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Search Results: 1 - 10 of 473199 matches for " Pierre A Morris "
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An unusual presentation of adenoid cystic carcinoma of the minor salivary glands with cranial nerve palsy: a case study
Amal Abdul-Hussein, Pierre A Morris, Tsveti Markova
BMC Cancer , 2007, DOI: 10.1186/1471-2407-7-157
Abstract: A 49-year-old African American female presented to the emergency room complaining of severe right-sided headache, photophobia, dizziness and nausea, with diplopia. The patient had a 14 year history migraine headaches, hypertension, and mild intermittent asthma. Physical examination revealed right lateral rectus muscle palsy with esotropia. There was numbness in all three divisions of the right trigeminal nerve. Motor and sensory examination of extremities was normal. An MRI of the brain/brain stem was obtained which showed a large mass in the clivus extending to involve the nasopharynx, pterygoid plate, sphenoid and right cavernous sinuses.Biopsy showed an ACC tumor with a cribriform pattern of the minor salivary glands. The patient underwent total gross surgical resection and radiation therapy.This is a case of ACC of the minor salivary glands with intracranial invasion. The patient had long history of headaches which changed in character during the past year, and symptoms of acute 5th and 6th cranial nerve involvement. Our unique case demonstrates direct invasion of cavernous sinus and could explain the 5th and 6th cranial nerve involvement as histopathology revealed no perineural invasion.Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma (ACC) is a rare tumor entity and comprises about 1% of all malignant tumor of the oral and maxillofacial region [1]. It is a slowly growing but highly invasive cancer with high recurrence rate. Lymphatic spread to local lymph nodes is rare. Hematogenous spread, however, occurs often in the course of the disease [2]. Intracranial ACC even is more rare and has been reported as 4 – 22% of ACC [3]. It could be primary or secondary which could occur either by direct invasion like in our case, hematogenous spread, or perineural spread [4,5]. Perineural spread of ACC has long been recognized. The literature revealed that the region of Gasserian ganglion to be the most common site of involvement (35.8%) [2,3,6,7], while cavernous sinus was involved in 15.1% [3-5
Vitamin D, Testosterone, Epigenetics and Pain an Evolving Concept of Neurosignaling, Neuroplasticity and Homeostasis  [PDF]
Joseph Thomas, Pierre Morris, Eric Seigel
World Journal of Neuroscience (WJNS) , 2018, DOI: 10.4236/wjns.2018.82019
Abstract: The thought of exploring a possible relationship between the broad systems of steroid hormone physiology (specifically vitamin D and testosterone) and nocioception was prompted by an unexpectedly frequent personal clinical observation. Patients with chronic pain syndromes or chronic musculoskeletal pain often have low serum levels of vitamin D and testos-terone. Mining for relevant information in Pub Med, Medline and Cochrane Systems Review, three concepts repeatedly emerge that provide a common context for understanding the mechanics of these diverse sys-tems—epigenetic, homeostasis and neuroplasticity. Viewing homeostasis within the framework of epigenetics allows reasoned speculation as to how various human systems interact to maintain integrity and function, while simultaneously responding in a plastic manner to external stimuli. Cell signaling supports normal function by regulating synaptic activity, but can also effect plastic change in the central and peripheral nervous system. This is most commonly achieved by post-translational remodeling of chromatin. There is thus persistent epigenetic change in protein synthesis with all the related downstream effects but without disruption of normal DNA se-quencing. In itself, this may be considered an example of genomic homeo-stasis. Epigenetic mechanisms in nociception and analgesia are active in the paleospinothalamic and neospinothalamic tracts at all levels. Physiologic response to a nociceptive insult, whether mechanical, inflammatory or ischemic, is provided by cell signaling that is significantly enhanced through epigenetic mechanisms at work in nociceptors, Gamma-Aminobutyric Acid (GABA) and glutamate receptors, voltage gated receptors, higher order neurons in the various dorsal horn laminae and proximal nociceptive pro-cessing centers in the brainstem and cortex. The mediators of these direct or epigenetic effects are various ligands also active in signaling, such as free radicals, substance P, a variety of cytokines, growth factors and G proteins, stress responsive proteins, matrix and structural proteins such as reelin and the Jmjd3 gene/enzyme. Calcitriol, the vitamin D receptor and vitamin D Responsive Elements collectively determine regulatory effects of this secosteroid hormone. Agents of homeostasis and plasticity include various D-system specific cytochrome enzymes (CYP 24, CYP 27 A1, B1), as well as more widely active enzymes and protein cell signalers (Jmjd3, Calbindin, BMP), many of which play a role in the nociceptive system. While the highlighted information represents an
A Biologist’s View of Creation  [PDF]
James A. Morris
Open Journal of Philosophy (OJPP) , 2019, DOI: 10.4236/ojpp.2019.91002
Abstract: A model of the Universe is proposed in which three-dimensional space consists of positive and negative charges which are exactly equal and opposite. The charges are separated by a distance d, which is a random variable of the order of 0.1 nm. The charges are produce by continuous creation from nothing and the Universe doubles in volume every 2 to 3 billion years. Vast tracts of space move relative to each other and they meet whirlpools that are produced in which the charges are forced together producing protons and neutrons. Each proton and each neutron consume a pair of charges every 917 seconds and this creates the force of gravity in which space physically contracts around large objects. This concept of gravity is consistent with Newton’s and Einstein’s equations and allows one to visualize curved space and space-time. Focal areas in which the charges are ordered create information and energy. Electromagnetic radiation is a wave of energy in which order forms at the front and dissolves at the rear. Large objects move in a straight line because their electrons order adjacent space and the object moves with a surrounding wave. The quantum world and the world of large objects are not dissimilar and we can construct physical models of the Universe that all intelligent humans can understand. This includes a physical understanding of Schrodinger’s equation and its parameters. Everything in the Universe is composed ultimately of positive and negative charges, which can be combined in an infinite number of ways. This applies to abstract concepts as well as concrete objects. The only difference is that the former is four dimensional and involves complex information flow. Thus human consciousness, behavior, religious beliefs and spiritual experience are just as real and susceptible to scientific study as are anatomy and physiology.
Benign Fibrous Histiocytoma of the Neurocranium  [PDF]
Chrisovalantis A. Tsimiklis, Tom Morris
Neuroscience & Medicine (NM) , 2013, DOI: 10.4236/nm.2013.44038
Abstract:

Presented is a case of benign fibrous histiocytoma (BFH) involving the calvarium of a 25 years old lady who noticed a depression in her occiput associated with localised pain. Imaging revealed a tumour eroding through the inner and outer skull tables, closely associated with major underlying dural sinuses. She underwent complete macroscopic resection of the tumour and reconstruction of a titanium mesh cranioplasty. Histology favoured a benign process with a diagnosis of BFH of the calvarium given. At 1 year follow-up, the patient is asymptomatic and has not developed recurrence of the tumour.

An economic model of adult hearing screening
A. Morris
Audiology Research , 2011, DOI: 10.4081/audiores.2011.e16
Abstract: Populations are ageing and older adults make an increasing contribution to society, yet uncorrected hearing loss is common over the age of 50 years, increasing in prevalence and severity with age. The consequences of uncorrected hearing loss can be profound for hearing-impaired individuals and their communication partners but there is evidence that adults commonly delay 10-15 years before seeking help for hearing difficulty (Stephens et al., 1990; Davis et al., 2007) and the most common reason is the belief that their hearing is not bad enough (Ipsos-Mori/RNID survey, 2005). Hearing aids are currently the mainstay of intervention for hearing loss; evidence shows benefit to social functioning and quality of life even for mild hearing loss (Mulrow et al., 1990; Chisolm et al., 2007) and long term outcomes are better when they are obtained early (Davis et al., 2007). Screening adults for hearing loss would expedite intervention and reduce unmet need, leading to improved quality of life for many older adults. Previous work suggests adult hearing screening (AHS) should target adults aged 50-65 years, old enough for prevalence to justify screening but young enough to gain from early intervention...
Data Structures in Power System Reliability Estimation
Stella Morris,Morris A.G. Ezra
Journal of Applied Sciences , 2004,
Abstract: In this paper a technique for the estimation of power system reliability using fault tree analysis (FTA) and the concept of data structures is presented. The proposed approach for representing the fault trees uses data structures concept and dynamic storage allocation which overcomes the dimensionality problem. This approach reduces the computational complexity and execution time. This method can efficiently handle systems having any number of cut-sets between the input-output nodes depending upon the available computer memory. Three sample power system networks are considered to test the efficiency of the algorithm developed and the computation times with different approaches are compared.
Osteoporosis Prevention—A Worthy and Achievable Strategy
Howard A. Morris
Nutrients , 2010, DOI: 10.3390/nu2101073
Abstract: This special issue of Nutrients records seven of the presentations made to the very successful meeting titled “Osteoporosis Prevention: A Workshop on Calcium, Vitamin D and other Nutritional Aspects” held in Adelaide, Australia on 5 and 6 March 2010 [1-7]. Seventy six delegates attended from across Australia and New Zealand to review the current evidence that dietary calcium intake, vitamin D status, other nutrients and exercise play a significant role in bone mineral homeostasis and act to prevent the development of osteoporosis. The Workshop promoted the concept that osteoporosis is a predictable and preventable disease and that significant benefit would be achieved to reduce the incidence of osteoporosis and the risk of fractures from nutrition and life style activities. Such an achievement will not only save considerable pain, suffering and morbidity but will also have a major financial benefit for the healthcare system for which the cost of treatment for osteoporotic fractures already amounts to billions of dollars.
Zuckerman versus Marais: a primatological collision
A. G. Morris
South African Journal of Science , 2010, DOI: 10.4102/sajs.v105i5/6.97
Abstract: The Afrikaans poet and writer Eugène Marais is well known in South Africa but not elsewhere. The publication of his The Soul of the Ape in 1969 triggered a hard hitting response from the British primatologist Solly Zuckerman, in which he attacked Marais’ writings and rejected him as a legitimate scientist. The two never met and Marais had been dead for nearly 40 years when Zuckerman’s attack took place. This paper examines the basis for Zuckerman’s attack and looks at the context of both men, especially in the light of Zuckerman’s combativeness and Marais’ naivety and lack of scientific rigour.
Can advanced learners of spanish achieve native-like pronunciation? A re-examination of the critical period for accent Can advanced learners of spanish achieve native-like pronunciation? A re-examination of the critical period for accent
Frank A. Morris
Ilha do Desterro , 2008,
Abstract: What is the foundation for the Critical Period Hypothesis?2 For the last thirty years, researchers have pondered whether learners of a second language can achieve native-like pronunciation. The first attempt at addressing the issue occurred in the early 1960’s. To account for the difficulty that some children had in acquiring a first or second language, the Critical Period Hypothesis was proposed (Penfield and Roberts, 1959; Lenneberg, 1967). It was postulated that there is a neurological based critical period, which ends at the onset of puberty. But after the critical period, mastery of a first or second language is no longer possible (Lenneberg, 1967). The cause for the lack of language attainment is attributed to a loss of neural plasticity. As the brain ages, it loses its "plasticity", and thus, its ability to learn languages. It was suggested that language learners who started to acquire a second language before the close of the critical period could achieve nativelike levels, but those who began to learn languages after the end of the critical period would not. What is the foundation for the Critical Period Hypothesis?2 For the last thirty years, researchers have pondered whether learners of a second language can achieve native-like pronunciation. The first attempt at addressing the issue occurred in the early 1960’s. To account for the difficulty that some children had in acquiring a first or second language, the Critical Period Hypothesis was proposed (Penfield and Roberts, 1959; Lenneberg, 1967). It was postulated that there is a neurological based critical period, which ends at the onset of puberty. But after the critical period, mastery of a first or second language is no longer possible (Lenneberg, 1967). The cause for the lack of language attainment is attributed to a loss of neural plasticity. As the brain ages, it loses its "plasticity", and thus, its ability to learn languages. It was suggested that language learners who started to acquire a second language before the close of the critical period could achieve nativelike levels, but those who began to learn languages after the end of the critical period would not.
F-Waves – Physiology and Clinical Uses
Morris A. Fisher
The Scientific World Journal , 2007, DOI: 10.1100/tsw.2007.49
Abstract:
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