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Search Results: 1 - 10 of 21413 matches for " Rate Pressure Product (RPP) "
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Analysis of hemodynamic responses to resistance exercise performed with different intensities and recovery intervals  [PDF]
Dihogo Gama de Matos, Felipe José Aidar, Mauro Lucio Mazini Filho, Rosimar da Silva Salgueiro, Jordana Cristina de Oliveira, Ingi P. Klain, Robert C. Hickner, André Luis Carneiro, Estélio Henrique Martin Dantas
Health (Health) , 2013, DOI: 10.4236/health.2013.52021
Abstract: This aim of the present study was to analyze the hemodynamic responses during resistance exercise performed at different intensities and with different recovery intervals. This study was conducted on twenty-four apparently healthy male individuals (25.50 ± 3.72 years and 76.50 ± 4.50 kg) experienced in strength training. The volunteers performed a 1RM test to determine the training load for the study. Blood pressure and Rate Pressure Product were measured before and at the end of the exercise training. The only significant difference observed was in SBP during strength training at 70% intensity (121.7 ± 8.68, p = 0.039), which was lower than SBP at the remaining intensities of 80% (126.3 ± 7.11) and 90% (127.1 ± 7.51). It was concluded that strength training performed at different intensities and recovery intervals did not significantly alter most variables, changing only the SBP due to the intensity employed.
Study on little active and sedentary women: Comparison between protocols and prospects for admission in physical activity program  [PDF]
A. D. P. Bankoff, C. A. Zamai, J. Rocha, P. R. Mendes Guimar?es
Open Journal of Preventive Medicine (OJPM) , 2013, DOI: 10.4236/ojpm.2013.36056
Abstract: The aim of this work was to study little active and sedentary women through physical assessments using anthropometric measurements and exercise testing using the Naughton and Bruce protocols. Approximately 53 women were evaluated: Group 1—comprised of 17 completely sedentary women, aged 25-58 years, mean age 44.4 years, and Group 2—comprised of 36 women who answered doing physical activities once or twice a week (low active), aged 28-54 years, mean age 39.5 years. The results Group 1— high weight, body mass index showing overweight, heart rate above the target areas of your training, i.e., above 85% effort. Systolic blood pressure reached a high level in the seventh stage with 21 minutes of effort (177.3) and diastolic (92.7). Group 2—normal weight, body mass index recorded is considered thin, heart rate heart zones above the target of your training, i.e., above 85% effort also. Systolic blood pressure reached the highest level in phase 1 recovery (156.75). Diastolic blood pressure recorded pressure levels considered normal for the type of work done by the group. The values reported for the double product are considered normal for the type of effort made by both groups. Conclusion: The participants from group 1 are able to join physical activity programs from the results presented, specifically due to weight, BMI, heart rate and blood pressure. The participants from group 2 require more days of practice of physical activities and longer hours to improve the levels of heart rate and blood pressure.
Post-exercise changes in blood pressure, heart rate and rate pressure product at different exercise intensities in normotensive humans
Forjaz, C.L.M.;Matsudaira, Y.;Rodrigues, F.B.;Nunes, N.;Negr?o, C.E.;
Brazilian Journal of Medical and Biological Research , 1998, DOI: 10.1590/S0100-879X1998001000003
Abstract: to evaluate the effect of exercise intensity on post-exercise cardiovascular responses, 12 young normotensive subjects performed in a randomized order three cycle ergometer exercise bouts of 45 min at 30, 50 and 80% of vo2peak, and 12 subjects rested for 45 min in a non-exercise control trial. blood pressure (bp) and heart rate (hr) were measured for 20 min prior to exercise (baseline) and at intervals of 5 to 30 (r5-30), 35 to 60 (r35-60) and 65 to 90 (r65-90) min after exercise. systolic, mean, and diastolic bp after exercise were significantly lower than baseline, and there was no difference between the three exercise intensities. after exercise at 30% of vo2peak, hr was significantly decreased at r35-60 and r65-90. in contrast, after exercise at 50 and 80% of vo2peak, hr was significantly increased at r5-30 and r35-60, respectively. exercise at 30% of vo2peak significantly decreased rate pressure (rp) product (rp = hr x systolic bp) during the entire recovery period (baseline = 7930 ± 314 vs r5-30 = 7150 ± 326, r35-60 = 6794 ± 349, and r65-90 = 6628 ± 311, p<0.05), while exercise at 50% of vo2peak caused no change, and exercise at 80% of vo2peak produced a significant increase at r5-30 (7468 ± 267 vs 9818 ± 366, p<0.05) and no change at r35-60 or r65-90. cardiovascular responses were not altered during the control trial. in conclusion, varying exercise intensity from 30 to 80% of vo2peak in young normotensive humans did not influence the magnitude of post-exercise hypotension. however, in contrast to exercise at 50 and 80% of vo2peak, exercise at 30% of vo2peak decreased post-exercise hr and rp.
Post-exercise changes in blood pressure, heart rate and rate pressure product at different exercise intensities in normotensive humans
Forjaz C.L.M.,Matsudaira Y.,Rodrigues F.B.,Nunes N.
Brazilian Journal of Medical and Biological Research , 1998,
Abstract: To evaluate the effect of exercise intensity on post-exercise cardiovascular responses, 12 young normotensive subjects performed in a randomized order three cycle ergometer exercise bouts of 45 min at 30, 50 and 80% of VO2peak, and 12 subjects rested for 45 min in a non-exercise control trial. Blood pressure (BP) and heart rate (HR) were measured for 20 min prior to exercise (baseline) and at intervals of 5 to 30 (R5-30), 35 to 60 (R35-60) and 65 to 90 (R65-90) min after exercise. Systolic, mean, and diastolic BP after exercise were significantly lower than baseline, and there was no difference between the three exercise intensities. After exercise at 30% of VO2peak, HR was significantly decreased at R35-60 and R65-90. In contrast, after exercise at 50 and 80% of VO2peak, HR was significantly increased at R5-30 and R35-60, respectively. Exercise at 30% of VO2peak significantly decreased rate pressure (RP) product (RP = HR x systolic BP) during the entire recovery period (baseline = 7930 ± 314 vs R5-30 = 7150 ± 326, R35-60 = 6794 ± 349, and R65-90 = 6628 ± 311, P<0.05), while exercise at 50% of VO2peak caused no change, and exercise at 80% of VO2peak produced a significant increase at R5-30 (7468 ± 267 vs 9818 ± 366, P<0.05) and no change at R35-60 or R65-90. Cardiovascular responses were not altered during the control trial. In conclusion, varying exercise intensity from 30 to 80% of VO2peak in young normotensive humans did not influence the magnitude of post-exercise hypotension. However, in contrast to exercise at 50 and 80% of VO2peak, exercise at 30% of VO2peak decreased post-exercise HR and RP.
The rate pressure product is greater during supine cycle ergometry than during treadmill running
SR Simonson,FB Wyatt
Biology of Sport , 2003,
Abstract: Supine cycle ergometry (SCE) is used to assess cardiopulmonary fitness and reserves and to predict potential cardiopulmonary complications of cardiac patients and those undergoing abdominal and non-cardiac thoracic surgery. It is also used to simulate exercise during spaceflight. The question arises as to how SCE compares to upright treadmill running (TMR). The purposes were: 1) to compare oxygen uptake, heart rate, blood pressure, and work of the heart (rate-pressure product, RPP) obtained during maximal bouts of SCE and TMR exercise; 2) to compare these parameters at similar oxygen uptakes during SCE and TMR; and 3) to establish a formula for predicting TMR performance based on SCE. Nine males, ages 21-35 years (x =27.44 yr) completed the Bruce TMR and a ramped SCE protocol to determine device specific peak oxygen uptake. Respiratory gasses and volumes, heart rate, blood pressure, and rating of perceived exertion were measured. Oxygen uptake, RPP, mean arterial pressure, parameter means and standard errors were calculated and a paired t-test (P≤0.05) performed. Absolute and relative peak oxygen uptake and peak heart rates were greater for TMR. SCE produced higher values for systolic, diastolic, and mean arterial pressures, and RPP. Although TMR produces greater systemic stress, SCE causes the greatest exertion by the heart. RPP should be used for evaluation and prescription of exercise rather than HR or BP alone. Increased wall motion abnormalities and ischemic events noted during supine exercise may be due to the heart working harder as well as to better imaging capabilities.
Respostas cardiovasculares agudas de três protocolos de exercício resistido em idosas
Silva, Rodrigo Pereira da;Novaes, Jefferson da Silva;Oliveira, Ricardo Jacó de;Camilo, Flávio de Jesus;Marques, Martim Francisco Bottaro;
Revista Brasileira de Cineantropometria & Desempenho Humano , 2010, DOI: 10.5007/1980-0037.2010v12n2p112
Abstract: acute cardiovascular responses to different high-velocity resistance exercise protocols were compared in untrained older women. twelve apparently healthy volunteers (62.6 ± 2.9 years) performed three different protocols on the bench press (bp) and leg press (lp). all protocols consisted of three sets of 10 repetitions performed with a 10rm load and 2 min of rest between sets. the continuous protocol (cp) consisted of 10 repetitions with no pause between repetitions. the discontinuous protocols were performed with a pause of five (dp5) or 15 (dp15) seconds between the fifth and sixth repetition. heart rate (hr), systolic blood pressure (sbp), and rate pressure product (rpp) were assessed at baseline and at the end of all exercise sets. factorial anova was used to compare the cardiovascular response among different protocols. compared to baseline, hr, sbp and rpp were, respectively, 22.3%, 23.2% and 51.2% (p < 0.05) higher for bp exercise, and 41.7%, 43.0% and 102.9% (p < 0.05) higher for lp exercise after the third set in all protocols. for bp exercise, hr and rpp were 5.6% and 8.2% (p < 0.05) lower in dp5 and dp15, respectively, compared to cp. for lp exercise, hr, sbp and rpp were, respectively, 5.2%, 8.0% and 14.8% lower in dp5 compared to cp. in conclusion, discontinuous high-velocity resistance exercise seems to have a lower cardiovascular demand than continuous resistance exercise in older women.
Respostas cardiovasculares agudas no treinamento de for?a conduzido em exercícios para grandes e pequenos grupamentos musculares
D'Assun??o, Welton;Daltro, Marcelo;Sim?o, Roberto;Polito, Marcos;Monteiro, Walace;
Revista Brasileira de Medicina do Esporte , 2007, DOI: 10.1590/S1517-86922007000200010
Abstract: the aim of this study was to compare the behavior of the systolic blood pressure (sbp); diastolic blood pressure (dbp); heart rate (hr) and double product (dp) during the unilateral performance of three sets of 10rm in two exercises involving distinct muscular groups. eighteen normotense men (22.4 ± 2.7 years; 76.2 ± 9.8 kg; 175.4 ± 6.0 cm) experienced in resisted exercises participated in the study. the volunteers were submitted to the experimental procedure in four non-consecutive days. on the first day, the 10rm tests were applied in the biceps curls with dumbbells (bc) and extensor bench (sb). after 48 hours, a re-test of 10rm was performed. after the loads were obtained, three sets of 10rm were performed in the selected exercises. the performance rhythm in both exercises was controlled by a metronome, with an established time of two seconds for each of the eccentric and concentric phases. the hr was measured though a cardiofrequency meter and the sbp and the dbp through the auscultatory method. the two-way anova with repeated measurements, followed by the post-hoc test by tukey did not find differences (p > 0.05) for intra-exercises sbp. therefore, at least in the present study, the muscular mass involved in the strength training did not influence the acute cardiovascular responses in trained normotensive subjects.
Respostas cardiovasculares agudas ao exercício de for?a realizado em três diferentes formas de execu??o
Monteiro, Walace David;Souza, Denis Alves de;Rodrigues, Maurício Nunes;Farinatti, Paulo de Tarso Veras;
Revista Brasileira de Medicina do Esporte , 2008, DOI: 10.1590/S1517-86922008000200002
Abstract: the pattern of execution can influence the acute cardiovascular responses during exercise. the study observed the heart rate (hr), systolic blood pressure (sbp), and double product (dp) during leg extension executed in three different ways - single-leg (sl), double-leg (dl) and alternate (al). ten healthy volunteers (28 ± 5 years-old) performed three bouts of 10 maximum repetitions of each execution pattern, with a two min interval between sets. the sessions for sl, dl, and al were held at different days, with a 24 h interval. the results for the observed variables in each execution pattern and bout were respectively: hr1=108.6 vs 117.3 vs 110.9; hr2=120.0 vs 130.1 vs 130.0; hr=125.3 vs 137.1 vs 135.2; sbp1=143.8 vs 150.0 vs 144.8; sbp2=155.8 vs 159.6 vs 158.8; sbp3=159.6 vs 166.0 vs 164.8; dp1=15609.8 vs 17873.4 vs 16246.6; dp3=20016.8 vs 23175.2 vs 22572.0. there were no significant differences between the execution patterns in each bout. after the 2nd bout, the absolute hr and dp responses were higher for al and sl, in comparison with dl. we conclude that the execution pattern did not significantly influence the acute cardiovascular responses. however, higher responses were systematically observed for the al and sl patterns in a multiple series design. this information should be taken into account in programs aimed at subjects with cardiovascular disease.
THE PHYSIOLOGICAL RESPONSES OF CHRONIC HEART FAILURE PATIENTS TO MAXIMAL STRENGTH TEST AND A BALKE INCREMENTAL TEST
Itamar Levinger,Roger Bronks,David V. Cody,Ian Linton
Journal of Sports Science and Medicine , 2004,
Abstract: It has been demonstrated that resistance exercises may improve chronic heart failure (CHF) patients' functional ability and quality of life, however, physicians do not recommend this form of exercise because of a concern for reported increases in afterload and blood pressure (BP) during the exercise. This study compared the heart rate (HR), BP and rate pressure product (RPP) of CHF patients for a Balke incremental test and a maximal strength test (MS). Fifteen men diagnosed with CHF participated in the study. All subjects performed both a Balke incremental test and MS test for eight different resistance exercises. The subjects' HR and BP were monitored during the incremental test and immediately after each resistance exercise. HR, systolic BP and RPP were significantly lower during the MS test than during both the peak Balke incremental test and during exercise at 80% of peak VO2 (p < 0.05). No significant RPP differences were found between upper and lower body resistance exercises (p > 0.05). The physiological responses in this study were less severe during a MS test than those reported during an incremental Balke treadmill test. Also the finding suggests that MS tests may be an acceptable method to assess the maximal strength of patients with moderate heart failure.
HEMODYNAMIC AND LACTIC ACID RESPONSES TO PROPRIOCEPTIVE NEUROMUSCULAR FACILITATION EXERCISE
Zuhal Gültekin,Ayse Kin-Isler,?zgür Sürenk?k
Journal of Sports Science and Medicine , 2006,
Abstract: The hemodynamic and metabolic responses to proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation (PNF) exercise were examined in 32 male university students (aged 19-28 years). Ten repetitions of PNF exercises were applied to the subjects' dominant upper extremities in the following order: as an agonist pattern flexion, adduction and external rotation; and as an antagonist pattern extension, abduction and internal rotation. Heart rate (HR), systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP), double product (DP), and blood lactate concentration (La) were determined before, immediately after, and at 1st, 3rd, and 5th minutes after PNF exercise. A one-way ANOVA with repeated measures indicated significant differences in HR, SBP, DBP, DP and La immediately after PNF exercise. HR increased from 81 (±10) to 108 (±15) b·min-1 (p < 0.01), SBP increased from 117 (±10) to 125 (±11) mmHg (p < 0.01), DBP increased from 71 (±10) to 75 (±8) mmHg (p < 0.01), DP increased from 96 (±16) to 135 (±24) (p < 0.01), and La increased from 0.69 (±0.31) to 3.99 (±14.63) mmol·L-1 (p < 0.01). Thus PNF exercise resulted in increased hemodynamic responses and blood lactate concentration that indicate a high strain on the cardiovascular system and anaerobic metabolism in healthy subjects
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