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Search Results: 1 - 10 of 10062 matches for " Simon Hatcher "
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Te Ira Tangata: A Zelen randomised controlled trial of a treatment package including problem solving therapy compared to treatment as usual in Maori who present to hospital after self harm
Simon Hatcher, Nicole Coupe, Mason Durie, Hinemoa Elder, Rees Tapsell, Karen Wikiriwhi, Varsha Parag
Trials , 2011, DOI: 10.1186/1745-6215-12-117
Abstract: We propose to use a double consent Zelen design where participants are randomised prior to giving consent to enrol a representative cohort of patients. The main outcome will be the number of Maori scoring below nine on the Beck Hopelessness Scale. Secondary outcomes will be hospital repetition at one year; self reported self harm; anxiety; depression; quality of life; social function; and hospital use at three months and one year.A strength of the study is that it is a pragmatic trial which aims to recruit Maori using a Maori clinical team and protocol. It does not exclude people if English is not their first language. A potential limitation is the analysis of the results which is complex and may underestimate any effect if a large number of people refuse their consent in the group randomised to problem solving therapy as they will effectively cross over to the treatment as usual group. This study is the first randomised control trial to explicitly use cultural assessment and management.Australia and New Zealand Clinical Trials Register (ANZCTR): ACTRN12609000952246Maori are the indigenous people of New Zealand and make up about 15% of the population. Māori have a one year prevalence rate of "suicide attempts" that is three times higher than non-M?ori (0.9% twelve month prevalence compared to 0.3% in non-Maori) [1] and have a suicide rate that is about 30% higher than non-Maori (13.3/100,000 compared to 10.6/100,000)[2]. The challenge is to provide effective treatment for Maori who present to hospital with self harm that is culturally acceptable and meets the obligations of the Treaty of Waitangi.There are over 5000 hospitalisations for self harm each year in New Zealand and a history of self harm is the most powerful predictor of subsequent suicide with about 1% of people going on to kill themselves in the year after a self harm attempt [3]. In the most recently updated Cochrane review of treatments for self harm no conclusive evidence was found for the efficacy of
The ACCESS study a Zelen randomised controlled trial of a treatment package including problem solving therapy compared to treatment as usual in people who present to hospital after self-harm: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial
Simon Hatcher, Cynthia Sharon, Allan House, Sunny Collings, Varsha Parag, Nicola Collins
Trials , 2011, DOI: 10.1186/1745-6215-12-135
Abstract: We propose to use a double consent Zelen design where participants are randomised prior to giving consent to enrol a large representative cohort of patients. The main outcome will be hospital attendance following repetition of self-harm, in the 12 months after recruitment with secondary outcomes of self reported self-harm, hopelessness, anxiety, depression, quality of life, social function and hospital use at three months and one year.A strength of the study is that it is a pragmatic trial which aims to recruit large numbers and does not exclude people if English is not their first language. A potential limitation is the analysis of the results which is complex and may underestimate any effect if a large number of people refuse their consent in the group randomised to problem solving therapy as they will effectively cross over to the treatment as usual group. However the primary analysis is a true intention to treat analysis of everyone randomised which includes both those who consent and do not consent to participate in the study. This provides information about how the intervention will work in practice in a representative population which is a major advance in this study compared to what has been done before.Australia and New Zealand Clinical Trials Register (ANZCTR): ACTRN12609000641291Hospital attendance following self-harm is important because it is common, and it is a risk for subsequent suicide and for increased mortality from all causes. In 2006 there were 5400 hospitalisations for intentional self-harm in New Zealand, equating to an annual rate of 151.7 per 100,000 population [1]. However this figure is likely to be a considerable underestimate as a result of the way the data are collected with different hospitals having different rules about what is counted as a hospitalisation and different ways of coding self-harm. In other countries self-harm is one of the commonest reasons for presentation to the emergency department [2]. Self-harm is also important b
A short exposition of the Madsen-Weiss theorem
Allen Hatcher
Mathematics , 2011,
Abstract: This is an exposition of a proof of the Madsen-Weiss Theorem, which asserts that the homology of mapping class groups of surfaces, in a stable dimension range, is isomorphic to the homology of a certain infinite loopspace that arises naturally when one applies the "scanning method". The proof given here utilizes simplifications introduced by Galatius and Randal-Williams.
The Kirby torus trick for surfaces
Allen Hatcher
Mathematics , 2013,
Abstract: This is an expository paper giving a proof of the existence and uniqueness of smooth structures (hence also PL structures) on topological surfaces. Most published proofs rely on the topological Schoenflies theorem, but here we use instead the Kirby torus trick. This has the advantage of reducing the point-set topology in the proof to practically nothing, replacing it by a few basic facts about smooth surfaces. Uniqueness of smooth structures is proved in the strong form that every homeomorphism between smooth surfaces is isotopic to a diffeomorphism.
The cyclic cycle complex of a surface
Allen Hatcher
Mathematics , 2008,
Abstract: A contractible simplicial complex is constructed that parametrizes different ways of representing a fixed one-dimensional homology class in a closed orientable surface by isotopy classes of systems of disjoint oriented simple closed curves. This is a variant on an earlier construction of Bestvina-Bux-Margalit.
Spaces of Incompressible Surfaces
Allen Hatcher
Mathematics , 1999,
Abstract: This is a "software upgrade" to a paper originally published in 1976, with cleaner statements and improved proofs. The main result is that, in a Haken 3-manifold, the space of all incompressible surfaces in a single isotopy class is contractible, except when the surface is the fiber of a surface bundle structure, in which case the space of all surfaces isotopic to the fiber has the homotopy type of a circle (the fibers). The main application from the 1976 paper is also rederived, the theorem (proved independently by Ivanov) that the diffeomorphism group of a Haken 3-manifold has contractible components, except in the case of certain Seifert manifolds when the components of the diffeomorphism group have the homotopy type of a circle or torus acting on the manifold.
Pants Decompositions of Surfaces
Allen Hatcher
Mathematics , 1999,
Abstract: We consider collections of disjoint simple closed curves in a compact orientable surface which decompose the surface into pairs of pants. The isotopy classes of such curve systems form the vertices of a 2-complex, whose edges correspond to certain simple moves in which only one curve changes, and whose 2-cells correspond to certain elementary cycles of simple moves. The main theorem is that this 2-complex is simply-connected. Thus any two pants decompositions of a surface are joinable by a sequence of simple moves, and any two such sequences of simple move are related by the elementary relations. The proof is similar to the proof, in a 1980 paper with W. Thurston, of an analogous result for curve systems with connected genus zero complement. [The present paper is essentially an excerpt from a joint paper with P. Lochak and L. Schneps which is to appear in Crelle's Journal.]
Bianchi Orbifolds of Small Discriminant
Allen Hatcher
Mathematics , 1999,
Abstract: This brief report (6 pages) was written in 1983 but never published. It concerns the hyperbolic 3-orbifolds obtained as quotients of hyperbolic 3-space by the group of invertible 2 by 2 matrices whose entries are integers in the imaginary quadratic extension of Q of discriminant D. For values D > -100 the topological type of this orbifold is tabulated, and in the cases when the topological type is a punctured 3-sphere, the singular locus of the orbifold is drawn. A few miscellaneous comments about these orbifolds are included. The tables and pictures are based on Bob Riley's computer calculations of Ford domains and face pairings. Nothing is said about later developments after 1983. The pictures are also viewable on my webpage in a perhaps more convenient format; see http://math.cornell.edu/~hatcher
Spaces of Knots
Allen Hatcher
Mathematics , 1999,
Abstract: We consider the space of all smooth knots in the 3-sphere isotopic to a given knot, with the aim of finding a small subspace onto which this large space deformation retracts. For torus knots and many hyperbolic knots we show the subspace can be taken to be the orbit of a single maximally symmetric placement of the knot under the action of SO(4) by rotations of the ambient 3-sphere. This would hold for all hyperbolic knots if it were known that there are no exotic free actions of a finite cyclic group on the 3-sphere. For satellite knots the situation is more complicated but still describable in fairly simple terms. (This preliminary version of the paper does not include details for the case of satellite knots.)
Shifting Private Timberland Ownership in South Carolina: Implications for Management Intensity  [PDF]
John E. Hatcher Jr. Hatcher Jr., Thomas J. Straka, Richard A. Harper, Tim O. Adams
Open Journal of Forestry (OJF) , 2012, DOI: 10.4236/ojf.2012.24035
Abstract: Beginning in the late 1970’s forest industry timberland gained the eye of financial investors. Diamond International and Crown Zellerbach were early firms that were purchased for the “break-up value” of their timberland. Timberland was perceived as undervalued by investors and made forest industry firms attractive takeover targets. This started a process where forest industry divested of its timberland. Some firms formed separate entities for its timberland base. Acquisitions and mergers became popular in the industry. Some forest industry companies converted to real estate investment trusts, for tax and defensive reasons. Large institutional investors became interested in timberland as means to diversify their portfolios and increase financial performance. Timber management investment organizations developed to manage and procure timberland for these institutional investors. Today little of the forest industry timberland remains with vertically-integrated forest products companies. South Carolina’s forest industry timberland decreased by about 800,000 ha since 1993 (or nearly 90%). This has implications for the state’s timber supply. Forest industry timberlands were some of the most productive and intensively managed forests in the state. We address how forest management might change on this timberland and how long-term timber supply might be impacted in the state.
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