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Search Results: 1 - 10 of 32371 matches for " Peter Piot "
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Squaring the Circle: AIDS, Poverty, and Human Development
Peter Piot,Robert Greener,Sarah Russell
PLOS Medicine , 2007, DOI: 10.1371/journal.pmed.0040314
Abstract:
International response to the HIV/AIDS epidemic: planning for success
Piot,Peter; Coll Seck,Awa Marie;
Bulletin of the World Health Organization , 2001, DOI: 10.1590/S0042-96862001001200006
Abstract: more assertive political leadership in the global response to aids in both poor and rich countries culminated in june 2001 at the un general assembly special session on aids. delegates made important commitments there, and endorsed a global strategy framework for shifting the dynamics of the epidemic by simultaneously reducing risk, vulnerability and impact. this points the way to achievable progress in the fight against hiv/aids. evidence of success in tackling the spread of aids comes from diverse programme areas, including work with sex workers and clients, injecting drug users, and young people. it also comes from diverse countries, including india, the russian federation, senegal, thailand, the united republic of tanzania, and zambia. their common feature is the combination of focused approaches with attention to the societywide context within which risk occurs. similarly, building synergies between prevention and care has underpinned success in brazil and holds great potential for sub-saharan africa, where 90% reductions have been achieved in the prices at which antiretroviral drugs are available. success also involves overcoming stigma, which undermines community action and blocks access to services. work against stigma and discrimination has been effectively carried out in both health sector and occupational settings. accompanying attention to the conditions for success against hiv/aids is global consensus on the need for additional resources. the detailed estimate of required aids spending in low- and middle-income countries is us$ 9.2 billion annually, compared to the $ 2 billion currently spent. additional spending should be mobilized by the new global fund to fight aids, tuberculosis and malaria, but needs to be joined by additional government and private efforts within countries, including from debt relief. commitment and capacity to scale up hiv prevention and care have never been stronger. the moment must be seized to prevent a global catastrophe.
Redesigning the AIDS response for long-term impact
Larson,Heidi J; Bertozzi,Stefano; Piot,Peter;
Bulletin of the World Health Organization , 2011, DOI: 10.1590/S0042-96862011001100015
Abstract: three decades since the human immunodeficiency virus (hiv) was identified, the pandemic of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (aids) has developed into diverse epidemics around the world. in many populations, hiv infection has become endemic. while there is good progress on expanding access to treatment, with an estimated 6.6 million people on antiretroviral therapy at the end of 2010, prevention efforts are still highly inadequate with 2.6 million new infections occurring in 2009. demand for treatment is increasing while funding is becoming more scarce and activism is waning. in 2007, the joint united nations programme on hiv/aids (unaids) established an independent forum called aids2031 to take a critical look at the global hiv/aids response. this paper outlines four key areas for a redesigned aids response based on the deliberations of this initiative and on the learning and experience of the first three decades of the epidemic: (i) a new culture of knowledge generation and utilization; (ii) transformed prevention and treatment to increase effectiveness; (iii) increased efficiency through better management and maximizing synergies with other programmes; and (iv) investment for the long term. across all these areas is a strong emphasis on local capacity building, leadership, programme priorities and budgets.
International response to the HIV/AIDS epidemic: planning for success
Piot Peter,Coll Seck Awa Marie
Bulletin of the World Health Organization , 2001,
Abstract: More assertive political leadership in the global response to AIDS in both poor and rich countries culminated in June 2001 at the UN General Assembly Special Session on AIDS. Delegates made important commitments there, and endorsed a global strategy framework for shifting the dynamics of the epidemic by simultaneously reducing risk, vulnerability and impact. This points the way to achievable progress in the fight against HIV/AIDS. Evidence of success in tackling the spread of AIDS comes from diverse programme areas, including work with sex workers and clients, injecting drug users, and young people. It also comes from diverse countries, including India, the Russian Federation, Senegal, Thailand, the United Republic of Tanzania, and Zambia. Their common feature is the combination of focused approaches with attention to the societywide context within which risk occurs. Similarly, building synergies between prevention and care has underpinned success in Brazil and holds great potential for sub-Saharan Africa, where 90% reductions have been achieved in the prices at which antiretroviral drugs are available. Success also involves overcoming stigma, which undermines community action and blocks access to services. Work against stigma and discrimination has been effectively carried out in both health sector and occupational settings. Accompanying attention to the conditions for success against HIV/AIDS is global consensus on the need for additional resources. The detailed estimate of required AIDS spending in low- and middle-income countries is US$ 9.2 billion annually, compared to the $ 2 billion currently spent. Additional spending should be mobilized by the new global fund to fight AIDS, tuberculosis and malaria, but needs to be joined by additional government and private efforts within countries, including from debt relief. Commitment and capacity to scale up HIV prevention and care have never been stronger. The moment must be seized to prevent a global catastrophe.
Informing the 2011 UN Session on Noncommunicable Diseases: Applying Lessons from the AIDS Response
Peter Lamptey,Michael Merson,Peter Piot,K. Srinath Reddy,Rebecca Dirks
PLOS Medicine , 2011, DOI: 10.1371/journal.pmed.1001086
Abstract:
AIDS in Africa: an epidemiologic paradigm
Quinn Thomas C.,Mann Jonathan M.,Curran James W.,Piot Peter
Bulletin of the World Health Organization , 2001,
Abstract:
Tackling Non-Communicable Diseases In Low- and Middle-Income Countries: Is the Evidence from High-Income Countries All We Need?
Shah Ebrahim ,Neil Pearce,Liam Smeeth,Juan P. Casas,Shabbar Jaffar,Peter Piot
PLOS Medicine , 2013, DOI: 10.1371/journal.pmed.1001377
Abstract:
Quels indicateurs pour mesurer le développement professionnel dans les métiers adressés à autrui ?
Thierry Piot
Questions Vives : Recherches en éducation , 2011, DOI: 10.4000/questionsvives.622
Abstract: Cet article propose des indicateurs destinés à mesurer le développement professionnel dans les métiers adressés à autrui. La première partie s’intéresse à la genèse de la notion de développement professionnel, issue de la rationalisation induite par la seconde modernité ; elle indique que les métiers adressés à autrui sont tenus d’articuler une rationalisation forte et une rationalisation faible. Puis, nous présentons le cadre de la didactique professionnelle, particulièrement pertinent pour s’intéresser à l’analyse du travail d’interaction humaine et mettre au jour ses dilemmes. à partir d’une recherche empirique concernant des formateurs d’une école d’aides-soignants, nous proposons, à partir d’une lecture plurielle qui prend en compte les compétences et l’identité professionnelle, cinq indicateurs qui sont l’objet d’un traitement afin d’être comparables, car c’est la cohérence entre les informations recueillies qui nous para t rendre le mieux compte, malgré les limites, de la notion de développement professionnel dans les métiers adressés à autrui. What indicators should be used to measure professional development in non-teaching support occupations? This article proposes the use of indicators in these occupations. The first part considers the origin of the concept of professional development, coming from the rationalisation caused by the “second modernity”. This part indicates that these occupations are linked to both a strong and a weak rationalisation. The second part presents the framework for professional development that is particularly relevant to the analysis of social interaction and the updating its dilemmas. Starting from empirical research involving the trainers at a school for care assistants, five indicators are proposed for the competencies and professional identity that are sufficiently comparable for the best generalisations, despite all limitations, to support occupations.
Attitudes and Acceptance of Oral and Parenteral HIV Preexposure Prophylaxis among Potential User Groups: A Multinational Study
Andreas B. Eisingerich, Ana Wheelock, Gabriela B. Gomez, Geoffrey P. Garnett, Mark R. Dybul, Peter K. Piot
PLOS ONE , 2012, DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0028238
Abstract: Background The use of antiviral medications by HIV negative people to prevent acquisition of HIV or pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) has shown promising results in recent trials. To understand the potential impact of PrEP for HIV prevention, in addition to efficacy data, we need to understand both the acceptability of PrEP among members of potential user groups and the factors likely to determine uptake. Methods and findings Surveys of willingness to use PrEP products were conducted with 1,790 members of potential user groups (FSWs, MSM, IDUs, SDCs and young women) in seven countries: Peru, Ukraine, India, Kenya, Botswana, Uganda and South Africa. Analyses of variance were used to assess levels of acceptance across different user groups and countries. Conjoint analysis was used to examine the attitudes and preferences towards hypothetical and known attributes of PrEP programs and medications. Overall, members of potential user groups were willing to consider taking PrEP (61% reported that they would definitely use PrEP). Current results demonstrate that key user groups in different countries perceived PrEP as giving them new possibilities in their lives and would consider using it as soon as it becomes available. These results were maintained when subjects were reminded of potential side effects, the need to combine condom use with PrEP, and for regular HIV testing. Across populations, route of administration was considered the most important attribute of the presented alternatives. Conclusions Despite multiple conceivable barriers, there was a general willingness to adopt PrEP in key populations, which suggests that if efficacious and affordable, it could be a useful tool in HIV prevention. There would be a willingness to experience inconvenience and expense at the levels included in the survey. The results suggest that delivery in a long lasting injection would be a good target in drug development.
Are Thai MSM Willing to Take PrEP for HIV Prevention? An Analysis of Attitudes, Preferences and Acceptance
Ana Wheelock, Andreas B. Eisingerich, Jintanat Ananworanich, Gabriela B. Gomez, Timothy B. Hallett, Mark R. Dybul, Peter Piot
PLOS ONE , 2013, DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0054288
Abstract: Objective We aimed to understand the attitudes, preferences and acceptance of oral and parenteral PrEP among men who have sex with men (MSM) in Thailand. Background Pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP), the use of antiretrovirals to prevent HIV acquisition, has shown promising results in recent trials. To assess the potential impact of this new HIV prevention method, in addition to efficacy data, we need to understand which psychosocial factors are likely to determine its uptake among members of potential user groups. Methods and Findings Surveys of willingness to use PrEP products were administered to MSM. Spearman’s rank tests were used to uncover associations between questionnaire items. Mann-Whitney tests were performed to ascertain differences between groups. Conjoint analysis was used to examine the attitudes and preferences of MSM towards PrEP attributes. Most participants were willing to consider taking PrEP (39.2% “yes, definitely” and 49.2% “yes, probably”) and perceived PrEP as giving them new possibilities in their lives (38.5% “a lot of hope” and 55.8% “some hope”), even after being instructed of potential side effects and costs. HIV testing was considered the most important attribute and a daily pill and longer lasting injection in the arm were the preferred routes of administration. Conclusions Despite its multiple challenges, MSM in Thailand would be willing to take PrEP, even if they had to experience inconvenience and expense. If PrEP were to be implemented in Thailand, our findings show that its uptake could be considerable.
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