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Search Results: 1 - 10 of 148250 matches for " Roger B Fillingim "
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Thermal hypersensitivity in a subset of irritable bowel syndrome patients
QiQi Zhou, Roger B Fillingim, Joseph L Riley III, G Nicholas Verne
World Journal of Gastroenterology , 2009,
Abstract: AIM: To characterize thermal hypersensitivity in patients with constipation- and diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome (IBS).METHODS: Thermal pain sensitivity was tested among patients with diarrhea-predominant IBS (D-IBS) and constipation-predominant IBS (C-IBS) compared to healthy subjects. A total of 42 patients (29 female and 13 male; mean age 27.0 ± 6.4 years) with D-IBS; 24 patients (16 female and eight male; mean age 32.5 ± 8.8 years) with C-IBS; and 52 control subjects (34 female and 18 male; mean age 27.3 ± 8.0 years) participated in the study. Thermal stimuli were delivered using a Medoc Thermal Sensory Analyzer with a 3 cm × 3 cm surface area. Heat pain threshold (HPTh) and heat pain tolerance (HPTo) were assessed on the left ventral forearm and left calf using an ascending method of limits. The Functional Bowel Disease Severity Index (FBDSI) was also obtained for all subjects.RESULTS: Controls were less sensitive than C-IBS and D-IBS (both at P < 0.001) with no differences between C-IBS and D-IBS for HPTh and HPTo. Thermal hyperalgesia was present in both groups of IBS patients relative to controls, with IBS patients reporting significantly lower pain threshold and pain tolerance at both test sites. Cluster analysis revealed the presence of subgroups of IBS patients based on thermal hyperalgesia. One cluster (17% of the sample) showed a profile of heat pain sensitivity very similar to that of healthy controls; a second cluster (47% of the sample) showed moderate heat pain sensitivity; and a third cluster (36% of the sample) showed a very high degree of thermal hyperalgesia.CONCLUSION: A subset of IBS patients had thermal hypersensitivity compared to controls, who reported significantly lower HPTh and HPTo. All IBS patients had a higher score on the FBDSI than controls. Interestingly, the subset of IBS patients with high thermal sensitivity (36%) had the highest FBDSI score compared to the other two groups of IBS patients.
Slow Temporal Summation of Pain for Assessment of Central Pain Sensitivity and Clinical Pain of Fibromyalgia Patients
Roland Staud, Elizabeth E. Weyl, Joseph L. Riley, Roger B. Fillingim
PLOS ONE , 2014, DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0089086
Abstract: Background In healthy individuals slow temporal summation of pain or wind-up (WU) can be evoked by repetitive heat-pulses at frequencies of ≥.33 Hz. Previous WU studies have used various stimulus frequencies and intensities to characterize central sensitization of human subjects including fibromyalgia (FM) patients. However, many trials demonstrated considerable WU-variability including zero WU or even wind-down (WD) at stimulus intensities sufficient for activating C-nociceptors. Additionally, few WU-protocols have controlled for contributions of individual pain sensitivity to WU-magnitude, which is critical for WU-comparisons. We hypothesized that integration of 3 different WU-trains into a single WU-response function (WU-RF) would not only control for individuals’ pain sensitivity but also better characterize their central pain responding including WU and WD. Methods 33 normal controls (NC) and 38 FM patients participated in a study of heat-WU. We systematically varied stimulus intensities of.4 Hz heat-pulse trains applied to the hands. Pain summation was calculated as difference scores of 1st and 5th heat-pulse ratings. WU-difference (WU-Δ) scores related to 3 heat-pulse trains (44°C, 46°C, 48°C) were integrated into WU-response functions whose slopes were used to assess group differences in central pain sensitivity. WU-aftersensations (WU-AS) at 15 s and 30 s were used to predict clinical FM pain intensity. Results WU-Δ scores linearly accelerated with increasing stimulus intensity (p<.001) in both groups of subjects (FM>NC) from WD to WU. Slope of WU-RF, which is representative of central pain sensitivity, was significantly steeper in FM patients than NC (p<.003). WU-AS predicted clinical FM pain intensity (Pearson’s r = .4; p<.04). Conclusions Compared to single WU series, WU-RFs integrate individuals’ pain sensitivity as well as WU and WD. Slope of WU-RFs was significantly different between FM patients and NC. Therefore WU-RF may be useful for assessing central sensitization of chronic pain patients in research and clinical practice.
A computational model for sex-specific genetic architecture of complex traits in humans: Implications for mapping pain sensitivity
Chenguang Wang, Yun Cheng, Tian Liu, Qin Li, Roger B Fillingim, Margaret R Wallace, Roland Staud, Lee Kaplan, Rongling Wu
Molecular Pain , 2008, DOI: 10.1186/1744-8069-4-13
Abstract: Differences in males and females (sexual dimorphism) is ubiquitous in many biological aspects [1-3]. In humans, sexually dimorphic traits include those from morphological shapes and body size to brain development to disease susceptibility [4,5]. Substantial differences are also observed in sensitivities to pain and pain-killing drugs, and susceptibility to developing chronic pain between men and women [6-8]. All these sex-specific differences are due to varying expression of genes on the X/Y chromosome and autosomes, thought to result from differences in cellular and hormonal environments between the two sexes [9]. A growing body of research has been conducted to elucidate the genetic control of sexual dimorphism in various complex phenotypes by gene mapping approaches [4,5,10,11]. Despite these efforts, however, little is known about the genetic architecture underlying sex-related variation in a quantitative trait.Since sex is easily determined, the effects of sex on morphological, developmental and pathological traits can be directly observed. However, characterizing the impacts of sex on the genetic architecture of these traits has been challenged by a lack of powerful statistical approaches. The motivation of this article is to develop a statistical and computational model that can systematically search for sex-specific genes contributing to quantitative variation and formulate testable hypotheses regarding the interplay between sexes and gene expression. Our model is principally different from those used in many previous studies that are aimed to detect sex-specific quantitative trait loci (QTLs) based on linkage or linkage disequilibrium analysis [2,4,5,12,13]. Our model will be founded on the statistical framework constructed by Liu et al. [14] to detect the effects and diversity of haplotypes constructed by single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that are genotyped at candidate genes or genome-wide [15]. Our model has been generalized to allow the test of sex
Modeling genetic imprinting effects of DNA sequences with multilocus polymorphism data
Sheron Wen, Chenguang Wang, Arthur Berg, Yao Li, Myron M Chang, Roger B Fillingim, Margaret R Wallace, Roland Staud, Lee Kaplan, Rongling Wu
Algorithms for Molecular Biology , 2009, DOI: 10.1186/1748-7188-4-11
Abstract: In diploid organisms, there are two copies at every autosomal gene, one inherited from the maternal parent and the other from the paternal parent. Both copies are expressed to affect a trait for a majority of these genes. Yet, there is also a small subset of genes for which one copy from a particular parent is turned off. These genes, whose expression depends on the parent of origin due to the epigenetic or imprinted mark of one copy in either the egg or the sperm, have been thought to play an important role in complex diseases and traits, although imprinted expression can also vary between tissues, developmental stages, and species [1]. Anomalies derived from imprinted genes are often manifested as developmental and neurological disorders during early development and as cancer later in life [2-5].The mechanisms for genetic imprinting are still incompletely known, but they involve epigenetic modifications that are erased and then reset during the formation of eggs and sperm. Recent research shows that the parent-of-origin dependent expression of imprinted genes is related with environmental interactions with the genome [5]. The phenomenon of genomic imprinting is explained from an evolutionary perspective [6]. Genomic imprinting evolves in mammals with the advent of live birth through a parental battle between the sexes to control the maternal expenditure of resources to the offspring [7].Paternally expressed imprinted genes tend to promote offspring growth by extracting nutrients from the mother during pregnancy while it is suppressed by those genes that are maternally expressed. This genetic battle between the paternal and maternal parents appears to continue even after birth [8,9].The genetic mechanisms for imprinting can be made clear if the genomic distribution of imprinted genes and their actions and interactions are studied. Genetic mapping with molecular markers and linkage maps has been used to map quantitative trait loci (QTLs) that show parent-of-origin e
Chronic pain, perceived stress, and cellular aging: an exploratory study
Kimberly T Sibille, Taimour Langaee, Ben Burkley, Yan Gong, Toni L Glover, Chris King, Joseph L Riley, Christiaan Leeuwenburgh, Roland Staud, Laurence A Bradley, Roger B Fillingim
Molecular Pain , 2012, DOI: 10.1186/1744-8069-8-12
Abstract: The relationship between chronic pain, stress, and TL was analyzed in 36 ethnically diverse, older adults, half of whom reported no chronic pain and the other half had chronic knee osteoarthritis (OA) pain. Subjects completed a physical exam, radiographs, health history, and psychosocial questionnaires. Blood samples were collected and TL was measured by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). Four groups were identified characterized by pain status and the Perceived Stress Scale scores: 1) no pain/low stress, 2) no pain/high stress, chronic pain/low stress, and 4) chronic pain/high stress. TL differed between the pain/stress groups (p = 0.01), controlling for relevant covariates. Specifically, the chronic pain/high stress group had significantly shorter TL compared to the no pain/low stress group. Age was negatively correlated with TL, particularly in the chronic pain/high stress group (p = 0.03).Although preliminary in nature and based on a modest sample size, these findings indicate that cellular aging may be more pronounced in older adults experiencing high levels of perceived stress and chronic pain.A recent Institute of Medicine report documents the public health consequences of chronic pain in America with estimates of 116 million adults affected and costs of $635 billion annually [1]. One of the challenges illuminated in the report is the difficulty in identifying specific pathophysiological targets due to significant variability in the experience of chronic pain. Consequently, biological markers reflecting the physiological burden of chronic pain on an individual system would offer significant clinical and scientific utility.Leukocyte telomere length (TL) is a measure of cellular aging and is associated with age-related disease onset, chronic health conditions, psychosocial stress, and mortality [2-5]. Importantly, recent findings indicate a direct relationship between telomeres and mitochondria, connecting for the first time two major theories of ag
Effects of genetic variation in H3K79 methylation regulatory genes on clinical blood pressure and blood pressure response to hydrochlorothiazide
Julio D Duarte, Issam Zineh, Ben Burkley, Yan Gong, Taimour Y Langaee, Stephen T Turner, Arlene B Chapman, Eric Boerwinkle, John G Gums, Rhonda M Cooper-DeHoff, Amber L Beitelshees, Kent R Bailey, Roger B Fillingim, Bruce C Kone, Julie A Johnson
Journal of Translational Medicine , 2012, DOI: 10.1186/1479-5876-10-56
Abstract: We investigated associations between genetic variations in this candidate pathway and HCTZ blood pressure response in two separate hypertensive cohorts (clinicaltrials.gov NCT00246519 and NCT00005520). In a secondary, exploratory analysis, we measured associations between these same genetic variations and untreated blood pressure. Associations were measured by linear regression, with only associations with P ≤ 0.01 in one cohort and replication by P ≤ 0.05 in the other cohort considered significant.In one cohort, a polymorphism in DOT1L (rs2269879) was strongly associated with greater systolic (P = 0.0002) and diastolic (P = 0.0016) blood pressure response to hydrochlorothiazide in Caucasians. However, this association was not replicated in the other cohort. When untreated blood pressure levels were analyzed, we found directionally similar associations between a polymorphism in MLLT3 (rs12350051) and greater untreated systolic (P < 0.01 in both cohorts) and diastolic (P < 0.05 in both cohorts) blood pressure levels in both cohorts. However, when further replication was attempted in a third hypertensive cohort and in smaller, normotensive samples, significant associations were not observed.Our data suggest polymorphisms in DOT1L, MLLT3, SIRT1, and SGK1 are not likely associated with blood pressure response to HCTZ. However, a possibility exists that rs2269879 in DOT1L could be associated with HCTZ response in Caucasians. Additionally, exploratory analyses suggest rs12350051 in MLLT3 may be associated with untreated blood pressure in African-Americans. Replication efforts are needed to verify roles for these polymorphisms in human blood pressure regulation.Hydrochlorothiazide (HCTZ) is one of the most commonly prescribed antihypertensive drug in the US, with approximately 118 million prescriptions dispensed in 2010, either alone or combined with another antihypertensive [1,2]. HCTZ and other thiazide diuretics are recommended by current hypertension treatment guidelin
COLOUR DEVELOPMENT ON DRYING
Keey,Roger B;
Maderas. Ciencia y tecnología , 2005, DOI: 10.4067/S0718-221X2005000100001
Abstract: the drying of wet materials induces a number of physico-chemical changes in the product, often reflected in colour. for dried products sold on appearance, like certain grades of wood, the extent of colour development is highly significant in terms of the material’s end-use. until recently, colour was normally assessed by eye, but the availability of convenient spectrophotometers has provided industrial users with a means of quantitative description of colour. examples from wood technology include assessing the impact of biological surface treatment, the impact of ultraviolet radiation, and screening of drying schedules by evaluating kiln brown-stain development. in other applications, the depth of colour might be used for the screening of drying schedules as an adjunct to other tests for stress development, or to pinpoint reaction and knotty wood in boards by an online scanner
Product involutions with 0 or 1-dimensional fixed point sets on orientable handlebodies
Roger B. Nelson
International Journal of Mathematics and Mathematical Sciences , 1994, DOI: 10.1155/s0161171294000669
Abstract: Let h be an involution with a 0 or 1-dimensional fixed point set on an orientable handlebody M. We show that obvious necessary conditions for fibering M as A —I so that h= —r with an involution of A and r reflection about the midpoint of I also turn out to be sufficient. We also show that such a “product ” involution is determined by its fixed point set.
A decomposition into homeomorphic handlebodies with naturally equivalent involutions
Roger B. Nelson
International Journal of Mathematics and Mathematical Sciences , 1990, DOI: 10.1155/s0161171290000059
Abstract: Downing [6] extended the well-known result that any closed 3-manifold X contains a handlebody H such that c1(X ¢ ’H) is homeomorphic to H in the case where X is a compact 3-manifold with nonvoid boundary. We show that if X is a compact 3-manifold with involution h having 2-dimensional fixed point set, then X contains an h-invariant handlebody H such that the involutions induced on H and c1(X ¢ ’H) are naturally equivalent.
COLOUR DEVELOPMENT ON DRYING
Roger B Keey
MADERAS : Ciencia y Tecnología , 2005,
Abstract: The drying of wet materials induces a number of physico-chemical changes in the product, often reflected in colour. For dried products sold on appearance, like certain grades of wood, the extent of colour development is highly significant in terms of the material’s end-use. Until recently, colour was normally assessed by eye, but the availability of convenient spectrophotometers has provided industrial users with a means of quantitative description of colour. Examples from wood technology include assessing the impact of biological surface treatment, the impact of ultraviolet radiation, and screening of drying schedules by evaluating kiln brown-stain development. In other applications, the depth of colour might be used for the screening of drying schedules as an adjunct to other tests for stress development, or to pinpoint reaction and knotty wood in boards by an online scanner
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