oalib

Publish in OALib Journal

ISSN: 2333-9721

APC: Only $99

Submit

Any time

2020 ( 1 )

2019 ( 4 )

2018 ( 13 )

2017 ( 5 )

Custom range...

Search Results: 1 - 10 of 9854 matches for " Stefan Burdach "
All listed articles are free for downloading (OA Articles)
Page 1 /9854
Display every page Item
Understanding tumor heterogeneity as functional compartments - superorganisms revisited
Thomas GP Grunewald, Saskia M Herbst, Jürgen Heinze, Stefan Burdach
Journal of Translational Medicine , 2011, DOI: 10.1186/1479-5876-9-79
Abstract: Accordingly, we propose a model in which clonal expansion and cumulative acquisition of genetic alterations produce tumor compartments each equipped with distinct traits and thus distinct functions that cooperate to establish clinically apparent tumors. This functional compartment model also suggests mechanisms for the self-construction of tumor stem cell niches. Thus, thinking of a tumor as a superorganism will provide systemic insight into its functional compartmentalization and may even have clinical implications.Cooperation and division of labor are thought to explain many of the major transitions in evolution, in which several simple units form a more complex group [1,2]. When conflict among their constituents is resolved or sufficiently suppressed, such higher biological entities achieve "organismality" at a higher level, i.e., they interact with other such entities as "individuals" [3]. Major transitions are the evolution from independently replicating oligonucleotides into genomes, from prokaryotes to eukaryotes, and from unicellular to multicellular organisms. Another major transition, in which emergent properties arising from cooperation and division of labor are particularly obvious, is the origin of the social insects from solitary organisms. The nests of social insects - ants, termites, and honeybees - consist of hundreds or thousands of individuals, which appear to interact so smoothly and complementarily that the society as whole has been referred to as a "superorganism," in analogy to the well-functioning organism of a multicellular animal [4-10].Superorganisms are societies composed of specialized reproductives (queens and, in termites, kings) and non-reproductive castes. Workers are fully dedicated to support the royal reproductive caste in an altruistic fashion - that is, they normally follow epigenetically programmed algorithms to fulfill their self-sacrificing behavior of brood care, foraging, and colony defense and in this way increase the repr
Immunodominance of Lytic Cycle Antigens in Epstein-Barr Virus-Specific CD4+ T Cell Preparations for Therapy
Dinesh Adhikary, Uta Behrends, Heike Boerschmann, Andrea Pfünder, Stefan Burdach, Andreas Moosmann, Klaus Witter, Georg W. Bornkamm, Josef Mautner
PLOS ONE , 2007, DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0000583
Abstract: Background Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is associated with a number of human malignancies. EBV-positive post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease in solid organ and hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients has been successfully treated by the adoptive transfer of polyclonal EBV-specific T cell lines containing CD4+ and CD8+ T cell components. Although patients receiving T cell preparations with a higher CD4+ T cell proportion show better clinical responses, the specificity of the infused CD4+ component has remained completely unknown. Methodology/Principal Findings We generated LCL-stimulated T cell lines from 21 donors according to clinical protocols, and analyzed the antigen specificity of the CD4+ component in EBV-specific T cell preparations using a genetically engineered EBV mutant that is unable to enter the lytic cycle, and recombinantly expressed and purified EBV proteins. Surprisingly, CD4+ T cell lines from acutely and persistently EBV-infected donors consistently responded against EBV lytic cycle antigens and autoantigens, but barely against latent cycle antigens of EBV hitherto considered principal immunotherapeutic targets. Lytic cycle antigens were predominantly derived from structural proteins of the virus presented on MHC II via receptor-mediated uptake of released viral particles, but also included abundant infected cell proteins whose presentation involved intercellular protein transfer. Importantly, presentation of virion antigens was severely impaired by acyclovir treatment of stimulator cells, as currently performed in most clinical protocols. Conclusions/Significance These results indicate that structural antigens of EBV are the immunodominant targets of CD4+ T cells in LCL-stimulated T cell preparations. These findings add to our understanding of the immune response against this human tumor-virus and have important implications for the improvement of immunotherapeutic strategies against EBV.
Lumbar disc herniation in three patients with cystic fibrosis: a case series
Christian Denne, Anna E Vogl-Voswinckel, Harald Wurmser, Marc Steinborn, Manfred Spaeth, Armin Gruebl, Stefan Burdach
Journal of Medical Case Reports , 2011, DOI: 10.1186/1752-1947-5-440
Abstract: We report on three patients with cystic fibrosis who experienced lumbar disc herniation in the course of their disease at ages 19 to 21 years (a 22-year-old Caucasian man, a 23-year-old Caucasian man, and a 21-year-old Caucasian woman). Our third patient eventually died because of her deteriorated pulmonary situation, which was influenced by the lumbar disc herniation as it was not possible for her to perform pulmonary drainage techniques properly because of the pain.Lumbar disc herniation can lead to a vicious cycle for patients with cystic fibrosis as it may promote pulmonary infections. This report highlights the need to investigate patients correctly.Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a lethal chronic pulmonary disease with recurrent acute infective exacerbations, inevitably leading to progressive bronchiectasis and combined ventilatory disorders [1]. With the improved survival rates in recent decades, CF may also be commonly associated with relevant painful conditions caused by complications of the illness and also by therapy itself, which may cause additional suffering [2,3]. Back pain is a chief complaint in patients with cystic fibrosis [4]. It is often due to vertebral fractures as a consequence of a decreased bone mineral density due to use of steroids [5]. Rheumatoid arthritis, spondyloarthropathies, and posture abnormalities such as kyphosis have also been reported in association with CF [6]. Whereas many papers focus on pain in patients with CF, studies on lumbar disc herniation (LDH) in patients with CF have not been reported to date [7].We report on three patients with clinically symptomatic and radiologically proven LDH from our CF clinic. The CF clinic is part of the Department of Pediatrics. The age structure of patients (children, adults) is mixed. In all, 24 of a total of 46 patients from the clinic were older than 18 years according to the Cystic Fibrosis Ambulance System (CFAS) data. The mean age at diagnosis of LDH was 20.5 years. The point prevalence of
GCK-MODY (MODY 2) Caused by a Novel p.Phe330Ser Mutation
Walter Bonfig,Sandra Hermanns,Katharina Warncke,Gabriele Eder,Ilse Engelsberger,Stefan Burdach,Annette Gabriele Ziegler,Peter Lohse
ISRN Pediatrics , 2011, DOI: 10.5402/2011/676549
Abstract: Maturity onset diabetes of the young (MODY) is a monogenic form of diabetes inherited as an autosomal dominant trait. The second most common cause is GCK-MODY due to heterozygous mutations in the GCK gene which impair the glucokinase function through different mechanisms such as enzymatic activity, protein stability, and increased interaction with its receptor. The enzyme normally acts as a glucose sensor in the pancreatic beta cell and regulates insulin secretion. We report here a three-generation nonobese family diagnosed with diabetes. All affected family members presented with mild hyperglycemia and mostly slightly elevated hemoglobin A1c values. Genetic testing revealed a novel heterozygous T → C exchange in exon 8 of the GCK gene which resulted in a phenylalanine330 TTC → serine (TCC)/p.Phe330Ser/F330S substitution. 1. Introduction MODY is a monogenic disease which accounts for 2–5% of all diabetes cases. The most frequent form is HNF-1α-MODY (MODY type 3), which is caused by mutations in the HNF1A gene encoding hepatic nuclear factor 1α. The second most frequent form is GCK-MODY (MODY type 2), which has been shown to be the result of mutations in the GCK gene [1]. The GCK gene maps to chromosome 7p15.3-p15.1 and consists of 12 exons that encode the 465-amino-acid protein glucokinase [2, 3], which is one of four members of the hexokinase family of enzymes. It catalyzes the phosphorylation of glucose as the first step of glycolysis. Glucokinase is exclusively expressed in mammalian liver and pancreatic islet beta cells. The enzyme plays an important regulatory role in glucose metabolism. As a glucose sensor, it regulates insulin secretion in the pancreatic β-cell by changing the glucose phosphorylation rate over a range of physiological glucose concentrations (4–15?mmoL/L; [4]). GCK gene mutations can cause both hypo- and hyperglycemia. Heterozygous inactivating mutations cause GCK-MODY, which mostly presents with mild hyperglycemia and is inherited in an autosomal dominant fashion [5, 6]. Usually, no diabetes-related complications such as nephropathy or retinopathy occur in patients with GCK-MODY. Homozygous or compound heterozygous inactivating GCK mutations result in a more severe phenotype presenting at birth as permanent neonatal diabetes mellitus [7–11]. Heterozygous activating GCK mutations, in contrast, cause persistent hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia of infancy [12–16]. In 1992, GCK was the first MODY gene to be linked to disease in French and UK families [5, 6]. These linkage studies were quickly followed by the identification of the first
Sclerosing Epithelioid Fibrosarcoma of the Bone: A Case Report of High Resistance to Chemotherapy and a Survey of the Literature
Thomas G. P. Grunewald,Irene von Luettichau,Gregor Weirich,Angela Wawer,Uta Behrends,Peter M. Prodinger,Gernot Jundt,Stefan S. Bielack,Reiner Gradinger,Stefan Burdach
Sarcoma , 2010, DOI: 10.1155/2010/431627
Abstract: Sclerosing epithelioid fibrosarcoma (SEF) is a rare soft tissue sarcoma mostly occurring in extraosseous sites. SEF represents a clinically challenging entity especially because no standardized treatment regimens are available. Intraosseous localization is an additional challenge with respect to the therapeutical approach. We report on a 16-year-old patient with SEF of the right proximal tibia. The patient underwent standardized neoadjuvant chemotherapy analogous to the EURAMOS-1 protocol for the treatment of osteosarcoma followed by tumor resection and endoprosthetic reconstruction. Histopathological analysis of the resected tumor showed >90% vital tumor cells suggesting no response to chemotherapy. Therefore, therapy was reassigned to the CWS 2002 High-Risk protocol for the treatment of soft tissue sarcoma. To date (22 months after diagnosis), there is no evidence of relapse or metastasis. Our data suggest that SEF may be resistant to a chemotherapy regimen containing Cisplatin, Doxorubicin, and Methotrexate, which should be considered in planning treatment for patients with SEF.
Sclerosing Epithelioid Fibrosarcoma of the Bone: A Case Report of High Resistance to Chemotherapy and a Survey of the Literature
Thomas G. P. Grunewald,Irene von Luettichau,Gregor Weirich,Angela Wawer,Uta Behrends,Peter M. Prodinger,Gernot Jundt,Stefan S. Bielack,Reiner Gradinger,Stefan Burdach
Sarcoma , 2010, DOI: 10.1155/2010/431627
Abstract: Sclerosing epithelioid fibrosarcoma (SEF) is a rare soft tissue sarcoma mostly occurring in extraosseous sites. SEF represents a clinically challenging entity especially because no standardized treatment regimens are available. Intraosseous localization is an additional challenge with respect to the therapeutical approach. We report on a 16-year-old patient with SEF of the right proximal tibia. The patient underwent standardized neoadjuvant chemotherapy analogous to the EURAMOS-1 protocol for the treatment of osteosarcoma followed by tumor resection and endoprosthetic reconstruction. Histopathological analysis of the resected tumor showed > 9 0 % vital tumor cells suggesting no response to chemotherapy. Therefore, therapy was reassigned to the CWS 2002 High-Risk protocol for the treatment of soft tissue sarcoma. To date (22 months after diagnosis), there is no evidence of relapse or metastasis. Our data suggest that SEF may be resistant to a chemotherapy regimen containing Cisplatin, Doxorubicin, and Methotrexate, which should be considered in planning treatment for patients with SEF. 1. Introduction Sclerosing epithelioid fibrosarcoma (SEF) is an uncommon fibrosarcoma of intermediate-grade malignancy and has lately been recognized as a distinct clinical entity [1]. SEF is a malignancy of the older adult with a mean patient age of 47 years (range 14–87 years) [2], but onset in adolescence has also been reported [1, 3]. Only 10% of patients are younger than 20 years at time of diagnosis. The distribution between sexes seems to be equal [4]. SEFs mainly present as tumors of the lower extremities (39%), followed by the trunk (21%) and upper extremities (14.5%), but also rare locations like pituitary gland, intraspinal or base of penis have been described [1–8]. Typically SEF is complicated by high frequencies of local tumor relapse and distant metastases (30%–40%) [2–4, 9–11]. Metastases mostly occur in lung (70%), bone (41%) and soft tissue [2–4] with a median interval of 7.7 years from diagnosis to first apparent metastasis [1], but according to a recent meta-analysis up to 27% of patients display distant metastases already at time of diagnosis [2]. In addition, SEF shares the potential for lymph node metastasis with other epithelioid malignant soft tissue tumors such as epithelioid sarcoma [12, 13] and epithelioid malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor [14]. Follow-up data indicate that SEF is an aggressive tumor with mortality rates ranging between 25% and 57% [1, 4]. Together with low-grade fibromyxoid sarcoma (FMS) and hyalinizing spindle cell tumor
Dermatitis seborreica en el lactante: Estudio clínico e histológico de 33 casos
JORGE ROSSELOT,RODOLFO BURDACH
Revista chilena de pediatría , 1952,
Abstract:
Síndrome de Schoenlein Henoch
RODOLFO BURDACH,JULIO MENEGHELLO
Revista chilena de pediatría , 1952,
Abstract:
Ictiosis Simplex: Estudio clínico e histopatológico de seis casos
JORGE ROSSELOT,RODOLFO BURDACH
Revista chilena de pediatría , 1951,
Abstract:
Dermatitis gangrenosa infantum
JORGE ROSSELOT,RODOLFO BURDACH
Revista chilena de pediatría , 1950,
Abstract:
Page 1 /9854
Display every page Item


Home
Copyright © 2008-2017 Open Access Library. All rights reserved.