oalib

Publish in OALib Journal

ISSN: 2333-9721

APC: Only $99

Submit

Any time

2019 ( 149 )

2018 ( 371 )

2017 ( 385 )

2016 ( 422 )

Custom range...

Search Results: 1 - 10 of 211143 matches for " Rachel L Redler "
All listed articles are free for downloading (OA Articles)
Page 1 /211143
Display every page Item
Serotonin-Induced Hypersensitivity via Inhibition of Catechol O-Methyltransferase Activity
Douglas Tsao, Jeffrey S Wieskopf, Naim Rashid, Robert E Sorge, Rachel L Redler, Samantha K Segall, Jeffrey S Mogil, William Maixner, Nikolay V Dokholyan, Luda Diatchenko
Molecular Pain , 2012, DOI: 10.1186/1744-8069-8-25
Abstract:
From interventions to interactions: Science Museum Arts Projects’ history and the challenges of interpreting art in the Science Museum
Hannah Redler
JCOM : Journal of Science Communication , 2009,
Abstract: Hannah Redler’s paper examines the 13 year history of Science Museum, London’s contemporary art programme and explores how changing cultural conditions and the changing function of museums are making the questions raised by bringing art into the Science Museum context increasingly significant. It looks at how Science Museum Arts Projects started as a quirky, experimental sideline aimed at shaking up the Museum and its visitors’ assumptions, but has now become a fundamental means by which the Science Museum chooses to represent the impact of science, medicine, engineering and technology on peoples’ everyday lives.
Non-classical immunology
Rachel L Allen
Genome Biology , 2001, DOI: 10.1186/gb-2001-2-2-reports4004
Abstract: This large annual immunology meeting covered a wide range of subjects from biochemical protein characterizations to cell biology and the study of complex disease pathologies. One particularly interesting session covered the emerging field of non-classical major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules. A great deal of attention is now focused on defining the expression, structure and ligands of these proteins, as recent research has indicated that they are involved in both innate and adaptive immunological responses. Heat shock proteins are another group of molecules that appear to have a wide range of immunostimulatory and regulatory effects; a one-day session covered recent advances in our understanding of the immunological roles of heat shock proteins as well as their potential therapeutic uses. Moving on from individual protein families, speakers in the plenary session discussed the complex dynamics of lymphocyte activation, cell-cell interactions and protein translocation.MHC molecules are expressed on most cell types and are responsible for presenting antigens to cells of the immune system. MHC class I molecules present mainly peptides derived from intracellular proteins, while class II molecules present peptides derived from extracellular proteins that have been internalized into the cell. Peptide presentation by MHC class I proteins is one of the best studied aspects of molecular immunology. The human MHC encodes several additional class-I-like proteins including HLA-E, HLA-F and HLA-G. These so-called 'non-classical class I molecules' are similar in sequence and structure to MHC class I molecules but do not show the striking polymorphism seen for their classical relatives and may be encoded outside the MHC. They have only recently come into their own, partly due to their emerging role in natural cytotoxicity, which is mediated by natural killer (NK) cells.Paul Travers (Anthony Nolan Research Institute, London, UK) explained how non-classical class
Essays on David Hume, Medical Men and the Scottish Enlightenment: 'Industry, Knowledge and Humanity'
Rachel L. Dunn
Aestimatio : Critical Reviews in the History of Science , 2009,
Abstract:
Pharmacological Treatment of Major Depressive Disorder in Adolescents
Rachel L. Farley
The Scientific World Journal , 2005, DOI: 10.1100/tsw.2005.55
Abstract:
Branch length estimation and divergence dating: estimates of error in Bayesian and maximum likelihood frameworks
Rachel S Schwartz, Rachel L Mueller
BMC Evolutionary Biology , 2010, DOI: 10.1186/1471-2148-10-5
Abstract: The accuracy of branch length estimation varied with branch length, dataset size (both number of taxa and sites), branch length heterogeneity, branch depth, dataset complexity, and analytical framework. For simple phylogenies analyzed in a Bayesian framework, branches were increasingly underestimated as branch length increased; in a maximum likelihood framework, longer branch lengths were somewhat overestimated. Longer datasets improved estimates in both frameworks; however, when the number of taxa was increased, estimation accuracy for deeper branches was less than for tip branches. Increasing the complexity of the dataset produced more misestimated branches in a Bayesian framework; however, in an ML framework, more branches were estimated more accurately. Using ML branch length estimates to re-estimate plethodontid salamander divergence dates generally resulted in an increase in the estimated age of older nodes and a decrease in the estimated age of younger nodes.Branch lengths are misestimated in both statistical frameworks for simulations of simple datasets. However, for complex datasets, length estimates are quite accurate in ML (even for short datasets), whereas few branches are estimated accurately in a Bayesian framework. Our reanalysis of empirical data demonstrates the magnitude of effects of Bayesian branch length misestimation on divergence date estimates. Because the length of branches for empirical datasets can be estimated most reliably in an ML framework when branches are <1 substitution/site and datasets are ≥1 kb, we suggest that divergence date estimates using datasets, branch lengths, and/or analytical techniques that fall outside of these parameters should be interpreted with caution.One of the major goals of phylogenetic systematics is to accurately estimate divergence dates among species and clades [1]. In addition to determining the timing of species' emergences [e.g. [2]], studies of divergence dates across a range of taxa have revolutionize
Is Age-related Decline in Vocal Emotion Identification an Artefact of Labelling Cognitions?
Rachel L. C. Mitchell,Rachel A. Kingston
International Journal of Psychological Studies , 2011, DOI: 10.5539/ijps.v3n2p156
Abstract: Evidence has emerged that older adults find it more difficult to interpret prosodic emotions than younger adults. However, typical tasks involve labelling-related cognitions over and above emotion perception per se. Accordingly, we aimed to determine if age-related difficulty in prosodic emotion labelling extended to discrimination, which is more closely related to emotion perception per se. For this purpose, 45 younger adults (mean age 20 years, 2 males/43 females) and 45 older adults (mean age 71 years, 16 males/29 females) were recruited. In one task, participants heard pairs of sentences and were asked to indicate whether they were spoken with the same emotional intonational or not. In a second task, they heard sentences with intonation conveying a question or statement, and indicated whether the non-emotional intonation patterns matched or not. Older adults’ performance consistently fell below that of younger adults. Older adults may have a generic prosodic decoding deficit, regardless of the end function of the prosody.
Gain in Student Understanding of the Role of Random Variation in Evolution Following Teaching Intervention Based on Luria-Delbruck Experiment
Rachel L. Robson,Susan Burns
Journal of Microbiology & Biology Education , 2011, DOI: 10.1128/jmbe.v12i1.272
Abstract: Undergraduate students in introductory biology classes are typically saddled with pre-existing popular beliefs that impede their ability to learn about biological evolution. One of the most common misconceptions about evolution is that the environment causes advantageous mutations, rather than the correct view that mutations occur randomly and the environment only selects for mutants with advantageous traits. In this study, a significant gain in student understanding of the role of randomness in evolution was observed after students participated in an inquiry-based pedagogical intervention based on the Luria-Delbruck experiment. Questionnaires with isomorphic questions regarding environmental selection among random mutants were administered to study participants (N = 82) in five separate sections of a sophomore-level microbiology class before and after the teaching intervention. Demographic data on each participant was also collected, in a way that preserved anonymity. Repeated measures analysis showed that post-test scores were significantly higher than pre-test scores with regard to the questions about evolution (F(1, 77) = 25.913, p < 0.001). Participants' pre-existing beliefs about evolution had no significant effect on gain in understanding of this concept. This study indicates that conducting and discussing an experiment about phage resistance in E. coli may improve student understanding of the role of stochastic events in evolution more broadly, as post-test answers showed that students were able to apply the lesson of the Luria-Delbruck experiment to other organisms subjected to other kinds of selection.
OASIS4 – a coupling software for next generation earth system modelling
R. Redler, S. Valcke,H. Ritzdorf
Geoscientific Model Development (GMD) & Discussions (GMDD) , 2010, DOI: 10.5194/gmd-3-87-2010
Abstract: In this article we present a new version of the Ocean Atmosphere Sea Ice Soil coupling software (OASIS4). With this new fully parallel OASIS4 coupler we target the needs of Earth system modelling in its full complexity. The primary focus of this article is to describe the design of the OASIS4 software and how the coupling software drives the whole coupled model system ensuring the synchronization of the different component models. The application programmer interface (API) manages the coupling exchanges between arbitrary climate component models, as well as the input and output from and to files of each individual component. The OASIS4 Transformer instance performs the parallel interpolation and transfer of the coupling data between source and target model components. As a new core technology for the software, the fully parallel search algorithm of OASIS4 is described in detail. First benchmark results are discussed with simple test configurations to demonstrate the efficiency and scalability of the software when applied to Earth system model components. Typically the compute time needed to perform the search is in the order of a few seconds and is only weakly dependant on the grid size.
OASIS4 – a coupling software for next generation earth system modelling
R. Redler,S. Valcke,H. Ritzdorf
Geoscientific Model Development Discussions , 2009,
Abstract: In this article we present a new version of the Ocean Atmosphere Sea Ice Soil coupling software (OASIS4). With this new fully parallel OASIS4 coupler we target the needs of Earth system modelling in its full complexity. The primary focus of this article is to describe the design of the OASIS4 software and how the coupling software drives the whole coupled model system ensuring the synchronization of the different component models. The application programmer interface (API) manages the coupling exchanges between arbitrary climate component models, as well as the input and output from and to files of each individual component. The OASIS4 Transformer instance performs the parallel interpolation and transfer of the coupling data between source and target model components. As a new core technology for the software, the fully parallel search algorithm of OASIS4 is described in detail. First benchmark results are discussed with simple test configurations to demonstrate the efficiency and scalability of the software when applied to Earth system model components. Typically the compute time needed in order to perform the search is in the order of a few seconds and is only weakly dependant on the grid size.
Page 1 /211143
Display every page Item


Home
Copyright © 2008-2017 Open Access Library. All rights reserved.