. Nettey, Abubakari Sulemana, Emmanuel Mahama, George Adjei, Ellen Boamah, Alex Manu, Stephanie Gyaase, Charles Zandoh, Nelson Amanfo, Kwaku Poku Asante, Timothy Letsa, Seth Owusu-Agyei
Open Journal of Preventive Medicine (OJPM) , 2014, DOI: 10.4236/ojpm.2014.411096
Abstract: In lower middle-income countries like Ghana, it is common to find low contraceptive use among adolescents with corresponding high pregnancy outcomes. Evidence points to the fact that the use of contraceptives prevents maternal, neonatal and infant deaths, but in most lower middle-income countries, socio-cultural practices inhibit adolescents’ use. Ensuring the uptake of family planning among adolescents is deemed a necessary means of reducing maternal, neonatal and infant mor-tality. This manuscript seeks to provide contextually relevant approaches to satisfying family planning needs of adolescents in a population lacking it. We employed a qualitative study design from an interpretive paradigm with phenomenology as the methodology to understand societal attitudes towards family planning delivery to adolescents, so as to arrive at contextually appro-priate ways of providing family planning to this needy group. Focused group discussions and in-depth interviews techniques were used in data collection among adolescents, relevant commu-nity opinion leaders and family planning & health services providers. Themes that emerged from data analysis with respect to “perspectives on family planning care delivery to adolescents” and “best ways in addressing adolescents’ family planning needs” are presented, followed by discussion of the issues emerging. A significant and encouraging finding of the study was that opinion leaders and healthcare providers viewed family planning as a means of protecting adolescents against pregnancies and their complications. A key recommendation is for policy makers and political leaders to enact legislations that enable adolescents to have friendly family planning service delivery in all places and at all times.
Family Planning Needs of Adolescents in Predominantly Rural Communities in the Central Part of Ghana  [PDF]
Yeetey Enuameh, Obed Ernest Nettey, Emmanuel Mahama, Charlotte Tawiah, Ellen Boamah, Abubakari Sulemana, George Adjei, Stephanie Gyaase, Samuel Afari Asiedu, Alexander Manu, Charles Zandoh, Kwaku Poku Asante, Seth Owusu-Agyei
Open Journal of Preventive Medicine (OJPM) , 2015, DOI: 10.4236/ojpm.2015.56030
Abstract: The manuscript presents findings of a descriptive analysis of data from a cross-sectional study of adolescents aimed at identifying their family planning needs and the best approaches to addressing them in the Kintampo Districts of Ghana. Data for the paper were from the family planning module of a sexual and reproductive health survey carried out by the Kintampo Health and Demographic Surveillance System in 2011. Adolescents in this study recorded high marital (1.6% females and 0.4% males) and pregnancy rates (11.5% females and 1.5% males). Their knowledge of contraceptive methods was high (87.7% females and 82% males), but utilization was low (17.9% females and 6% males). Most study participants viewed family planning as important to their health and wellbeing (59.6% females and 58.6% males). A minority of adolescents were of the perception that contraceptive use was solely the responsibility of women (41.1% females and 32.4% males); and that the use of contraceptives could lead to promiscuity among women (43.8% females and 42.5% males). Those adolescents who previously had unwanted pregnancies would have accepted some help in preventing it (33.1% females and 9.1% males). Recommendations made by respondents included creating a friendly atmosphere by care providers for family planning services delivery to adolescents. Other suggestions were ensuring that family planning services are available and accessible to adolescents, and educating adolescents on the diverse methods available.
The twisted path from farm subsidies to health care expenditures  [PDF]
Stephanie Bernell
Health (Health) , 2012, DOI: 10.4236/health.2012.412A216
Abstract:

Overweight and obese individuals are at increased risk for many diseases and health conditions, including but not limited to the following: hypertension; osteoarthritis; dyslipidemia; type 2 diabetes; coronary heart disease and stroke. Consequently, individuals who are obese are more likely to use health services and are more likely to use costly health services than non-obese individuals. Between 1987 and 2001, growth in obesity related health expenditures accounted for 27 percent of the growth in inflation-adjusted per capita health care spending. Researchers, popular press and the television news media have paid considerable attention to the effect that farm subsidies have on dietary habits and obesity. Prominent researchers in the field have concluded that US farm subsidies have had a negligible impact on obesity. However, even small increases in obesity rates are associated with higher health care expenditures. The primary intent of this study is to break down the linkages from farm subsidy to health expenditure and shed light on the unintended implications of the farm subsidy program. We find that agricultural subsidies have the potential to influence health care expenditures.

A Contrastive Study of Master Thesis Acknowledgements by Taiwanese and North American Students  [PDF]
Stephanie W. Cheng
Open Journal of Modern Linguistics (OJML) , 2012, DOI: 10.4236/ojml.2012.21002
Abstract: Thesis acknowledgements are a written part genre in which graduate students express their gratitude towards a number of addressees upon completion of theses. Previous studies on thesis acknowledgements have focused on the expressions of gratitude or their generic structure. However, socio-cultural values and norms can shape the ways people express thanks and influence the rhetorical structure of a genre like thesis acknowledgements. The present study compares and contrasts the use of thanking strategies in 60 thesis acknowledgements written in English by Taiwanese and North American master students. Results show that Taiwanese students (TS) use more thanking strategies than North American students (NAS); specifically, they employ more explicit thanking strategies but less implicit thanking strategies than NAS. They also use more complex thanking strategies but less simple thanking strategies than NAS. Interestingly, the two groups vary in the arrangement of addressees and the choice of strategies for various addressees, reflecting different cultural perceptions of expressing gratitude. For example, NAS appear to make a more flexible arrangement of advisors and family members than TS. These subtle differences between TS and NAS thesis acknowledgements reveal Taiwanese and North American students’ embedded socio-pragmatic perceptions of writing this genre.
Where Science Meets Art: Sociology and Social Work  [PDF]
Stephanie Kelly, Tony Stanley
Sociology Mind (SM) , 2012, DOI: 10.4236/sm.2012.24044
Abstract: The nexus of neo-liberalist influences in our current risk society has produced a crisis for both New Zealand sociology and Social Work, playing out in practice domains and in the academy. This paper argues that by co-habituating and co-operating, we may have a tangible way forward. One of the biggest challenges for Social Work practitioners is to come to terms with the role of theory in the practice of their discipline—a discipline that is often fast-paced, but increasingly focused on dealing with one client at a time, and often reduced to a dyad emphasis in practise: that of client and worker. One of the biggest challenges for the sociologist embarking on a career in research is to come to terms with sociology as methodological toolkit for social activism where knowledge of theory can be applied toward sustained societal change. Both offer a methodological approach to understanding the human condition in context. Both disciplines are at risk because of neo-liberalisation, and this, we argue must be avoided by a move toward each other.
Student Experience and Ubiquitous Learning in Higher Education: Impact of Wireless and Cloud Applications  [PDF]
Vladlena Benson, Stephanie Morgan
Creative Education (CE) , 2013, DOI: 10.4236/ce.2013.48A001
Abstract:

Mobile learning apps for smartphones and tablet computer devices have entered Higher Education (HE) market. While universities are investing in new technologies, they also look into cost reduction strategies, including cloud computing. We draw upon a case study of a successful migration to mobile virtual environment and effective use of cloud computing at a UK university. Success factors and challenges of these emerging technologies in HE are discussed. The paper concludes with the consideration of student experience implications and research questions which need addressing in the area of ubiquitous learning.



Popularity, likeability, and risk-taking in middle adolescence  [PDF]
Stephanie Hawke, Elizabeth Rieger
Health (Health) , 2013, DOI: 10.4236/health.2013.56A3007
Abstract:

This study investigated the roles of adolescent popularity and likeability in eight domains of risk-taking in Australian grade 9 students (53% girls). The eight domains included previously examined areas of aggressive behaviours, alcohol use, and sexual intercourse, and areas where there is scarce information, including antisocial activities, unprotected intercourse, body image-related risk-taking, unsafe road practices, and stranger-related risk-taking. The results indicated a clear association between popularity and higher risk-taking in five of the eight domains. This is contrasted with likeability, which was not directly related to risk-taking aside from one two-way interaction with gender for sexual intercourse. The findings demonstrate the importance of including a broader range of risk-taking activities when considering popularity, particularly stranger-related risk-taking.

Gender Differences in the Validity of Career Interest Inventories  [PDF]
Stephanie T. Burns
Psychology (PSYCH) , 2014, DOI: 10.4236/psych.2014.58089
Abstract:

Predictive validity (including hit rates, kappa coefficients, and chance expectancy rates) between standard scoring and person matching was compared by gender based upon ex post facto data collected on 5143 medical students who had taken a career interest inventory and entered their medical residency. Hit rate accuracy for person matching with females and males in this study was lower than standard scoring. However, person matching demonstrated greater gender balancing in first match hit rates. Additionally, person matching increased career interest inventory validity over standard scoring as it has the greater ability to a) differentiate between and b) assign to specific occupational groups for females and males. Furthermore, person matching has the potential to offer female and male test takers the ability to receive narrative career data, which could improve the career decision making process over the scoring reports of career interest inventories using standard scoring.

Evaluation of Sensory Properties of Probiotic Yogurt Containing Food Products with Prebiotic Fibresin Mwanza, Tanzania  [PDF]
Stephanie L. Irvine, Sharareh Hekmat
Food and Nutrition Sciences (FNS) , 2011, DOI: 10.4236/fns.2011.25061
Abstract: Yogurt becomes a functional food upon incorporating probiotics-live microorganisms which when adequately administered confer health benefits. Prebiotics are fermentable fibres that nourish beneficial gastrointestinal microflora enhance the functionality of probiotics. This research aimed to improve the acceptability and functionality of probiotic yogurt produced in Mwanza, Tanzania by incorporating probiotic food ingredients. The probiotic culture Lactobacillus rhamnosus GR-1 and standard yogurt cultures Lactobacillus delbrueckii bulgaricus and Steptococcus thermophilus were used to manufacture yogurt, then locally available prebiotic food ingredients containing fructooligosaccha- ride/inulin were incorporated. A nine-point facial hedonic scale was used to evaluate five yogurt samples. A mean score between one and three indicated that the sample product was well accepted. Probiotic yogurt containing onions, garlic and sweet potato received a score of 1.6 ± 0.84 (p < 0.01); banana and honey was 2.5 ± 1.72 (p = 0.02); and leafy greens, onions and garlic was 2.6 ± 1.54 (p = 0.04). Samples containing beans, 4.4 ± 1.99 (p > 0.90), and plantains, 5.3 ± 2.56 (p > 0.90) were not well accepted. Sweet, mildly flavored prebiotic ingredients were most successfully incorpo- rated into probiotic yogurt in Mwanza.
Wet Soil Redox Chemistry as Affected by Organic Matter and Nitrate  [PDF]
Duane T. Gardiner, Stephanie James
American Journal of Climate Change (AJCC) , 2012, DOI: 10.4236/ajcc.2012.14017
Abstract:

Wet soil microcosms were established to determine effects of organic matter and nitrate additions on microbial respiration and redox potentials. Organic matter (1%) and nitrate (100 ppm and 200 ppm) treatments were applied in factorial combination. Soil pH, redox potential, and CO2 emissions were measured. Data were analyzed by ANOVA for repeated measures and separately by sampling day. Addition of organic matter significantly (P < 0.05) and consistently increased CO2 emissions and decreased redox potentials. On Day 42 nitrate significantly (P < 0.05) increased redox values. This study indicates a tendency for organic matter to decrease soil redox potential both in absolute terms and relative to the suboxic-anoxic boundary. Our findings portend that additions of organic matter may quickly and markedly decrease soil redox potentials and increase CO2 emissions in wetlands, whereas additions of nitrate may have complex and sporadic effects on redox potentials.

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