oalib

Publish in OALib Journal

ISSN: 2333-9721

APC: Only $99

Submit

Any time

2019 ( 15 )

2018 ( 22 )

2017 ( 21 )

2016 ( 26 )

Custom range...

Search Results: 1 - 10 of 6603 matches for " Philip Lacap "
All listed articles are free for downloading (OA Articles)
Page 1 /6603
Display every page Item
Diversity and Frequencies of HLA Class I and Class II Genes of an East African Population  [PDF]
Trevor A. Peterson, Thomas Bielawny, Philip Lacap, Rae-Anne Hardie, Christina Daniuk, Lillian Mendoza, Subotheni Thavaneswaran, Tony Kariri, Joshua Kimani, Charles Wachihi, Maboku Kimani, Terry Blake Ball, Francis A. Plummer, Ma Luo
Open Journal of Genetics (OJGen) , 2014, DOI: 10.4236/ojgen.2014.42013
Abstract:

Human Leukocyte Antigens (HLAs) play an important role in host immune responses to infectious pathogens, and influence organ transplantation, cancer and autoimmune diseases. In this study we conducted a high resolution, sequence-based genotyping of HLA class I and class II genes of more than 2000 women from Kenya, eastern Tanzania and southern Uganda around Lake Victoria and analyzed their allele, phenotype and haplotype frequencies. A considerable genetic diversity was observed at both class I and II loci. A total of 79 HLA-A, 113 HLA-B, 53 HLA-C, 25 HLA-DPA1, 60 HLA-DPB1, 15 HLA-DQA1, 44 HLA-DQB1 and 38 HLA-DRB1 alleles have been identified. The most common class I alleles were A * 02:01:01 (10.90%), B * 58:02 (8.79%), and C * 06:02:01 (16.98%). The most common class II alleles were DPA1*01:03:01 (40.60%), DPB1 * 01:01:01 (23.45%), DQA1 * 01:02:01 (31.03%), DQB1 * 03:01:01 (21.79%), DRB1 * 11:01:02 (11.65%), DRB3 * 02:02:01 (31.65%), DRB4 * 01:01:01 (10.50%), and DRB5 * 01:01:01 (10.50%). Higher than expected homozygosity was observed at HLA-B (P = 0.022), DQA1 (P = 0.004), DQB1 (P = 0.023), and DRB1 (P = 0.0006) loci. The allele frequency distribution of this population is very similar to the ones observed in other sub-Saharan populations with the exception of lower frequencies of A * 23 (5.55% versus 11.21%) and DQA1 * 03 (4.79% versus 11.72%), and higher frequencies of DPB1 * 30 (2.26% versus 0.37%) and DRB1 * 11 (21.51% versus 15.89%). The knowledge of the diversity and allele/ phenotype frequencies of the HLA alleles of this east African population, can contribute to the understanding of how host genetic factors influence disease susceptibility and effective anti-retroviral treatment of HIV infections and future vaccine trials.

Multilocus sequence analysis of Treponema denticola strains of diverse origin
Mo Sisu,You Meng,Su Yvonne CF,Lacap-Bugler Donnabella C
BMC Microbiology , 2013, DOI: 10.1186/1471-2180-13-24
Abstract: Background The oral spirochete bacterium Treponema denticola is associated with both the incidence and severity of periodontal disease. Although the biological or phenotypic properties of a significant number of T. denticola isolates have been reported in the literature, their genetic diversity or phylogeny has never been systematically investigated. Here, we describe a multilocus sequence analysis (MLSA) of 20 of the most highly studied reference strains and clinical isolates of T. denticola; which were originally isolated from subgingival plaque samples taken from subjects from China, Japan, the Netherlands, Canada and the USA. Results The sequences of the 16S ribosomal RNA gene, and 7 conserved protein-encoding genes (flaA, recA, pyrH, ppnK, dnaN, era and radC) were successfully determined for each strain. Sequence data was analyzed using a variety of bioinformatic and phylogenetic software tools. We found no evidence of positive selection or DNA recombination within the protein-encoding genes, where levels of intraspecific sequence polymorphism varied from 18.8% (flaA) to 8.9% (dnaN). Phylogenetic analysis of the concatenated protein-encoding gene sequence data (ca. 6,513 nucleotides for each strain) using Bayesian and maximum likelihood approaches indicated that the T. denticola strains were monophyletic, and formed 6 well-defined clades. All analyzed T. denticola strains appeared to have a genetic origin distinct from that of ‘Treponema vincentii’ or Treponema pallidum. No specific geographical relationships could be established; but several strains isolated from different continents appear to be closely related at the genetic level. Conclusions Our analyses indicate that previous biological and biophysical investigations have predominantly focused on a subset of T. denticola strains with a relatively narrow range of genetic diversity. Our methodology and results establish a genetic framework for the discrimination and phylogenetic analysis of T. denticola isolates, which will greatly assist future biological and epidemiological investigations involving this putative ‘periodontopathogen’.
Reducing consumption to avert catastrophic global climate change: The case of aviation  [PDF]
Philip Cafaro
Natural Science (NS) , 2013, DOI: 10.4236/ns.2013.51A016
Abstract:

Avoiding potentially catastrophic global climate change is a moral imperative, demanding significant reductions in greenhouse gas emissions from all important transport sectors, including aviation. However, because passenger flights and freight traffic are increasing much faster than efficiency improvements, the aviation sector will not be able to reduce emissions, or even stabilize them at current levels, without direct, forceful action to reduce demand. This paper reviews the ethical principles and empirical realities supporting the case for reducing worldwide aviation traffic. It argues that most passenger air travel and air freight shipping represents unnecessary luxury consumption, which responsible moral agents should willingly reduce in order to mitigate global climate change. It considers several mechanisms for doing so, and contends that they may succeed, but only if combined with an explicit recognition and binding commitment that for the foreseeable future, aviation must be a slow-growth or no-growth sector of the world economy.

Linking Regional Science and Urban Economics: Long-Run Interactions among Preferences for Amenities and Public Goods  [PDF]
Philip E. Philip E. Graves
Modern Economy (ME) , 2012, DOI: 10.4236/me.2012.33035
Abstract: The linked nature of long-term patterns of urban deconcentration and regional change (from rustbelt to sunbelt in the U.S., but with similar phenomena increasingly world-wide) is analyzed in a framework that emphasizes heterogeneous human preferences. The focus is on the important interactions that exist between local and regional amenities, whether exogenous or endogenous. The central thesis is that persistent exogenous amenity variation among regions provides an underlying pattern of regional growth and decline. However, inappropriate provision of local public goods in central cities is seen to lead both to non-optimally large levels of suburbanization and to rates of regional change that are also non-optimally large.
Economic Growth and Business Cycles: The Labor Supply Decision with Two Types of Technological Progress  [PDF]
Philip E. Graves
Modern Economy (ME) , 2011, DOI: 10.4236/me.2011.23033
Abstract: An informal model is described that leads to multiple macroeconomic equilibria as a consequence of random variation in the relative amounts of technological change for new and existing goods. The novel observation is that the rate of introduction and market penetration of new goods (sometimes called product innovation) vis-à-vis technological advance for existing goods (sometimes called process innovation) importantly affects the labor supply decision. A relatively rapid influx of new goods will generally increase labor supply, while relatively more technological advance for existing goods will reduce labor supply to the market. These impacts are seen to provide insights into Rostow’s stages of growth. Short run variations in the relative importance of the two types of technological change are seen to imply unpredictable business cycle behavior of the type we observe. The welfare implications of national income accounting that fails to consider changes in leisure are discussed.
Honesty, power and bootstrapping in composite interval quantitative trait locus mapping  [PDF]
Philip M. Service
Open Journal of Genetics (OJGen) , 2013, DOI: 10.4236/ojgen.2013.32016
Abstract:

In a typical composite interval mapping experiment, the probability of obtaining false QTL is likely to be at least an order of magnitude greater than the nominal experiment-wise Type I error rate, as set by permutation test. F2 mapping crosses were simulated with three different genetic maps. Each map contained ten QTL on either three, six or twelve linkage groups. QTL effects were additive only, and heritability was 50%. Each linkage group had 11 evenly-spaced (10 cM) markers. Selective genotyping was used. Simulated data were analyzed by composite interval mapping with the Zmapqtl program of QTL Cartographer. False positives were minimized by using the largest feasible number of markers to control genetic background effects. Bootstrapping was then used to recover mapping power lost to the large number of conditioning markers. Bootstrapping is shown to be a useful tool for QTL discovery, although it can also produce false positives. Quantitative bootstrap support—the proportion of bootstrap replicates in which a significant likelihood maximum occurred in a given marker interval—was positively correlated with the probability that the likelihood maxima revealed a true QTL. X-linked QTL were detected with much lower power than autosomal QTL. It is suggested that QTL mapping experiments should be supported by accompanying simulations that replicate the marker map, crossing design, sample size, and method of analysis used for the actual experiment.

Retail Price Optimization from Sparse Demand Data  [PDF]
Philip Thomas, Alec Chrystal
American Journal of Industrial and Business Management (AJIBM) , 2013, DOI: 10.4236/ajibm.2013.33035
Abstract:

It will be shown how the retailer can use economic theory to exploit the sparse information available to him to set the price of each item he is selling close to its profit-maximizing level. The variability of the maximum price acceptable to each customer is modeled using a probability density for demand, which provides an alternative to the conventional demand curve often employed. This alternative way of interpreting retail demand data provides insights into the optimal price as a central measure of a demand distribution. Modeling individuals variability in their maximum acceptable price using a near-exhaustive set of demand densities, it will be established that the optimal price will be close both to the mean of the underlying demand density and to the mean of the Rectangular distribution fitted to the underlying distribution. An algorithm will then be derived that produces a near-optimal price, whatever the market conditions prevailing, monopoly, oligopoly, monopolistic competition or, in the limiting case, perfect competition, based on the minimum of market testing. The algorithm given for optimizing the retail price, even when demand data are sparse, is shown in worked examples to be accurate and thus of practical use to retail businesses.

Generalized Demand Densities for Retail Price Investigation  [PDF]
Philip Thomas, Alec Chrystal
American Journal of Industrial and Business Management (AJIBM) , 2013, DOI: 10.4236/ajibm.2013.33034
Abstract:

The paper introduces generalized demand densities as a new and effective way of conceptualizing and analyzing retail demand. The demand density is demonstrated to contain the same information as the demand curve conventionally used in economic studies of consumer demand, but the fact that it is a probability density sets bounds on its possible behavior, a feature that may be exploited to allow near-exhaustive testing of possible demand scenarios using candidate demand densities. Four such demand densities are examined in detail. The Household Income demand density is based on the assumption that a persons maximum acceptable price (MAP) for an item is proportional to his household after-tax income. The Double Power demand density allows the mode to be located anywhere in the range between zero and the highest MAP possessed by anyone in the target population. The two-parameter, Rectangular demand density, the simplest model that a retailer may employ, has the useful feature that it may be matched relatively easily to any unimodal demand density and hence may act as its approximate proxy. The Kinked demand density is derived from the kinked demand curve sometimes used as a relatively uncomplicated way of conceptualizing the effects of oligopoly. The central measures of each of these demand densities are derived: mean price, mode, median, optimal and, when appropriate, the mean of the matched Rectangular demand density. In a further result arising from the use of demand densities, it is shown that stable trading at the kink price will not occur if the demand curve is kinked and convex.

A Qualitative Study of the Internal Audit Functions of Two Leading Gaming Corporations: Macau Evidence  [PDF]
Philip Law, Desmond Yuen
Open Journal of Accounting (OJAcct) , 2013, DOI: 10.4236/ojacct.2013.24016
Abstract: As the authors’ request, the paper \"A Qualitative Study of the Internal Audit Functions of Two Leading Gaming Corporations: Macau Evidence\" published in Vol.2, No.4, 110-114, 2013 has been withdrawn from the website.
Explaining the “Buy One Get One Free” Promotion: The Golden Ratio as a Marketing Tool  [PDF]
Philip Thomas, Alec Chrystal
American Journal of Industrial and Business Management (AJIBM) , 2013, DOI: 10.4236/ajibm.2013.38075
Abstract:

Buy-one-get-one-free (BOGOF) promotions are a common feature of retail food markets, but why are they so widespread? The theory of Relative Utility Pricing (RUP) developed in this paper provides an explanation not only for supermarket promotional offers but also for more general pricing of packs of different sizes in supermarkets and on the internet. A clear and simple explanation is given for the two most widely used quantity promotions: BOGOF and 3-for-the-price-of-2. The RUP model may be linked to the theory of iso-elastic utility functions, and this allows the relationships amongst risk-aversion, pack-size ratio and demand elasticity to be explored. “Cautious consumers”, as defined in the paper, are found to be the only sensible target for quantity promotions. It is argued that the needs of cautious consumers of retail commodities will be best addressed if the vendor sets the ratio of successive pack sizes as the square of the Golden Ratio, namely 2.62, and the price-ratio at the Golden Ratio, 1.62. Thus the Golden Ratio may be regarded as a marketing guide for vendors considering both their best interests and those of their customers. This proposition is supported by an analysis showing that higher profits are more likely to come from Golden Ratio sizing than from either BOGOF or 3-for-2 when variable costs lie in most of the upper half of the range that is required for any of these multibuy offers to generate profit. The paper’s theoretical predictions for both pack sizes and prices are supported by examples from the retail sector: grocery, paperback books and electronics.

Page 1 /6603
Display every page Item


Home
Copyright © 2008-2017 Open Access Library. All rights reserved.