oalib

Publish in OALib Journal

ISSN: 2333-9721

APC: Only $99

Submit

Any time

2019 ( 34 )

2018 ( 29 )

2017 ( 28 )

2016 ( 40 )

Custom range...

Search Results: 1 - 10 of 10029 matches for " Simon Gebretsadik "
All listed articles are free for downloading (OA Articles)
Page 1 /10029
Display every page Item
Proteomics and Its Applications in Diagnosis of Auto Immune Diseases  [PDF]
Gebrehiwot Gebretsadik, M. K. C. Menon
Open Journal of Immunology (OJI) , 2016, DOI: 10.4236/oji.2016.61003
Abstract: Although the proteomics and its applications in detecting autoimmune diseases are a prominently discussed issue, this review will focus particularly some prominent aspects regarding clinical utility of these techniques in prognosis, diagnosis, and treatment of these diseases. The impact of immunofluorescent techniques, enzyme immunoassays and use of proteomics biomarkers in the characterization of the auto immune diseases is briefly discussed. The necessity of adopting existing technologies of protein chemistry, predisposition testing, targeted monitoring and prevention of diseases through nutrition coupled with lifestyle changes will be focused as modern diagnostic tools in realizing the changeover from isolated medicine to personalized medicine. Use of biological fluids, in order to identify low abundance proteins as biomarkers in detecting autoimmune diseases is attempted in the study of serum/plasma proteomics.
Soil transmitted helminths and schistosoma mansoni infections among school children in zarima town, northwest Ethiopia
Abebe Alemu, Asmamaw Atnafu, Zelalem Addis, Yitayal Shiferaw, Takele Teklu, Biniam Mathewos, Wubet Birhan, Simon Gebretsadik, Baye Gelaw
BMC Infectious Diseases , 2011, DOI: 10.1186/1471-2334-11-189
Abstract: Cross-sectional study was conducted among 319 school children of Zarima town from April 1 to May 25, 2009. A pre-tested structured questionnaire was used to collect socio-demographic data and possible risk factors exposure. Early morning stool samples were collected and a Kato Katz semi concentration technique was used to examine and count parasitic load by compound light microscope. Data entry and analysis was done using SPSS-15 version and p-value < 0.05 considered statistically significant.Out of 319 study subjects, 263 (82.4%) of the study participants infected with one or more parasites. From soil transmitted helminths, Ascaris lumbricoides was the predominant isolate (22%) followed by Hookworms (19%) and Trichuris trichiura (2.5%). Schistosoma mansoni was also isolated in 37.9% of the study participants. Hookworm and S. mansoni infections showed statistically significant associations with shoe wearing and swimming habit of school children, respectively.Prevalence of soil transmitted helminths (STH) and S.mansoni was high and the diseases were still major health problem in the study area which alerts public health intervention as soon as possible.Soil transmitted helminthic infections and Schistosomiasis are among the widely spread chronic infections in the world. Globally 2 billion individuals are infected with helminths, out of these majorities live in resource-poor settings [1,2]. World health organization (WHO) estimated the common STHIs in world as: 250 million cases for Ascariasis, 151 million cases of hookworm diseases, 100 million cases of Strongyloidiasis and 45.5 million cases of Trichuriasis [3]. Schistosomiasis is also remains one of the most prevalent parasitic diseases in the world. It is endemic in 76 countries and continues to be public health concern in developing countries. Approximately 80% of the 200 million people infected world-wide live in sub-Saharan Africa where Schistosoma mansoni and Schistosoma haematobium are widespread [4,5].The oc
The Non-Enzymatic Antioxidant and Level of Oxidative Stress of Tuberculosis Patients in Selected Treatment Center in Addis Ababa Ethiopia  [PDF]
Gebrehiwot Gebretsadik, Daniel Seifu, Getnet Yimer, M. K. C. Menon
Journal of Tuberculosis Research (JTR) , 2015, DOI: 10.4236/jtr.2015.33010
Abstract: Introduction: Non-enzymatic antioxidants are good scavengers of free radicals preventing their overproduction there by reducing the level of oxidative stress. This work was undertaken at Saint Peter TB specialized hospital and TekleHaimanot health center from March 2012 to May 2013.Aim: To determine changes in Non-Enzymatic Antioxidants and level of oxidative stress of tuberculosis Patients before and after taking anti tuberculosis treatment.Materials and Methods: In this comparative cross sectional study, a total of 210 individuals including: newly diagnosed TB patients as group-I (n = 70), TB patients who completed treatment as group-II (n = 70), and healthy volunteers as group-III (n = 70) were enrolled. Different methods were used to determine the parameters; vit-C (HPLC method), lipid peroxidation (thiobarbuituric acid method), and bilirubin (Colorimetric assay). Results: Vitamin-C (Vit-C) and of group-I showed a significant reduction (p < 0.001) as compared with both group-II and group-III whereas Malondialdehyde (MDA) level was increased. However, the total and direct bilirubin was not different among the groups. In group-III, there was a positive correlation between BMI and serum Vit-C (r = -0.305, p = 0.010). Vit-C showed a negative correlation with serum MDA in all the groups with values (r = -0.265, p = 0.027), (r = -0.389, p = 0.001) and (r = -0.375, p = 0.001) for group-I, group-II and group-III respectively. In addition to this Vit-C was negatively correlated with serum UA (r = -0.285, p = 0.017) in group-I. Conclusion: The findings of the current study suggest that the amount of Vit-C in the newly diagnosed TB patients and those who finished their treatment is much lower than the healthy volunteers. In contrast to this, the MDA value was significantly higher both in the newly diagnosed TB patients and TB patients who completed treatment than in healthy volunteers suggesting higher degree of oxidative stress.
Synthesis, Spectroscopic, Structural Characterization, Conductivity and Electrochemical Studies of a Schiff Base Ligand and Its Copper Complexes  [PDF]
Atinafu Abayneh, Tesfay Gebretsadik, Sisay Tadesse, Madhu Thomas
Advances in Chemical Engineering and Science (ACES) , 2018, DOI: 10.4236/aces.2018.84017
Abstract: Schiff base ligand (L) derived from glyoxal and 4-aminoantipyrine was synthesized. The ligand (L) has been characterized by IR, NMR, electronic spectral studies and electrochemical studies. Cu(II) complexes of a Schiff base ligand (L) from 4-aminoantpyrine and glyoxal having the composition [CuL1]X2 where X = Cl¯?or NO3¯ have been prepared and characterized by elemental analysis, electrical conductivity in non-aqueous solvent, infrared and electronic, as well as cyclic voltammetric studies. L acts as a neutral tetradentate ligand coordinating through both the carbonyl oxygen and azomethine nitrogen. On both the complexes both the anions are not coordinated. A square planar geometry is assigned for complexes. The electrochemical studies of ligand show a typical cyclic voltammogram for an irreversible process. While copper(II) complexes show the typical cyclic voltammograms for quasi reversible process.
Kinetics on Thermal Decomposition of Iron(III) Complexes of 1,2-Bis(Imino-4’-Antipyrinyl)Ethane with Varying Counter Anions  [PDF]
Fikre Elemo, Tesfay Gebretsadik, Mamo Gebrezgiabher, Yosef Bayeh, Madhu Thomas
Advances in Chemical Engineering and Science (ACES) , 2019, DOI: 10.4236/aces.2019.91001
Abstract: A comparative thermal decomposition kinetic investigation on Fe(III) complexes of a antipyrine Schiff base ligand, 1,2-Bis(imino-4-antipyrinyl)ethane (GA)), with varying counter anions viz. CIO4-, NO3-, SCN-, Cl-, and Br-, has been done by thermogravimetric analysis by using Coats-Redfern equation. The kinetic parameters like activation energy (E), pre-exponential factor (A) and entropy of activation (ΔS) were quantified. On comparing the various kinetic parameters, lower activation energy was observed in second stage as compared to first thermal decomposition stage. The same trend has been observed for pre-exponential factor (A) and entropy of activation (ΔS). The present results show that the starting materials having higher activation energy (E), are more stable than the intermediate products, however; the intermediate products possess well-ordered chemical structure due to their highly negative entropy of activation (ΔS) values. The present investigation proves that the counter anions play an important role on the thermal decomposition kinetics of the complexes.
Nutritional status, intestinal parasite infection and allergy among school children in Northwest Ethiopia
Bemnet Amare, Jemal Ali, Beyene Moges, Gizachew Yismaw, Yeshambel Belyhun, Simon Gebretsadik, Desalegn Woldeyohannes, Ketema Tafess, Ebba Abate, Mengistu Endris, Desalegn Tegabu, Andargachew Mulu, Fusao Ota, Bereket Fantahun, Afework Kassu
BMC Pediatrics , 2013, DOI: 10.1186/1471-2431-13-7
Abstract: A cross sectional study was performed involving school children in two elementary schools in Gondar, Ethiopia. Nutritional status of these children was determined using anthropometric parameters (weight-for-age, height-for-age and BMI-for-age). Epi-Info software was used to calculate z-scores. Stool samples were examined using standard parasitological procedures. The serum IgE levels were quantified by total IgE ELISA kit following the manufacturer’s instruction.A total of 405 children (with mean age of 12.09.1?±?2.54 years) completed a self-administered allergy questionnaire and provided stool samples for analysis. Overall prevalence of underweight, stunting and thinness/wasting was 15.1%, 25.2%, 8.9%, respectively. Of the total, 22.7% were found to be positive for intestinal parasites. The most prevalent intestinal parasite detected was Ascaris lumbricoides (31/405, 7.6%). There was no statistically significant association between prevalence of malnutrition and the prevalence of parasitic infections. Median total serum IgE level was 344 IU/ml (IQR 117–2076, n?=?80) and 610 IU/ml (143–1833, n?=?20), respectively, in children without and with intestinal parasite infection (Z?=??0.198, P?>?0.8). The prevalence of self reported allergy among the subset was 8%. IgE concentration was not associated either with the presence of parasitic infection or history of allergy.The prevalence of malnutrition, intestinal parasitism and allergy was not negligible in this population. In addition, there was no significant association between the prevalence of allergy and their nutritional status, and parasite infection. Further research prospective observational and intervention studies are required to address the question of causality between nutritional factors, parasites, and allergy.According to the World Health Organization (WHO), approximately 2 billion people are affected by helminthic infection worldwide [1]. These infections are responsible for high levels of morbidity and mo
Intestinal parasitosis and shigellosis among diarrheal patients in Gondar teaching hospital, northwest Ethiopia
Kahsay Huruy, Afework Kassu, Andargachew Mulu, Netsanet Worku, Teshome Fetene, Simon Gebretsadik, Fantahun Biadglegne, Yeshambel Belyhun, Abebe Muche, Aschalew Gelaw, Belay Anagaw, Sisay Yifru, Yemataw Wondie, Assegedech Bekele, Moges Tiruneh, Dieter Reissig, Feleke Moges
BMC Research Notes , 2011, DOI: 10.1186/1756-0500-4-472
Abstract: A cross-sectional study involving 384 consecutive diarrheal patients who visited Gondar teaching hospital, Gondar, Ethiopia from October 2006 to March 2007 was conducted. Stool specimens were collected and examined for intestinal parasites and enteropathogenic bacteria following standard parasitological and microbiological procedures.Intestinal parasites were diagnosed in 36.5% of the patients. The most frequently encountered protozoan parasite was Entamoeba histolytica/dispar (7.3%) followed by Giardia lamblia (5.0%), Cryptosporidium parvum (1.8%) and Isospora belli (1.3%). The dominant helminthic parasite identified was Ascaris lumbricoides (5.5%) followed by Strongyloides stercoralis and Schistosoma mansoni (3.1% each), hookworm infection (1.8%), and Hymenolepis species (1.3%). Multiple infections of intestinal parasites were also observed in 6.3% of the patients. Among the enteropathogenic bacteria Shigella and Salmonella species were isolated from 15.6% and 1.6%, respectively, of the patients. Escherichia coli O57:H7 was not found in any of the stool samples tested. Eighty eight percent and 83.3% of the Shigella and Salmonella isolates were resistant to one or more commonly used antibiotics, respectively.Intestinal parasitosis was higher in patients who live in rural area, in patients who were washing their hands after visiting toilet either irregularly with soap and without soap or not at all, in patients who used well and spring water for household consumption, and in patients who had nausea (P < 0.05). Statistically significant associations were also observed between Shigella infections and patients who were using well and spring water for household consumption, and patients who had dysentery and mucoid stool (P < 0.05).The high prevalence of intestinal parasites and Shigella species in diarrheic patients calls for institution of appropriate public health intervention measures to reduce morbidity and mortality associated with these diseases. The rational use
Levels of metals in commercially available Ethiopian black teas and their infusions
Daniel Woldegebriel Gebretsadik, Bhagwan Singh Chandravanshi
Bulletin of the Chemical Society of Ethiopia , 2010,
Abstract: K, Ca, Mg, Mn, Fe, Zn, Cu, Co, Cd and Pb contents of commercially available Ethiopian black tea (Wushwush, Gumero, and Black Lion) and their infusions were analyzed by flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS). In black tea leaves the order of metal content was found to be: K (11503–13780 mg/kg) > Ca (3821–4419 mg/kg) > Mg (3219–3538 mg/kg) > Mn (1242–1421 mg/kg) > Fe (319–467 mg/kg) > Zn (20.2–21.6 mg/kg) > Cu (9.1–11.5 mg/kg). Co, Cd and Pb were too low to be detected by the method (FAAS). In tea infusion, prepared in a laboratory condition following Ethiopian tea making procedures, the range of metal contents was found as follows: K (110–124 mg/L) > Mg (14.5–16.3 mg/L) > Ca (10.0–10.7 mg/L) > Mn (8.5–13.4 mg/L) > Fe (0.98–1.56 mg/L) > Zn (0.098–0.100 mg/L) > Cu (0.038–0.063 mg/L). The metal contents of the black tea leaves were higher than those of tea infusions. The extraction was highest for K (47.1%) and lowest for Ca (12.5%). KEY WORDS: Tea (Camellia sinensis), Black tea, Tea infusion, Heavy metals, Flame atomic absorption spectrophotometer (FAAS) Bull. Chem. Soc. Ethiop. 2010, 24(3), 339-349.
Tillage Frequency, Soil Compaction and N-Fertilizer Rate Effects on Yield of Teff (Eragrostis Tef (Zucc) Trotter) in Central Zone of Tigray, Northern Ethiopia
H Gebretsadik, M Haile, CF Yamoah
Momona Ethiopian Journal of Science , 2009,
Abstract: In Ethiopia, teff is grown for its grain and straw. There is a dearth of information with respect to plowing, compaction and fertilization on vertisols in central zone of Tigray. Therefore, this study was conducted to determine the effects of plowing frequency, soil compaction and N on teff yields. The experimental design was a split-split plot where main plot was plowing frequency with three levels (once, twice and thrice); sub-plot was compaction with two levels (with and without compaction) and sub-sub plot was N-fertilizer rate with four levels (0kg N/ha, 46Kg N/ha, 69Kg N/ha and 92Kg N/ha). There were three replications. Results showed that plowing frequency had no significant effect on most of the yield components except on tillering when the soil is compacted. Maximum average number of tillers per plant (2.75) was obtained from compacted plots plowed two times. Compaction affected almost all yield and yield components significantly. Higher number of tillers per plant (2.64) from non compacted plots and higher stand cover (about 94%) from compacted plots were found. In addition, maximum biomass (4210.617 kg/ha) and grain (1221.98 kg/ha) yields were obtained from compacted plots due to enhanced soil to seed contact resulting in increased plant population. Nitrogen fertilizer significantly increased grain yield and yield components. Maximum stand cover (94.78%), plant height (92.16cm), panicle length (37.75cm), biomass yield (4724 kg/ha) and grain yield (1387.9 kg/ha) were found from plots receiving 92kgN/ha. Partial budget analysis of N fertilizer rates indicted that higher marginal rate of return (525%) were found by applying 69kg N/ha. It is recommended that farmers use 69kg N/ha so as to get economically feasible returns and yield.
Levels of metals in commercially available Ethiopian black teas and their infusions
Daniel Woldegebriel Gebretsadik,Bhagwan Singh Chandravanshi
Bulletin of the Chemical Society of Ethiopia , 2010,
Abstract: K, Ca, Mg, Mn, Fe, Zn, Cu, Co, Cd and Pb contents of commercially available Ethiopian black tea (Wushwush, Gumero, and Black Lion) and their infusions were analyzed by flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS). In black tea leaves the order of metal content was found to be: K (11503–13780 mg/kg) > Ca (3821–4419 mg/kg) > Mg (3219–3538 mg/kg) > Mn (1242–1421 mg/kg) > Fe (319–467 mg/kg) > Zn (20.2–21.6 mg/kg) > Cu (9.1–11.5 mg/kg). Co, Cd and Pb were too low to be detected by the method (FAAS). In tea infusion, prepared in a laboratory condition following Ethiopian tea making procedures, the range of metal contents was found as follows: K (110–124 mg/L) > Mg (14.5–16.3 mg/L) > Ca (10.0–10.7 mg/L) > Mn (8.5–13.4 mg/L) > Fe (0.98–1.56 mg/L) > Zn (0.098–0.100 mg/L) > Cu (0.038–0.063 mg/L). The metal contents of the black tea leaves were higher than those of tea infusions. The extraction was highest for K (47.1%) and lowest for Ca (12.5%).
Page 1 /10029
Display every page Item


Home
Copyright © 2008-2017 Open Access Library. All rights reserved.