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Search Results: 1 - 10 of 174367 matches for " Solange Artimos de; "
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Influence of Immunopreventable Diseases and AIDS on the Demand of an Infectious Diseases Department in Rio de Janeiro State, Brazil, in the Course of Thirty Years (1965-1994)
SETúBAL, Sérgio;TAVARES, Walter;OLIVEIRA, Solange Artimos de;
Revista do Instituto de Medicina Tropical de S?o Paulo , 1998, DOI: 10.1590/S0036-46651998000300010
Abstract: brazil's nosologic profile has been sustaining profound modifications. some occurred because of massive immunization campaigns and socioeconomic and demographic trends. some yet were pure nosologic transitions, such as the emergence of aids. in this demand study it is described how these changes reflected on the 8,630 admissions of an infectious diseases department in niterói, along a thirty year period. brazilian rural endemic diseases were infrequent (3.45%). men predominated (62%) all the time, in all age strata and in nearly all diseases. children under fifteen predominated until 1983. there was, in the case of tetanus, a striking rise in age strata. institutional mortality dropped from 31% in 1965 to 10% in 1984, but rose since then to 15% in 1994. however, if aids patients had not been computed, mortality would have kept descending till 8% at the end of the study period. the crescent unimportance of immunopreventable diseases paralleled with the growing prominence of aids. in less than a decade, aids ranked fifth among the most frequent diseases in the whole period of thirty years. as opposed to the immunopreventable diseases, neither meningitides nor pneumonia appear to be in decline. aids, by its exponential incidence, by its chronic character, and by the uncountable opportunistic infections it determines, imposes itself as a challenge for the coming years.
Influence of Immunopreventable Diseases and AIDS on the Demand of an Infectious Diseases Department in Rio de Janeiro State, Brazil, in the Course of Thirty Years (1965-1994)
SETúBAL Sérgio,TAVARES Walter,OLIVEIRA Solange Artimos de
Revista do Instituto de Medicina Tropical de S?o Paulo , 1998,
Abstract: Brazil's nosologic profile has been sustaining profound modifications. Some occurred because of massive immunization campaigns and socioeconomic and demographic trends. Some yet were pure nosologic transitions, such as the emergence of AIDS. In this demand study it is described how these changes reflected on the 8,630 admissions of an Infectious Diseases Department in Niterói, along a thirty year period. Brazilian rural endemic diseases were infrequent (3.45%). Men predominated (62%) all the time, in all age strata and in nearly all diseases. Children under fifteen predominated until 1983. There was, in the case of tetanus, a striking rise in age strata. Institutional mortality dropped from 31% in 1965 to 10% in 1984, but rose since then to 15% in 1994. However, if AIDS patients had not been computed, mortality would have kept descending till 8% at the end of the study period. The crescent unimportance of immunopreventable diseases paralleled with the growing prominence of AIDS. In less than a decade, AIDS ranked fifth among the most frequent diseases in the whole period of thirty years. As opposed to the immunopreventable diseases, neither meningitides nor pneumonia appear to be in decline. AIDS, by its exponential incidence, by its chronic character, and by the uncountable opportunistic infections it determines, imposes itself as a challenge for the coming years.
Clinical and epidemiological aspects of human parvovirus B19 infection in an urban area in Brazil (Niterói city area, State of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil)
Oliveira Solange Artimos de,Camacho Luiz Antonio Bastos,Pereira Antonio Carlos de Medeiros,Faillace Tereza Filomena
Memórias do Instituto Oswaldo Cruz , 2002,
Abstract: This study was designed to analyse the clinical and epidemiological data from human parvovirus B19 cases in a six-year study of rash diseases conduct in an urban area in Brazil (Niterói city area, State of Rio de Janeiro). A total of 673 patients with acute rash diseases were seen at two primary health care units and at a general hospital. A clotted blood sample was collected from all subjects at the time of consultation. Forty-nine per cent (330 cases) of the patients were negative for dengue, rubella and measles IgM or for low avidity IgG to HHV-6. Of these 330, 105 (31.8%) were identified as IgM positive to parvovirus B19 by using an antibody capture EIA. During the study period, three distinct peaks of parvovirus infection were detected, suggesting that the disease appears to cycle in approximately 4-5 years. B19 infection was characterized by variable combinations of fever, flu-like symptoms, arthropathy, and gastrointestinal symptoms. Frequency of fever and arthropathy was substantially higher in adults, 75% [chi2 (1 D.F.) = 11.39, p = 0.0007] and 62.5% [chi2 (1 D.F.) = 29.89, p = 0.0000], respectively. "Slapped-cheek" appearance and reticular or lace-like rash were seen in only 30.1% of the children. No adult presented this typical rash. The lack of the typical rash pattern in a large proportion of parvovirus B19 and the similarity of clinical manifestations to other rash diseases, specially to rubella, highlight the difficulty of diagnosing B19 infection on clinical grounds alone.
Two family members with a syndrome of headache and rash caused by human parvovirus B19
Pereira, Antonio Carlos M.;Barros, Roberto Alexandre Q.;Nascimento, Jussara Pereira do;Oliveira, Solange Artimos de;
Brazilian Journal of Infectious Diseases , 2001, DOI: 10.1590/S1413-86702001000100006
Abstract: human parvovirus b19 infection can cause erythema infectiosum (ei) and several other clinical presentations. central nervous system (cns) involvement is rare, and only a few reports of encephalitis and aseptic meningitis have been published. here, we describe 2 cases of b19 infection in a family presenting different clinical features. a 30 year old female with a 7-day history of headache, malaise, myalgias, joint pains, and rash was seen. physical examination revealed a maculopapular rash on the patient's body, and arthritis of the hands. she completely recovered in 1 week. two days before, her 6 year old son had been admitted to a clinic with a 1-day history of fever, headache, abdominal pain and vomiting. on admission, he was alert, and physical examination revealed neck stiffness, kerning and brudzinski signs, and a petechial rash on his trunk and extremities. cerebrospinal fluid analysis was normal. he completely recovered in 5 days. acute and convalescent sera of both patients were positive for specific igm antibody to b19. human parvovirus b19 should be considered in the differential diagnosis of aseptic meningitis, particularly during outbreaks of erythema infectiosum. the disease may mimic meningococcemia and bacterial meningitis.
Diagnosis of rubella infection by detecting specific immunoglobulin M antibodies in saliva samples: a clinic-based study in Niterói, RJ, Brazil
Oliveira Solange Artimos de,Siqueira Marilda Mendon?a,Brown David W.G.,Litton Pamella
Revista da Sociedade Brasileira de Medicina Tropical , 2000,
Abstract: This study was designed to investigate whether saliva could be a feasible alternative to serum for the diagnosis of recent rubella infection in a clinic setting. Forty-five paired blood and saliva samples collected 1 to 29 days after onset of illness were tested for specific immunoglobulin (Ig) M by antibody-capture radioimmunoassay (MACRIA). Rubella IgM was detected in all serum samples and in 38 (84.4%) saliva specimens. Forty-six serum and saliva samples from other patients with rash diseases were tested by MACRIA for control purposes and two saliva specimens were reactive. The saliva test had specificity of 96%. These results indicate that salivary IgM detection may be a convenient non-invasive alternative to serum for investigation of recent rubella cases, especially for disease surveillance and control programmes.
Two family members with a syndrome of headache and rash caused by human parvovirus B19
Pereira Antonio Carlos M.,Barros Roberto Alexandre Q.,Nascimento Jussara Pereira do,Oliveira Solange Artimos de
Brazilian Journal of Infectious Diseases , 2001,
Abstract: Human parvovirus B19 infection can cause erythema infectiosum (EI) and several other clinical presentations. Central nervous system (CNS) involvement is rare, and only a few reports of encephalitis and aseptic meningitis have been published. Here, we describe 2 cases of B19 infection in a family presenting different clinical features. A 30 year old female with a 7-day history of headache, malaise, myalgias, joint pains, and rash was seen. Physical examination revealed a maculopapular rash on the patient's body, and arthritis of the hands. She completely recovered in 1 week. Two days before, her 6 year old son had been admitted to a clinic with a 1-day history of fever, headache, abdominal pain and vomiting. On admission, he was alert, and physical examination revealed neck stiffness, Kerning and Brudzinski signs, and a petechial rash on his trunk and extremities. Cerebrospinal fluid analysis was normal. He completely recovered in 5 days. Acute and convalescent sera of both patients were positive for specific IgM antibody to B19. Human parvovirus B19 should be considered in the differential diagnosis of aseptic meningitis, particularly during outbreaks of erythema infectiosum. The disease may mimic meningococcemia and bacterial meningitis.
Clinical presentation of parvovirus B19 infection in HIV-infected patients with and without AIDS
Setúbal Sérgio,Jorge-Pereira Maria Cristina,Sant'Anna Anadayr Leite Martins de,Oliveira Solange Artimos de
Revista da Sociedade Brasileira de Medicina Tropical , 2003,
Abstract: Human parvovirus B19 replicates in erythrocyte precursors. Usually, there are no apparent hematological manifestations. However, in individuals with high erythrocyte turnover, as in patients with sickle-cell disease and in the fetus, the infection may lead to severe transient aplasia and hydrops fetalis, respectively. In AIDS patients, persistent infection may result in chronic anemia. By contrast, in HIV-positive patients without AIDS the infection evolves as a mild exanthematous disease. Two clinical descriptions exemplify these forms of presentation. In the first, an AIDS patient presented with bone marrow failure that responded to immunoglobulin. In the second, an HIV-positive patient without AIDS had a morbilliform rash, and needed no treatment. Knowing that an AIDS patient has chronic B19 anemia lessens concern about drug anemia; protects the patient from invasive diagnostic maneuvers; and prevents the patient from disseminating the infection. In AIDS patients with pure red cell aplasia, a search for parvovirus B19 DNA in the serum or in the bone marrow is warranted.
Viremic blood donor found by a rapid screening method in a season of high human parvovirus B19 activity in Niterói, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
Setúbal, Sérgio;Cárdias, Cláudia Alessandra da Silva;Oliveira, Solange Artimos de;Nascimento, Jussara Pereira do;
Memórias do Instituto Oswaldo Cruz , 2004, DOI: 10.1590/S0074-02762004000100017
Abstract: erythrovirus b19 infection is usually benign but may have serious consequences in patients with hemolytic anemia (transient aplastic crisis), immunodeficiency (in whom persistent infection can lead to chronic bone marrow failure with anemia), or who are in the first or second trimester of gestation (spontaneous abortion, hydrops fetalis, and fetal death). being non-enveloped, b19 resists most inactivation methods and can be transmitted by transfusion. b19 is difficult to cultivate and native virus is usually obtained from viremic blood. as specific antibodies may be absent, and there is no reliable immunological method for antigen detection, hybridization or polymerase chain reaction are needed for detecting viremia. a rapid method, gel hemagglutination (diamed id-parvovirus b19 antigen test), can disclose highly viremic donations, whose elimination lessens the viral burden in pooled blood products and may even render them non-infectious. in order to obtain native antigen and to determine the frequency of viremic donors, we applied this test to blood donors in a period of high viral activity in our community. positive or indeterminate results were re-tested by dot-blot hybridization. we tested 472 donors in 1998 and 831 ones in 1999. one viremic donor was found in 1999. we suggest that in periods of high community viral activity the gel hemagglutination test may be useful in avoiding highly viremic blood being added to plasma pools or directly transfused to patients under risk.
Diagnosis of human herpesvirus 6B primary infection by polymerase chain reaction in young children with exanthematic disease
Magalh?es, Ivna de Melo;Martins, Rebeca Vasquez Novo;Vianna, Renata Oliveira;Oliveira, Solange Artimos;Cavalcanti, Silvia Maria Baeta;
Revista da Sociedade Brasileira de Medicina Tropical , 2011, DOI: 10.1590/S0037-86822011005000021
Abstract: introduction: exanthem subitum is a classical rash disease of early childhood caused by human herpesvirus 6b (hhv-6b). however, the rash is frequently misdiagnosed as that of either measles or rubella. methods: in this study, a nested multiplex polymerase chain reaction (pcr) was used to diagnose hhv-6b primary infection, differentiate it from infections caused by hhv-6a and compare it to antibody avidity tests. the samples were separated into case group and control group according to the results of the indirect immunofluorescence assay (ifa) technique. results: from the saliva samples analyzed, hhv-6a dna was detected in 3.2% of the case group and in 2.6% of the control group. regarding hhv-6b, pcr detected viral dna in 4.8% of the case group and in 1.3% of the control group. among the serum samples studied, a frequency of 1.7% was determined for hhv-6a in the case group and 1.2% in the control group. pcr did not detect hhv-6b dna in serum samples. the sensitivity and specificity of the pcr technique ranged from 0% to 4.8% and 97.5% to 100%, respectively, compared to ifa. conclusions: the pcr technique was not suitable for diagnosing primary infection by hhv-6b in children with exanthematic disease and should not substitute the ifa.
Manifesta es articulares nas viroses exantemáticas
Oliveira Solange Artimos de,Camacho Luís A.B.,Bettini Lílian Rachel,Fernandes Daniele Guerreiro
Revista da Sociedade Brasileira de Medicina Tropical , 1999,
Abstract: A freqüência de manifesta es articulares foi avaliada em 251 pacientes com diagnóstico clínico e laboratorial (detec o de IgM por ensaio imunoenzimático) de virose exantemática. As artropatias (artralgia e/ou artrite) foram mais observadas nos casos de dengue (49%) e de rubéola (38,2%) do que naqueles com parvovirose humana (30%) e sarampo (28,1%). Com exce o do sarampo, as artropatias predominaram nos adultos (315 anos de idade), sendo tal diferen a estatisticamente significativa. A ocorrência maior de artropatias em adultos foi mais evidente nos pacientes com parvovirose (75%), rubéola (65%) e dengue (57,7%) do que naqueles com sarampo (31%). As queixas articulares também predominaram nos pacientes do sexo feminino para todas as viroses avaliadas. Os resultados encontrados demonstram o freqüente acometimento articular nas doen as estudadas, e indicam a necessidade de comprova o laboratorial para o diagnóstico diferencial entre elas.
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