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Search Results: 1 - 10 of 3736 matches for " Shandra Nicole Frey "
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Effects of vegetation differences in relocated Utah prairie dog release sites  [PDF]
Rachel Curtis, Shandra Nicole Frey
Natural Science (NS) , 2013, DOI: 10.4236/ns.2013.55A006
Abstract:

Utah prairie dogs have been extirpated in 90% of their historical range. Because most of the population occurs on private land, this threatened species is continually in conflict with land-owners due to burrowing. The Utah Division of Wildlife Resources has been relocating Utah prairie dogs from private to public land since the 1970s, but relocations have been largely unsuccessful due to high mortality. Utah prairie dogs were relocated in 2010 and 2011 from the golf course in Cedar City, Utah to two prepared sites near Bryce Canyon National Park, Utah. Vegetation transects were established at each site to determine if there was a correlation between site vegetation composition and structure, and Utah prairie dog survival at relocation sites. The vegetation at the two sites was significantly different. One site had significantly less grass cover, more invasive plant cover, and rockier soils. The sites also had different soil structures and long-term Utah prairie dog retention rates. Newly established burrows were clustered rather than randomly distributed. Utah prairie dogs appeared to avoid placing burrows in areas with tall vegetation and rocky soils. More research is needed to determine how site selection determines longterm retention and colonization of a relocation site.

Experimental comparison of relative RT-qPCR quantification approaches for gene expression studies in poplar
Nicole Regier, Beat Frey
BMC Molecular Biology , 2010, DOI: 10.1186/1471-2199-11-57
Abstract: We quantified gene expression of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and ascorbate peroxidase (APX) in the roots of two black poplar clones, 58-861 and Poli, which were subjected to drought stress. After proving the chosen reference genes actin (ACT), elongation factor 1 (EF1) and ubiquitin (UBQ) to be constantly expressed in the different watering regimes, we applied different approaches for relative quantification to the same raw fluorescence data. The results obtained using the comparative Cq method, LinRegPCR, qBase software and the Pfaffl model showed a good correlation, whereas calculation according to the Liu and Saint method produced highly variable results. However, it has been shown that the most reliable approach for calculation of the amplification efficiency is using the mean increase in fluorescence during PCR in each individual reaction. Accordingly, we could improve the quality of our results by applying the mean amplification efficiencies for each amplicon to the Liu and Saint method.As we could show that gene expression results can vary depending on the approach used for quantification, we recommend to carefully evaluate different quantification approaches before using them in studies analysing gene expression.RT-qPCR is a widely used method for analysing gene expression. It has been developed by combining PCR with fluorescent techniques [1,2]. It depends on collecting data throughout the PCR amplification, which is achieved by monitoring the increase in fluorescence intensity of a specific fluorescence dye, which correlates to the increase in PCR product concentration. The major progress of qPCR is that quantification does not have to be done in the plateau phase of amplification, which is a disadvantage of previous quantification methods [1].PCR can be divided into four major phases: linear ground phase, early exponential phase, log-linear phase and plateau phase [3]. During the linear ground phase, only background fluorescence is detected. The early expo
Update on the management of prostate cancer with goserelin acetate: patient perspectives
Shandra Wilson
Cancer Management and Research , 2009, DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/CMAR.S5058
Abstract: ate on the management of prostate cancer with goserelin acetate: patient perspectives Review (5000) Total Article Views Authors: Shandra Wilson Published Date August 2009 Volume 2009:1 Pages 99 - 105 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/CMAR.S5058 Shandra Wilson Division of Urology, University of Colorado, Aurora, CO, USA Abstract: The guidelines for the use of androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) have changed significantly over the last 5 years. This paper reviews the current recommendations and documents the reasons for these changes, in a review of the world’s literature on ADT over the last 5 years. Special emphasis on randomized controlled trials and high-impact journals was included in the Medline search and review. One hundred articles on this topic written in the last 5 years were reviewed. Fifty-nine contained nonindustry-biased findings in major-impact journals and were available in English. The benefits of ADT are evident in several areas, including neoadjuvantly and adjuvantly in patients treated with external beam radiation therapy for intermediate- and high-risk disease; in patients who have undergone prostatectomy and who are found to have lymph node involvement on surgical resection; in high-risk patients after definitive therapy; and in patients who have developed symptomatic local progression or metastasis. This paper reviews the risks and benefits in each of these scenarios and the risks of androgen deprivation in general, and delineates the areas where ADT was previously recommended, but has been found to no longer be of benefit.
Some in Saskatchewan Find The Cochrane Library Useful after Promotion, Access and Training Efforts. A review of: Forbes, Dorothy, Christine Neilson, Janet Bangma, Jennifer Forbes, Daniel Fuller, and Shari Furniss. “Saskatchewan Residents’ Use of The Cochrane Library.” Partnership: the Canadian Journal of Library and Information Practice and Research 2.2 (2007).
Shandra Protzko
Evidence Based Library and Information Practice , 2008,
Abstract: Objective – To evaluate the use of The Cochrane Library by librarians, health care providers and consumers in the Canadian province of Saskatchewan. Design – Volunteer telephone interviews and surveys of training participants at multiple time points; usage statistics. Setting – Saskatchewan. Subjects – Ninety-four volunteers participated in the study. Participants were self-selected from approximately 300 health practitioners and 100 public library staff attending training sessions, located primarily in rural areas. The majority of public library staff who attended training sessions were not professional librarians, although 31.5% of the study participants were librarians. Nurses made up the next largest group (16.3%), followed by therapists (7.6%), library support staff (5.4%),pharmacists (4.3%), physicians (3.3%), other health care providers (20.7%), and other (9.8%). Most were 40-65 years of age (71.6%)and female (92.4%). Methods – Forty-six training sessions were provided upon request between October 2004 and December 2006. Attendees wereinvited to participate in the study. Telephone interviews were conducted at three, six, nine, and twelve months following training sessions. Demographic information and data on the use of andsatisfaction with The Cochrane Library were collected. Additionally, monthly statistics were tracked by Wiley-Blackwell for user sessions, number of searches, and the number of full-text articles and abstracts visited. Main Results – Telephone interviews revealed that 65.2% of participants had accessed The Cochrane Library at three months; 64.2% had at six months. At nine months access dropped to 45.2%. At twelve months only 27.4% of participants reported using the resource. Of those who used The Cochrane Library, 16.4% reported at the three month interview that it was not helpful. This number decreased at six months (11.6%), nine months (7.7%) and twelve months (11.8%). 57.5% of respondents claimed to have learned something from The Cochrane Library, although a few (11.1%)reported that the information found had no impact. Others reported that the knowledge gained confirmed their beliefs (26.1%)and/or helped in decision-making (32.6%). No time points were reported for the data collected about the use and helpfulness of information found in The Cochrane Library. Three-year data from Wiley-Blackwell showed that The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews was most frequently accessed (abstracts=26,016; full texts=15,934). The Cochrane Central Register was accessed5,640 times and Database of s of Reviews of Effects was accessed 1,612
Web Usability Policies/Standards/Guidelines Do Not Influence Practices at ARL Academic Libraries. A Review of: Chen, Yu‐Hui, Carol Anne Germain and Huahai Yang. “An Exploration into the Practices of Library Web Usability in ARL Academic Libraries.” Journal of the American Society for Information Science and Technology 60.5 (2009): 953‐68.
Shandra Protzko
Evidence Based Library and Information Practice , 2009,
Abstract: Objective – To survey the current status of Web usability Policies/Standards/Guidelines (PSGs) found in academic libraries of the Association of Research Libraries (ARL). Researchers sought to investigate whether PSGs are in place, the levels of difficulty surrounding implementation, the impact of PSGs on design, testing, and resource allocation, and the relationship between ARL ranking and usability practice or PSGs. Design – Survey. Setting – North America. Subjects – Academic libraries of the ARL. Methods – An 18‐question survey consisting of multiple choice, Likert scale, and open‐ended questions was sent to all 113 ARL libraries in November 2007. Survey recipients were selected as the person in charge of Web site usability by visiting library Web sites and phone inquiry. The survey was concluded in January 2008 with a response rate of 74% (84 institutions). The researchers used t‐test to detect any difference in ARL library ranking between libraries with and without PSGs. Pair‐wise t‐tests were conducted to identify gaps in difficulty implementing PSGs. In addition, they used Pearson’s Correlation to investigate any significant correlations between variables such as ARL rank and resource allocation. Main Results – Of the 84 respondents, 34 (40%) have general library Web PSGs and 25 (30%) have specific usability PSGs; 41 (49%) have at least one type of in‐library PSG. Of the 43 (51%) libraries that do not have PSGs, 30 (36%) are at universities with institutional Web usability PSGs; 26 (87%) follow those guidelines. There was no statistically significant relationship between ARL ranking and PSG status (see Table 1). The authors asked about difficulty in implementing PSGs. Of the 32 libraries responding to a question about general library Web PSGs, most had slight or moderate difficulty. Twenty‐three libraries with specific usability PSGs identified difficulty levels; some had no difficulty, but a majority had moderate difficulty. For the 26 libraries using institutional Web usability PSGs, most had no or slight difficulty. Pair‐wise t‐tests showed that library Web usability PSGs were significantly more difficult to implement than university Web usability PSGs. Enforcement/agreement issues were reported as the primary difficulty in implementing in‐library PSGs. Technical issues and ambiguity were obstacles at the institutional level. More than half of the 84 libraries have Web advisory committees and about one third have usability committees or Web usability subcommittees. Several libraries answered that they have none of these committees, but indicat
Information Literacy Strategy Development: Study Prescribes Strategic Management Framework for Academic Institutions. A Review of: Corrall, Sheila.
Shandra Protzko
Evidence Based Library and Information Practice , 2008,
Abstract: Objective – To examine the development of information literacy (IL) strategies in higher education by assessing content and presentation of IL strategy documentation, and to explore the application of corporate strategy concepts and techniques to IL strategy. Design – Comparative, multi-case study. Qualitative analysis. Setting – U.K. universities. Subjects – Twelve information literacy strategy documents from ten institutions. Methods – Google was searched for IL strategy documents (restricted to the ac.uk domain), the LISINFOLITERACY discussion list was queried, and the Web sites of all U.K. universities were searched for a total sample of 12 documents at 10 institutions. Results of the data capture were discussed in the context of the literature on strategic management. Main Results – Corporate strategy tools and techniques are extensive in the literature, trending toward an emphasis on holistic thinking and marketing concepts. Many themes identified in the documents were consistent with the literature. While the format and style varied, all documents emphasized the integration of IL into subject curricula. All stressed the need to build collaborative partnerships between library/information staff and academic staff.Significantly, many strategies aimed to reach the broader institution, although poor articulation undermined this ambitious goal. In three, IL intervention was intended for the whole university community. However, the target audience often was not well-defined. Seven of the IL strategies identified additional partnerships to effect change at the policy level. Another key theme was the adoption of recognized IL standards; seven proposed the SCONUL (1999) model. All strategies recognized the importance of learning outcomes; six stated them explicitly. Prominent was the integration of e-learning resources, namely online tutorials. Many strategies recognized the need for marketing and advocacy activities. Half considered professional or staff development issues, as supported in the literature. All strategies explained in detail the context of their IL proposals, citing external challenges (growth of digital information, employer demand), external evidence (official reports, benchmarking statements, studies), and internal evidence (stakeholder concerns, institutional strategies) to support the need for IL. The documents specified a range of teaching modes from informal reference desk encounters to strategic positioning in relation to the broader community. Half defined or described IL. Seven documents were labelled strategies, but many did not
Topic-specific Infobuttons Reduce Search Time but their Clinical Impact is Unclear. A Review of: Del Fiol, Guilherme, Peter J. Haug, James J. Cimino, Scott P. Narus, Chuck Norlin, and Joyce A. Mitchell. Effectiveness of Topic-specific Infobuttons: A Randomized Controlled Trial. Journal of the American Medical Information Association 15.6 (2008): 752-9.
Shandra Protzko
Evidence Based Library and Information Practice , 2009,
Abstract: Objective – To assess whether infobutton links that direct users to specific content topics ( topic links ) are more effective in answering clinical questions than links that direct users to general overview content ( nonspecific links ). Design – Randomized control trial. Setting – Intermountain Healthcare, an integrated system of 21 hospitals and over 120 outpatient clinics located in Utah and southeastern Idaho. Subjects – Ninety clinicians and 3,729 infobutton sessions. Methods – To ensure comparable group composition, subjects were paired and randomly allocated to the study groups. Clinicians in the intervention group had access to topic links, while those in the control group had access to nonspecific links. All subjects at Intermountain Healthcare use a Web-based electronic medical record system (EMR) called HELP2 Clinical Desktop with integrated infobutton links. An Infobutton Manager application defines the content topics and resources; in this case, Micromedex (Thomson Healthcare, Englewood, CO) provided access to the topic links. The medication order entry module, the most popular of the outpatient modules, was selected to test the two configurations of infobuttons. A focus group of seven HELP2 users aided the researchers in determining the most salient topics to be displayed as a part of the intervention group's user-interface. The study measured infobutton session duration, or time spent seeking information, the number of infobutton sessions conducted, and the outcome and impact of the information seeking. A post-session questionnaire displayed randomly in 30% of sessions measured outcome and impact. The study was conducted between May and November, 2007. This project was funded in part by the National Library of Medicine. Main Results – Subjects in the intervention group spent 17.4% less time seeking information than those in the control group (35.5 seconds vs. 43 seconds, p = 0.008). The intervention group used infobuttons 20.5% more often (22 sessions vs. 17.5 sessions, p = 0.21) than those in the control group, a difference that was not statistically significant. Twenty-five subjects answered the post-session survey at least once for a total of 115 (9.9%) responses out of 1,161 possible sessions. The information seeking success rate was equally high in both groups (87.2% intervention vs. 89.4% control, p = .099). Subjects reported high positive clinical impact (i.e., decision enhancement or learning) in 62% of successful sessions. Subjects conveyed a moderate or high level of frustration in 80% of responses associated with unsuccessful
Update on the management of prostate cancer with goserelin acetate: patient perspectives
Shandra Wilson
Cancer Management and Research , 2009,
Abstract: Shandra WilsonDivision of Urology, University of Colorado, Aurora, CO, USAAbstract: The guidelines for the use of androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) have changed significantly over the last 5 years. This paper reviews the current recommendations and documents the reasons for these changes, in a review of the world’s literature on ADT over the last 5 years. Special emphasis on randomized controlled trials and high-impact journals was included in the Medline search and review. One hundred articles on this topic written in the last 5 years were reviewed. Fifty-nine contained nonindustry-biased findings in major-impact journals and were available in English. The benefits of ADT are evident in several areas, including neoadjuvantly and adjuvantly in patients treated with external beam radiation therapy for intermediate- and high-risk disease; in patients who have undergone prostatectomy and who are found to have lymph node involvement on surgical resection; in high-risk patients after definitive therapy; and in patients who have developed symptomatic local progression or metastasis. This paper reviews the risks and benefits in each of these scenarios and the risks of androgen deprivation in general, and delineates the areas where ADT was previously recommended, but has been found to no longer be of benefit.Keywords: prostate cancer, goserelin acetate
An Update on the Changing Indications for Androgen Deprivation Therapy for Prostate Cancer
Kristene Myklak,Shandra Wilson
Prostate Cancer , 2011, DOI: 10.1155/2011/419174
Abstract: Quality of life has become increasingly more important for men diagnosed with prostate cancer. In light of this and the recognized risks of androgen deprivation therapy (ADT), the guidelines and use of ADT have changed significantly over the last few years. This paper reviews the current recommendations and the future perspectives regarding ADT. The benefits of ADT are evident neoadjuvantly and adjuvantly in patients treated with external beam radiation therapy for intermediate- and high-risk disease, in patients who have undergone prostatectomy with lymph node involvement, in high-risk patients after definitive therapy, and in patients who have developed progression or metastasis. Finally, this paper reviews the risks and benefits of each of these scenarios and the risks of androgen deprivation in general, and it delineates the areas where ADT was previously recommended, but where evidence is lacking for its additional benefit. 1. Introduction Prostate cancer is the most frequently diagnosed cancer in males in the United States and has long been associated with hormone dependence [1]. The use of androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) for men with advanced prostate cancer continues to be the recommended therapy. Androgen deprivation is defined as a lowering of serum testosterone through the administration of a luteinizing hormone releasing hormone (LHRH) agonist. However, it has become increasingly apparent that ADT is not without its own risks. ADT-associated risks continue to become more fully elucidated through multiple recently published retrospective and prospective studies. These risks are no longer solely defined by life span and cancer progression but also by how ADT affects quality of life based on a patient’s physical, financial, and emotional well being. There is also evidence that a “middle of the road”, intermittent androgen deprivation therapy (IADT) may soon be appropriate care for some individuals with prostate cancer. This paper examines IADT and the clinical studies that are being done that suggest it as a possible alternative in the future. This paper also reviews the findings of investigations into the risks and benefits of ADT. It will delineate areas where ADT use has been deemed inappropriate/ineffective and summarizes the current clinical situations where ADT use remains recommended. 2. Androgen Deprivation and Associated Adverse Events 2.1. Cardiovascular Disease ADT utilizes the fact that malignant prostate cells require androgen stimulation for growth and division. ADT attempts to deny malignant cells a growth stimulus,
Renal Angiomyolipoma Presenting as Fever of Unknown Origin  [PDF]
Manisha Bhide, Patricia Bolshoun, Shandra Wilson, Kenneth A. Iczkowski
Open Journal of Urology (OJU) , 2012, DOI: 10.4236/oju.2012.23026
Abstract: A 50 yr man presented with fatigue and fever. He was found to have a 7.2 cm left renal mass. Radical nephrectomy was done. The mass was HMB-45 negative renal angiomyolipoma. This patient did not have tuberous sclerosis. His fever resolved after the tumor excision. This case is unique because of the unusual morphology and histology of the tumor. It reiterates that getting rid of inflammatory cytokines being produced by the tumor will cause resolution of fever.
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