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Search Results: 1 - 10 of 27391 matches for " Robert Passier "
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Work related musculoskeletal disorders amongst therapists in physically demanding roles: qualitative analysis of risk factors and strategies for prevention
Leanne Passier, Steven McPhail
BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders , 2011, DOI: 10.1186/1471-2474-12-24
Abstract: A two phase exploratory investigation was undertaken. The first phase included a survey administered via a web based platform with qualitative open response items. The second phase involved four focus group sessions which explored topics obtained from the survey. Thematic analysis of qualitative data from the survey and focus groups was undertaken.Overall 112 (34.3%) of invited health professionals completed the survey; 66 (58.9%) were physiotherapists and 46 (41.1%) were occupational therapists. Twenty-four health professionals participated in one of four focus groups. The risk factors most frequently perceived by health professionals included: work postures and movements, lifting or carrying, patient related factors and repetitive tasks. The six primary themes for strategies to allow therapists to continue to work in physically demanding clinical roles included: organisational strategies, workload or work allocation, work practices, work environment and equipment, physical condition and capacity, and education and training.Risk factors as well as current and potential strategies for reducing WRMD amongst these health professionals working in clinically demanding roles have been identified and discussed. Further investigation regarding the relative effectiveness of these strategies is warranted.High rates of employee injury within the health care industry are well documented[1-16]. Previous reports regarding the incidence of work related musculoskeletal disorders (WRMD) indicate that physiotherapy (also known as physical therapy) and occupational therapy are two professions that are at high risk [5,11,14,16]. Studies amongst physiotherapists (PT) have revealed as many as 91% experience WRMD during their career[5] with recurrence rates of up to 88%[16]. It has also been reported that 80% of PT experience symptoms in at least one body area over a 12 month period [5]. One in six PT have been reported to change their area of specialty or leave the profession as a resul
Human Embryonic and Fetal Mesenchymal Stem Cells Differentiate toward Three Different Cardiac Lineages in Contrast to Their Adult Counterparts
Arti A. Ramkisoensing, Dani?l A. Pijnappels, Sa?d F. A. Askar, Robert Passier, Jim Swildens, Marie José Goumans, Cindy I. Schutte, Antoine A. F. de Vries, Sicco Scherjon, Christine L. Mummery, Martin J. Schalij, Douwe E. Atsma
PLOS ONE , 2011, DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0024164
Abstract: Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) show unexplained differences in differentiation potential. In this study, differentiation of human (h) MSCs derived from embryonic, fetal and adult sources toward cardiomyocytes, endothelial and smooth muscle cells was investigated. Labeled hMSCs derived from embryonic stem cells (hESC-MSCs), fetal umbilical cord, bone marrow, amniotic membrane and adult bone marrow and adipose tissue were co-cultured with neonatal rat cardiomyocytes (nrCMCs) or cardiac fibroblasts (nrCFBs) for 10 days, and also cultured under angiogenic conditions. Cardiomyogenesis was assessed by human-specific immunocytological analysis, whole-cell current-clamp recordings, human-specific qRT-PCR and optical mapping. After co-culture with nrCMCs, significantly more hESC-MSCs than fetal hMSCs stained positive for α-actinin, whereas adult hMSCs stained negative. Furthermore, functional cardiomyogenic differentiation, based on action potential recordings, was shown to occur, but not in adult hMSCs. Of all sources, hESC-MSCs expressed most cardiac-specific genes. hESC-MSCs and fetal hMSCs contained significantly higher basal levels of connexin43 than adult hMSCs and co-culture with nrCMCs increased expression. After co-culture with nrCFBs, hESC-MSCs and fetal hMSCs did not express α-actinin and connexin43 expression was decreased. Conduction velocity (CV) in co-cultures of nrCMCs and hESC-MSCs was significantly higher than in co-cultures with fetal or adult hMSCs. In angiogenesis bioassays, only hESC-MSCs and fetal hMSCs were able to form capillary-like structures, which stained for smooth muscle and endothelial cell markers.Human embryonic and fetal MSCs differentiate toward three different cardiac lineages, in contrast to adult MSCs. Cardiomyogenesis is determined by stimuli from the cellular microenvironment, where connexin43 may play an important role.
Pharmacodynamic analysis of the analgesic effect of capsaicin 8% patch (QutenzaTM) in diabetic neuropathic pain patients: detection of distinct response groups
Martini C,Yassen A,Olofsen E,Passier P
Journal of Pain Research , 2012,
Abstract: Christian Martini1,*, Ashraf Yassen2,*, Erik Olofsen1, Paul Passier2, Malcom Stoker3, Albert Dahan1 1Department of Anesthesiology, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, The Netherlands; 2Global Clinical Pharmacology and Exploratory Development, Astellas Pharma Global Development Europe, Leiderdorp, The Netherlands; 3Global Medical Sciences, Astellas Pharma Global Development Europe, Leiderdorp, The Netherlands*These authors contributed equally to this workAbstract: Treatment of chronic pain is associated with high variability in the response to pharmacological interventions. A mathematical pharmacodynamic model was developed to quantify the magnitude and onset/offset times of effect of a single capsaicin 8% patch application in the treatment of painful diabetic peripheral neuropathy in 91 patients. In addition, a mixture model was applied to objectively match patterns in pain-associated behavior. The model identified four distinct subgroups that responded differently to treatment: 3.3% of patients (subgroup 1) showed worsening of pain; 31% (subgroup 2) showed no change; 32% (subgroup 3) showed a quick reduction in pain that reached a nadir in week 3, followed by a slow return towards baseline (16% ± 6% pain reduction in week 12); 34% (subgroup 4) showed a quick reduction in pain that persisted (70% ± 5% reduction in week 12). The estimate of the response-onset rate constant, obtained for subgroups 1, 3, and 4, was 0.76 ± 0.12 week-1 (median ± SE), indicating that every 0.91 weeks the pain score reduces or increases by 50% relative to the score of the previous week (= t ). The response-offset rate constant could be determined for subgroup 3 only and was 0.09 ± 0.04 week-1 (t 7.8 weeks). The analysis allowed separation of a heterogeneous neuropathic pain population into four homogenous subgroups with distinct behaviors in response to treatment with capsaicin. It is argued that this model-based approach may have added value in analyzing longitudinal chronic pain data and allows optimization of treatment algorithms for patients suffering from chronic pain conditions.Keywords: diabetic neuropathic pain, capsaicin 8%, modeling, mixture model
Pharmacodynamic analysis of the analgesic effect of capsaicin 8% patch (QutenzaTM) in diabetic neuropathic pain patients: detection of distinct response groups
Martini C, Yassen A, Olofsen E, Passier P, Stoker M, Dahan A
Journal of Pain Research , 2012, DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/JPR.S30406
Abstract: rmacodynamic analysis of the analgesic effect of capsaicin 8% patch (QutenzaTM) in diabetic neuropathic pain patients: detection of distinct response groups Original Research (2587) Total Article Views Authors: Martini C, Yassen A, Olofsen E, Passier P, Stoker M, Dahan A Published Date March 2012 Volume 2012:5 Pages 51 - 59 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/JPR.S30406 Received: 31 January 2012 Accepted: 21 February 2012 Published: 15 March 2012 Christian Martini1,*, Ashraf Yassen2,*, Erik Olofsen1, Paul Passier2, Malcom Stoker3, Albert Dahan1 1Department of Anesthesiology, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, The Netherlands; 2Global Clinical Pharmacology and Exploratory Development, Astellas Pharma Global Development Europe, Leiderdorp, The Netherlands; 3Global Medical Sciences, Astellas Pharma Global Development Europe, Leiderdorp, The Netherlands *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Treatment of chronic pain is associated with high variability in the response to pharmacological interventions. A mathematical pharmacodynamic model was developed to quantify the magnitude and onset/offset times of effect of a single capsaicin 8% patch application in the treatment of painful diabetic peripheral neuropathy in 91 patients. In addition, a mixture model was applied to objectively match patterns in pain-associated behavior. The model identified four distinct subgroups that responded differently to treatment: 3.3% of patients (subgroup 1) showed worsening of pain; 31% (subgroup 2) showed no change; 32% (subgroup 3) showed a quick reduction in pain that reached a nadir in week 3, followed by a slow return towards baseline (16% ± 6% pain reduction in week 12); 34% (subgroup 4) showed a quick reduction in pain that persisted (70% ± 5% reduction in week 12). The estimate of the response-onset rate constant, obtained for subgroups 1, 3, and 4, was 0.76 ± 0.12 week-1 (median ± SE), indicating that every 0.91 weeks the pain score reduces or increases by 50% relative to the score of the previous week (= t ). The response-offset rate constant could be determined for subgroup 3 only and was 0.09 ± 0.04 week-1 (t 7.8 weeks). The analysis allowed separation of a heterogeneous neuropathic pain population into four homogenous subgroups with distinct behaviors in response to treatment with capsaicin. It is argued that this model-based approach may have added value in analyzing longitudinal chronic pain data and allows optimization of treatment algorithms for patients suffering from chronic pain conditions.
Introduction to a Requirements Engineering Framework for Aeronautics  [PDF]
Robert Abo
Journal of Software Engineering and Applications (JSEA) , 2010, DOI: 10.4236/jsea.2010.39105
Abstract: This paper introduces a framework to produce and to manage quality requirements of embedded aeronautical systems, called the ‘Requirements Engineering Framework’ (REF). It aims at making the management of the requirement lifecycle easier, from the specification of the purchaser’s needs, to their implementation in the final products, and also their verification, while controlling costs. REF is based on the main standards of aeronautics, in particular RTCA DO-254, and RTCA DO-178B standards. An implementation of REF, using the IBM Rational DOORS and IBM Rational Change tools, is also presented in this paper.
Pricing Options in Jump Diffusion Models Using Mellin Transforms  [PDF]
Robert Frontczak
Journal of Mathematical Finance (JMF) , 2013, DOI: 10.4236/jmf.2013.33037
Abstract:

This paper is concerned with the valuation of options in jump diffusion models. The partial integro-differential equation (PIDE) inherent in the pricing problem is solved by using the Mellin integral transform. The solution is a single integral expression independent of the distribution of the jump size. We also derive analytical expressions for the Greeks. The results are implemented and compared to other approaches.

Australia’s Out-Dated Concern over Fishing Threatens Wise Marine Conservation and Ecologically Sustainable Seafood Supply  [PDF]
Robert Kearney
Open Journal of Marine Science (OJMS) , 2013, DOI: 10.4236/ojms.2013.32006
Abstract:

Seafood plays an important role in human nutrition and its increased consumption is actively recommended for sustenance and health benefits in both developing and developed countries. In parallel to this, the public receives confusing advice as to what seafood is sustainably produced and is frequently misled about the environmental impacts of fishing, especially in locations such as Australia where contemporary fishery management has a conservation and sustainability focus. It is recognised globally that Australia’s traditional fishery management driven by strict sustainability and biodiversity regulations, has achieved impressive results in managing both fish stocks and the effects of fishing on marine environments. Despite this, continued pressure from non-government organisations (NGOs) and a perpetuation of the misuse of management terms such as overfished is used to promote the misguided need for ever increasing fishing restrictions, most obviously in protected areas. This paper questions the motives of some NGOs and governments in Australia in pursuing additional restrictions on fishing which are mostly unnecessary and disproportionate to the sustainability requirements of other sources of food. This is done within the context of the global need for sustainable seafood supply and the need for effective marine conservation that addresses all threats to marine ecosystems in proportion to the magnitude of each threat.

Wearable and wireless accelerometer systems for monitoring Parkinson’s disease patients—A perspective review  [PDF]
Robert LeMoyne
Advances in Parkinson's Disease (APD) , 2013, DOI: 10.4236/apd.2013.24021
Abstract: Parkinson’s disease is a growing medical concern as societies, such as the United States of America, become progressively aged. Therapy strategies exist for the amelioration of Parkinson’s disease symptoms, and the quantification of attributes, such as hand tremor, can provide valuable feedback. Wearable and wireless accelerometer systems for monitoring Parkinson’s disease patients have been progressively advanced over the course of the past half-decade. In particular, wireless accelerometer nodes and smartphones, such as the iPhone, hold promise for optimizing therapy strategy by providing convenient quantified feedback. This perspective review addresses the current advances in wearable and wireless accelerometer systems for monitoring Parkinson’s disease patients and forecasts for the near future.
A Study of Lateralized Cognitive Processes in Upper-Division Electrical Engineering Students’: Correlating Written Language Functions with Analytical Reasoning in Microelectronics  [PDF]
Robert Melendy
World Journal of Engineering and Technology (WJET) , 2014, DOI: 10.4236/wjet.2014.22008
Abstract: The human brain is asymmetrical in function, with each of its two hemispheres being somewhat responsible for distinct cognitive and motor tasks, to include writing. It stands to reason that engineering students who have established entrance into their upper-division programs will have demonstrated cognitive proficiency in math and logical operations, abstract and analytical reasoning and language usage, to include writing. In this study the question was asked: is there a correlation between an upper-division electrical engineering students’ analytical reasoning ability and their descriptive writing ability? Descriptive writing is taken here to mean a students’ ability to identify key physical aspects of a mathematical model and to express—in words—a concise and well-balanced description that demonstrates a deep conceptual understanding of the model. This includes more than a description of the variables or the particular application to an engineering problem; it includes a demonstrated recognition of the basic physics that govern the model, certain limitations (idealizations) inherent in the model, and an understanding of how to make practical experimental measurements to verify the governing physics in the model. A student at this level may demonstrate proficiency in their analytical reasoning skills and hence be capable of correctly solving a given problem. However, this does not guarantee that the same student is skilled in associating equations with their physical meaning on a deep conceptual level or in understanding physical limitations of the equation. Consequently, such a student may demonstrate difficulty in mapping their comprehension of the model into written language that demonstrates a sound conceptual understanding of the governing physics. The findings represent a sample of two independent class sections of Electrical and Computer Engineering junior’s first course in Microe-lectronic Devices and Circuits during fall semesters 2012 and 2013 at a private mid-size university in NW Oregon. A total of three exams were administered to each of the 2012/2013 groups. Correlations between exam scores that students achieved on their descriptive writing of microelectronics phenomena and their analytical problem-solving abilities were examined and found to be quite significant.
Foilized pouches can prevent the transmission of HIV from mother to child using multi-drug therapies  [PDF]
Robert Malkin
Journal of Biomedical Science and Engineering (JBiSE) , 2014, DOI: 10.4236/jbise.2014.71007
Abstract: Children can become HIV positive (HIV+) from their mother during home birth. If the infant ingests antiretroviral (ARV), medications immediately after birth, the risk of transmission can be dramatically reduced. We have previously proposed the use of foilized, polyethylene-lined pouches to store ARV’s. Using the pouch, the mother receives the medication at an antenatal care visit, months before delivery, and if she delivers at home, tears open the pouch and drips the medication into her child’s mouth. In this work, we extend the use of the pouch to store a modern ARV, Lamivudine (3TC), often used in multi-drug regimens. Under laboratory conditions, pouches were filled with 3TC and stored at 25?C/60% relative humidity (RH) for twelve months. We found that the 3TC was stable throughout the year (maximum 5.6% of labeled concentration change). The preservatives were somewhat degraded by the act of repackaging the medicine, but sufficient preservatives remained to maintain the medication. The same impurities were identified in the 3TC stored in the pouches and the samples removed from the bottles indicating that the pouches do not introduce new impurities (impurities that are not already introduced by the bottle). We conclude that the pouch can preserve this modern ARV for up to twelve months.
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