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Search Results: 1 - 10 of 166548 matches for " Paul F. Dellaripa "
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Open-Label, Pilot Study of the Safety and Clinical Effects of Rituximab in Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis-Associated Interstitial Pneumonia  [PDF]
Eric L. Matteson, Tim Bongartz, Jay H. Ryu, Cynthia S. Crowson, Thomas E. Hartman, Paul F. Dellaripa
Open Journal of Rheumatology and Autoimmune Diseases (OJRA) , 2012, DOI: 10.4236/ojra.2012.23011
Abstract: Objective: To investigate the clinical effect of rituximab (RTX) in the management of progressive rheumatoid arthritis related interstitial lung disease (RA-ILD). Methods: A total of 10 patients with progressive RA-ILD were enrolled into this 48-week, open-label treatment study. Treatment was with RTX at 1000 mg at day 1, day 15, and again at weeks 24 and 26, with concomitant methotrexate therapy. Results: The study included 4 men and 6 women. Of 7 evaluable patients at week 48, the diffusing capacity to carbon monoxide had worsened by at least 15% in 1 patient, was stable in 4 patients, and increased by >15% of baseline value in 2 patients. The forced vital capacity declined by at least 10% in 1 patient, was stable in 4 patients, and increased by at least 10% in 2 patients. High resolution computed tomo-graphy of the chest showed improvement in 1 patient, and was unchanged in 5. Three patients were withdrawn, one who had an infusion reaction at week 0, one at week 5 who was hospitalized for congestive heart failure at week 5 and who later died at week 32 of complications following a traumatic hip fracture, and one died at week 6 of possible pneumonia. Conclusions: In this pilot study of 10 patients with RA-ILD treated with RTX, measures of lung disease remained stable in the majority of study completers. Further research is needed to clarify whether this treatment has a role in management of RA-ILD.
The influence of changes in glacier extent and surface elevation on modeled mass balance
F. Paul
The Cryosphere Discussions , 2010, DOI: 10.5194/tcd-4-737-2010
Abstract: Glaciers are widely recognized as unique demonstration objects for climate change impacts, mostly due to the strong change of glacier length in response to small climatic changes. However, glacier mass balance as the direct response to the annual atmospheric conditions can be better interpreted in meteorological terms. When the climatic signal is deduced from long-term mass balance data, changes in glacier geometry (i.e. surface extent and elevation) must be considered as such adjustments form an essential part of the glacier reaction to new climatic conditions. In this study, a set of modeling experiments is performed to assess the influence of changes in glacier geometry on mass balance for constant climatic conditions. The calculations are based on a simplified distributed energy/mass balance model in combination with information on glacier extent and surface elevation for the years 1850 and 1973/1985 for a larger sample of glaciers in the Swiss Alps. The results reveal that about 50–70% of the glacier reaction to climate change (here a one degree increase in temperature) is "hidden" in the geometric adjustment, while only 30–50% can be measured as the long-term mean mass balance. Thereby, changes in glacier extent alone have an even stronger effect, but they are partly compensated for by a lowered surface elevation which gives on average a slightly more negative balance despite an increase of topographic shading. In view of several additional reinforcement feedbacks that are observed in periods of strong glacier decline, it seems that the climatic interpretation of mass balance data is also rather complex.
The influence of changes in glacier extent and surface elevation on modeled mass balance
F. Paul
The Cryosphere , 2010, DOI: 10.5194/tc-4-569-2010
Abstract: Glaciers are widely recognized as unique demonstration objects for climate change impacts, mostly due to the strong change of glacier length in response to small climatic changes. However, glacier mass balance as the direct response to the annual atmospheric conditions can be better interpreted in meteorological terms. When the climatic signal is deduced from long-term mass balance data, changes in glacier geometry (i.e. surface extent and elevation) must be considered as such adjustments form an essential part of the glacier reaction to new climatic conditions. In this study, a set of modelling experiments is performed to assess the influence of changes in glacier geometry on mass balance for constant climatic conditions. The calculations are based on a simplified distributed energy/mass balance model in combination with information on glacier extent and surface elevation for the years 1850 and 1973/1985 for about 60 glaciers in the Swiss Alps. The results reveal that over this period about 50–70% of the glacier reaction to climate change (here a one degree increase in temperature) is "hidden" in the geometric adjustment, while only 30–50% can be measured as the long-term mean mass balance. For larger glaciers, the effect of the areal change is partly reduced by a lowered surface elevation, which results in a slightly more negative balance despite a potential increase of topographic shading. In view of several additional reinforcement feedbacks that are observed in periods of strong glacier decline, it seems that the climatic interpretation of long-term mass balance data is rather complex.
Sarbanes-Oxley and the Accounting Profession: Public Interest Implications  [PDF]
Sara Ann Reiter, Paul F. Williams
Open Journal of Accounting (OJAcct) , 2013, DOI: 10.4236/ojacct.2013.21003
Abstract: The USaccounting profession was caught up in, and some say responsible for, the whirlwind of accounting and business scandals that rocked the US markets in 2002. To restore investor confidence in financial information, the Sarbanes-Oxley Act created a new Public Company Accounting Oversight Board with the authority to set standards for auditors of publicly traded companies, thus ending a century of professional regulation of auditing. In this analysis we employ sociological theories of professionalism [1-4] to help understand the implications of the Sarbanes-Oxley legislation for the accounting profession and for the public interest. We explain why professional self-regulation is important for retaining valuable economic franchises. We also explain why the public interest orientation of the profession is important and how government take-over of auditing standards potentially erodes the public accounting profession’s commitment to the public interest. Self-control over professional work, a key characteristic of professional status, is pre-empted by the newly created government oversight body PCAOB. With government takeover of oversight of auditing practice, claims to professional status are weakened and professional commitment to and involvement with vital work standards may suffer. In addition, the profession may no longer have incentives to promote the public interest or to innovate and change in response to changing conditions. We also trace events leading up to Sarbanes-Oxley legislation and conclude that underlying problems arising from internal work differentiation as consulting work became more profitable and glamorous and development of a commercially oriented work culture may continue to threaten the profession in the future. Finally, we speculate that the greatest costs may be opportunity costs as the profession no longer has the incentives or ability to innovate and embrace new forms of accountability.
Multilocal invariants for the classical groups
Paul F. Dhooghe
International Journal of Mathematics and Mathematical Sciences , 2003, DOI: 10.1155/s016117120301233x
Abstract: Multilocal higher-order invariants, which are higher-order invariants defined at distinct points of representation space, for the classical groups are derived in a systematic way. The basic invariants for the classical groups are the well-known polynomial or rational invariants as derived from the Capelli identities. Higher-order invariants are then constructed from the former ones by means of total derivatives. At each order, it appears that the invariants obtained in this way do not generate all invariants. The necessary additional invariants are constructed from the invariant polynomials on the Lie algebra of the Lie transformation groups.
Constructing and disrupting Ireland's industrial development authority
Donnelly, Dr. Paul F.;
Cadernos EBAPE.BR , 2010, DOI: 10.1590/S1679-39512010000200008
Abstract: actor-network theory is considered to have great potential for broadening and deepening our grasp of institutional work (lawrence; suddaby, 2006). given its focus on process, ant offers a means to breathe life into the practices associated with institutionalization. with callon's (1986) four moments of translation as analytical lens, and with ireland's industrial development authority as empirical example, i seek to address the concerns of clegg and machado da silva (2009) by reconsidering "the role of agency, power, persistence and change in the process of institutionalization".
The rate of electrical energy dissipation (power) and the RC constant unify all electroporation parameters
Paul F. Lurquin
3 Biotech , 2013, DOI: 10.1007/s13205-012-0105-1
Abstract: Electroporation parameters can be optimized by coupling RC constant values with the amount of electrical power dissipation in the electroporation medium. Electroporation efficiency increases more steeply with power at low power values.
New approaches in the management of spasticity in multiple sclerosis patients: role of cannabinoids
Paul F Smith
Therapeutics and Clinical Risk Management , 2010, DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/TCRM.S5974
Abstract: pproaches in the management of spasticity in multiple sclerosis patients: role of cannabinoids Review (4688) Total Article Views Authors: Paul F Smith Published Date February 2010 Volume 2010:6 Pages 59 - 63 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/TCRM.S5974 Paul F Smith Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, School of Medical Sciences, University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand Abstract: Cannabinoids such as Cannabis-based medicinal extracts (CBMEs) are increasingly being used in the treatment of spasticity associated with multiple sclerosis (MS). They have been shown to have a beneficial effect on spasticity; however, this evidence is largely based on subjective rating scales. Objective measurements using the Ashworth scale have tended to show no significant effect; however, the validity of this scale has been questioned. The available clinical trial data suggest that the adverse side effects associated with using CBMEs are generally mild, such as dry mouth, dizziness, somnolence, nausea and intoxication. However, most of these trials were run over a period of months and it is possible that other adverse side effects could develop with long-term use. There may be reason to be concerned about the use of therapeutic cannabinoids by adolescents, people predisposed to psychosis and pregnant women.
Moral Analogies in Print: Emblematic Thinking in the Making of Early Modern Books.
Paul F. Gehl
Philosophica , 2002,
Abstract:
New approaches in the management of spasticity in multiple sclerosis patients: role of cannabinoids
Paul F Smith
Therapeutics and Clinical Risk Management , 2010,
Abstract: Paul F SmithDepartment of Pharmacology and Toxicology, School of Medical Sciences, University of Otago, Dunedin, New ZealandAbstract: Cannabinoids such as Cannabis-based medicinal extracts (CBMEs) are increasingly being used in the treatment of spasticity associated with multiple sclerosis (MS). They have been shown to have a beneficial effect on spasticity; however, this evidence is largely based on subjective rating scales. Objective measurements using the Ashworth scale have tended to show no significant effect; however, the validity of this scale has been questioned. The available clinical trial data suggest that the adverse side effects associated with using CBMEs are generally mild, such as dry mouth, dizziness, somnolence, nausea and intoxication. However, most of these trials were run over a period of months and it is possible that other adverse side effects could develop with long-term use. There may be reason to be concerned about the use of therapeutic cannabinoids by adolescents, people predisposed to psychosis and pregnant women.Keywords: multiple sclerosis, spasticity, cannabinoids, Cannabis
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