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Search Results: 1 - 10 of 7559 matches for " Siew-Pang Chan "
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High-sensitivity C-reactive protein concentrations among patients with and without diabetes in a multiethnic population of Singapore: CREDENCE Study
Rinkoo Dalan, Michelle Jong, Siew-Pang Chan, et al
Diabetes, Metabolic Syndrome and Obesity: Targets and Therapy , 2010, DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/DMSO.S10721
Abstract: h-sensitivity C-reactive protein concentrations among patients with and without diabetes in a multiethnic population of Singapore: CREDENCE Study Original Research (4232) Total Article Views Authors: Rinkoo Dalan, Michelle Jong, Siew-Pang Chan, et al Published Date June 2010 Volume 2010:3 Pages 187 - 195 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/DMSO.S10721 Rinkoo Dalan1, Michelle Jong1, Siew-Pang Chan4,5, Robert Hawkins2, Robin Choo6, Brenda Lim1, May L Tan3, Melvin KS Leow1,6 1Department of Endocrinology, 2Department of Laboratory Medicine, 3Health Enrichment Centre, Tan Tock Seng Hospital, Singapore; 4School of Business, SIM University, Singapore; 5Faculty of Health Sciences, La Trobe University, Australia; 6Singapore Institute for Clinical Sciences, Brenner Centre for Molecular Medicine, Singapore Objectives: To determine whether high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) concentrations differ between Chinese, Malays, and Indians with and without type 2 diabetes mellitus and to look for an association with demographic, metabolic and therapeutic variables. Methods: Phase 1: We retrieved records of 50 Chinese, 51 Malay, and 67 Indian individuals who had routine health screening blood tests. Phase 2: We recruited 111 Chinese, 68 Malays, and 67 Indians with type 2 diabetes mellitus and measured their hs-CRP in addition to standard laboratory tests. Results: Phase 1: The median hs-CRP was 0.6 mg/L (0.2–6.2) in Chinese, 1.2 mg/L (0.2–7.9) in Malays, and 1.9 mg/L (0.2–10.0) in Indians. The Indians had higher hs-CRP compared to Chinese (P < 0.05) when adjusted for age, sex, body mass index (BMI), lipids, blood pressure, and smoking, and a significant correlation was seen between female sex, smoking status, fasting glucose and triglyceride concentration, and hs-CRP in all three ethnicities. Phase 2: The median hs-CRP was 1.2 mg/L (0.2–9.9) in Chinese, 2.2 mg/L (0.2–9.0) in Malays, and 2.3 mg/L (0.2–9.8) in Indians. Indians had higher hs-CRP when compared to Chinese (P < 0.05) and a significant correlation was seen between BMI, female gender, diabetes, and the use of metformin and hs-CRP in all three ethnicities (P < 0.05) when adjusted for the above variables and use of aspirin, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor/angiotensin receptor blockers (ACE-I/ARB), statin, metformin, rosiglitazone, sulfonylurea, glinides, acarbose, and insulin. Conclusion: hs-CRP concentrations are significantly higher in Indians compared to the Chinese (in both the diabetic and nondiabetic individuals) after adjustment for the various demographic, metabolic, and therapeutic variables.
A Bayesian Review of the Meta-Analysis on the Efficacy of Bone Marrow-Derived Cells Transplantation in Adult Patients with Heart Diseases
Siew-Pang Chan,Rosalind Lee,Kim-Leng Poh
Lecture Notes in Engineering and Computer Science , 2009,
Abstract:
High-sensitivity C-reactive protein concentrations among patients with and without diabetes in a multiethnic population of Singapore: CREDENCE Study
Rinkoo Dalan,Michelle Jong,Siew-Pang Chan,et al
Diabetes, Metabolic Syndrome and Obesity: Targets and Therapy , 2010,
Abstract: Rinkoo Dalan1, Michelle Jong1, Siew-Pang Chan4,5, Robert Hawkins2, Robin Choo6, Brenda Lim1, May L Tan3, Melvin KS Leow1,61Department of Endocrinology, 2Department of Laboratory Medicine, 3Health Enrichment Centre, Tan Tock Seng Hospital, Singapore; 4School of Business, SIM University, Singapore; 5Faculty of Health Sciences, La Trobe University, Australia; 6Singapore Institute for Clinical Sciences, Brenner Centre for Molecular Medicine, SingaporeObjectives: To determine whether high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) concentrations differ between Chinese, Malays, and Indians with and without type 2 diabetes mellitus and to look for an association with demographic, metabolic and therapeutic variables.Methods: Phase 1: We retrieved records of 50 Chinese, 51 Malay, and 67 Indian individuals who had routine health screening blood tests. Phase 2: We recruited 111 Chinese, 68 Malays, and 67 Indians with type 2 diabetes mellitus and measured their hs-CRP in addition to standard laboratory tests.Results: Phase 1: The median hs-CRP was 0.6 mg/L (0.2–6.2) in Chinese, 1.2 mg/L (0.2–7.9) in Malays, and 1.9 mg/L (0.2–10.0) in Indians. The Indians had higher hs-CRP compared to Chinese (P < 0.05) when adjusted for age, sex, body mass index (BMI), lipids, blood pressure, and smoking, and a significant correlation was seen between female sex, smoking status, fasting glucose and triglyceride concentration, and hs-CRP in all three ethnicities. Phase 2: The median hs-CRP was 1.2 mg/L (0.2–9.9) in Chinese, 2.2 mg/L (0.2–9.0) in Malays, and 2.3 mg/L (0.2–9.8) in Indians. Indians had higher hs-CRP when compared to Chinese (P < 0.05) and a significant correlation was seen between BMI, female gender, diabetes, and the use of metformin and hs-CRP in all three ethnicities (P < 0.05) when adjusted for the above variables and use of aspirin, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor/angiotensin receptor blockers (ACE-I/ARB), statin, metformin, rosiglitazone, sulfonylurea, glinides, acarbose, and insulin.Conclusion: hs-CRP concentrations are significantly higher in Indians compared to the Chinese (in both the diabetic and nondiabetic individuals) after adjustment for the various demographic, metabolic, and therapeutic variables.Keywords: C-reactive protein, ethnicity, diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular disease
Self-Reported Pain Intensity with the Numeric Reporting Scale in Adult Dengue
Joshua G. X. Wong, Victor C. Gan, Ee-Ling Ng, Yee-Sin Leo, Siew-Pang Chan, Robin Choo, David C. Lye
PLOS ONE , 2014, DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0096514
Abstract: Background Pain is a prominent feature of acute dengue as well as a clinical criterion in World Health Organization guidelines in diagnosing dengue. We conducted a prospective cohort study to compare levels of pain during acute dengue between different ethnicities and dengue severity. Methods Demographic, clinical and laboratory data were collected. Data on self-reported pain was collected using the 11-point Numerical Rating Scale. Generalized structural equation models were built to predict progression to severe disease. Results A total of 499 laboratory confirmed dengue patients were recruited in the Prospective Adult Dengue Study at Tan Tock Seng Hospital, Singapore. We found no statistically significant differences between pain score with age, gender, ethnicity or the presence of co-morbidity. Pain score was not predictive of dengue severity but highly correlated to patients’ day of illness. Prevalence of abdominal pain in our cohort was 19%. There was no difference in abdominal pain score between grades of dengue severity. Conclusion Dengue is a painful disease. Patients suffer more pain at the earlier phase of illness. However, pain score cannot be used to predict a patient’s progression to severe disease.
Influenza Excess Mortality from 1950–2000 in Tropical Singapore
Vernon J. Lee,Jonathan Yap,Jimmy B. S. Ong,Kwai-Peng Chan,Raymond T. P. Lin,Siew Pang Chan,Kee Tai Goh,Yee-Sin Leo,Mark I-Cheng Chen
PLOS ONE , 2012, DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0008096
Abstract: Tropical regions have been shown to exhibit different influenza seasonal patterns compared to their temperate counterparts. However, there is little information about the burden of annual tropical influenza epidemics across time, and the relationship between tropical influenza epidemics compared with other regions.
Null association between ACE gene I/D polymorphism and diabetic nephropathy among multiethnic Malaysian subjects
Jayapalan Jaime,Muniandy Sekaran,Chan Siew
Indian Journal of Human Genetics , 2010,
Abstract: Background: Wide inter-ethnic allelic variations of the Angiotensin Converting Enzyme (ACE) i nsertion-deletion (I/D) gene polymorphism were thought to be responsible for the conflicting gene-diabetic nephropathy disease association worldwide. We have investigated the genetic susceptibility of the ACE gene to diabetic nephropathy in the multiethnic Malaysian population. Materials and Methods: A total of 137 healthy (control) and 256 diabetic subjects were recruited. The diabetic subjects were further subdivided according to their nephropathy status based on urinary albumin-creatinine ratio (ACR) and glomerular filtration rate (GFR). Triple primer polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was used for ACE I/D genotyping. Subsequently, populationwide genetic analysis and gene-disease association studies were performed. Results: The genotype frequencies in all subgroups were in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. Similar allelic and genotypic frequency of ACE I/D gene polymorphism was observed between healthy controls versus pooled type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) subjects, and normoalbuminuria versus microalbuminuria, macroalbuminuria and End Stage Renal Failure (ESRF) (P > 0.05). Neither ethnicity nor gender exerted any influence on the ACE I/D gene polymorphism (P > 0.05), with the exception of the Chinese ethnic group which exhibited a higher frequency of ID genotype (P = 0.042). A multinomial logistic regression model showed that predictive factors including age, systolic blood pressure (SBP), high density lipoprotein (HDL) and glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1C) were independently associated with diabetic nephropathy, in that order. Conclusion: The I/D polymorphism of the ACE gene is not significantly associated with both T2DM and/or diabetic nephropathy in this Malaysian population regardless of ethnicity and gender.
Validation of the diabetes, hypertension and hyperlipidemia (DHL) knowledge instrument in Malaysia
Pauline SM Lai, Siew Siang Chua, Ching Hooi Tan, Siew Pheng Chan
BMC Medical Research Methodology , 2012, DOI: 10.1186/1471-2288-12-18
Abstract: A 28-item instrument which comprised of 5 domains: diabetes, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, medications and general issues was designed and tested. One point was given for every correct answer, whilst zero was given for incorrect answers. Scores ranged from 0 to 28, which were then converted into percentage. This was administered to 77 patients with type 2 diabetes in a tertiary hospital, who were on medication(s) for diabetes and who could understand English (patient group), and to 40 pharmacists (professional group). The DHL knowledge instrument was administered again to the patient group after one month. Excluded were patients less than 18 years old.Flesch reading ease was 60, which is satisfactory, while the mean difficulty factor(SD) was 0.74(0.21), indicating that DHL knowledge instrument was moderately easy. Internal consistency of the instrument was good, with Cronbach's α = 0.791. The test-retest scores showed no significant difference for 26 out of the 28 items, indicating that the questionnaire has achieved stable reliability. The overall mean(SD) knowledge scores was significantly different between the patient and professional groups [74.35(14.88) versus 93.84(6.47), p < 0.001]. This means that the DHL knowledge instrument could differentiate the knowledge levels of participants. The DHL knowledge instrument shows similar psychometric properties as other validated questionnaires.The DHL knowledge instrument shows good promise to be adopted as an instrument for assessing diabetic patients' knowledge concerning their disease conditions and medications in Malaysia.Diabetes and its complications pose a major health-care burden worldwide and present major challenges to patients, health-care systems, and national economies. The World Health Organization estimates that between 2000 and 2030, the world population will increase by 37% and the number of people with diabetes will increase by 114% [1]. Asia will be the major site of a rapidly emerging diabetes epidem
An Asian viewpoint on the use of vitamin D and calcium in osteoporosis treatment: Physician and patient attitudes and beliefs
Siew Chan, Boyd B Scott, Shuvayu S Sen
BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders , 2010, DOI: 10.1186/1471-2474-11-248
Abstract: Physicians selected from Malaysia, Taiwan, Philippines, Korea and Singapore were asked to grade the significance of vitamin D and calcium in the treatment of osteoporosis and their patients' use of these supplements. In addition, physicians recruited seven eligible osteoporotic women to answer a questionnaire to determine their use of vitamin D and calcium, and their attitudes and beliefs regarding these supplements.In total, 237 physicians and 1463 osteoporosis patients completed the questionnaire. The results revealed that 22% of physicians in Malaysia, 12% in Taiwan, 72% in the Philippines, 50% in Korea and 24% in Singapore rated the importance of vitamin D supplementation as being extremely important. For calcium, 27% of physicians in Malaysia, 30% in Taiwan, 80% in the Philippines, 50% in Korea and 38% in Singapore rated the importance as being extremely important. Forty-three percent of patients in Malaysia, 38% in Taiwan, 73% in the Philippines, 35% in Korea and 39% in Singapore rated the importance of vitamin D as being extremely important. For calcium, 69% of patients in Malaysia, 58% in Taiwan, 90% in the Philippines, 70% in Korea and 55% in Singapore rated the importance as being extremely important. In addition, results of the patient questionnaire revealed that only a very small number regularly took both supplements. In addition, the results indicated that, with the exception of patients from the Philippines, the majority of patients had no or infrequent discussion with their physician about vitamin D and calcium.There is generally suboptimal appreciation by both physicians and patients of the importance of vitamin D and calcium for maintenance of bone health as reflected in the low number of patients who reported regularly taking these supplements. Recognition of this problem should translate to appropriate action to improve education for both physicians and patients, with a goal to increase use of these supplements among Asian patients with osteoporo
Improving Indel Detection Specificity of the Ion Torrent PGM Benchtop Sequencer
Zhen Xuan Yeo, Maurice Chan, Yoon Sim Yap, Peter Ang, Steve Rozen, Ann Siew Gek Lee
PLOS ONE , 2012, DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0045798
Abstract: The emergence of benchtop sequencers has made clinical genetic testing using next-generation sequencing more feasible. Ion Torrent's PGMTM is one such benchtop sequencer that shows clinical promise in detecting single nucleotide variations (SNVs) and microindel variations (indels). However, the large number of false positive indels caused by the high frequency of homopolymer sequencing errors has impeded PGMTM's usage for clinical genetic testing. An extensive analysis of PGMTM data from the sequencing reads of the well-characterized genome of the Escherichia coli DH10B strain and sequences of the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes from six germline samples was done. Three commonly used variant detection tools, SAMtools, Dindel, and GATK's Unified Genotyper, all had substantial false positive rates for indels. By incorporating filters on two major measures we could dramatically improve false positive rates without sacrificing sensitivity. The two measures were: B-Allele Frequency (BAF) and VARiation of the Width of gaps and inserts (VARW) per indel position. A BAF threshold applied to indels detected by UnifiedGenotyper removed ~99% of the indel errors detected in both the DH10B and BRCA sequences. The optimum BAF threshold for BRCA sequences was determined by requiring 100% detection sensitivity and minimum false discovery rate, using variants detected from Sanger sequencing as reference. This resulted in 15 indel errors remaining, of which 7 indel errors were removed by selecting a VARW threshold of zero. VARW specific errors increased in frequency with higher read depth in the BRCA datasets, suggesting that homopolymer-associated indel errors cannot be reduced by increasing the depth of coverage. Thus, using a VARW threshold is likely to be important in reducing indel errors from data with higher coverage. In conclusion, BAF and VARW thresholds provide simple and effective filtering criteria that can improve the specificity of indel detection in PGMTM data without compromising sensitivity.
Current Advances in the Carbon Nanotube/Thermotropic Main-Chain Liquid Crystalline Polymer Nanocomposites and Their Blends
Henry Kuo Feng Cheng,Tanya Basu,Nanda Gopal Sahoo,Lin Li,Siew Hwa Chan
Polymers , 2012, DOI: 10.3390/polym4020889
Abstract: Because of their extraordinary properties, such as high thermal stability, flame retardant, high chemical resistance and high mechanical strength, thermotropic liquid crystalline polymers (TLCPs) have recently gained more attention while being useful for many applications which require chemical inertness and high strength. Due to the recent advance in nanotechnology, TLCPs are usually compounded with nanoparticles to form particulate composites to enhance their properties, such as barrier properties, electrical properties, mechanical properties and thermal properties. Carbon-based nanofillers such as carbon nanotube (CNT), graphene and graphene oxide are the most common fillers used for the TLCP matrices. In this review, we focus on recent advances in thermotropic main-chain liquid crystalline polymer nanocomposites incorporated with CNTs. However, the biggest challenges in the preparation of CNT/TLCP nanocomposites have been shown to be inherent in the dispersion of CNTs into the TLCP matrix, the alignment and control of CNTs in the TLCP matrix and the load-transfer between the TLCP matrix and CNTs. As a result, this paper reviews recent advances in CNT/TLCP nanocomposites through enhanced dispersion of CNTs in TLCPs as well as their improved interfacial adhesion with the TLCP matrices. Case studies on the important role of chemically modified CNTs in the TLCP/thermoplastic polymer blends are also included.
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