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Search Results: 1 - 10 of 23810 matches for " Paul DP Pharoah "
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Meta-analysis confirms BCL2 is an independent prognostic marker in breast cancer
Grace M Callagy, Mark J Webber, Paul DP Pharoah, Carlos Caldas
BMC Cancer , 2008, DOI: 10.1186/1471-2407-8-153
Abstract: Reports published in 1994–2006 were selected for the meta-analysis using a search of PubMed. Studies that investigated the role of BCL2 expression by immunohistochemistry with a sample size greater than 100 were included. Seventeen papers reported the results of 18 different series including 5,892 cases with an average median follow-up of 92.1 months.Eight studies investigated DFS unadjusted for other variables in 2,285 cases. The relative hazard estimates ranged from 0.85 – 3.03 with a combined random effects estimate of 1.66 (95%CI 1.25 – 2.22). The effect of BCL2 on DFS adjusted for other prognostic factors was reported in 11 studies and the pooled random effects hazard ratio estimate was 1.58 (95%CI 1.29–1.94). OS was investigated unadjusted for other variables in eight studies incorporating 3,910 cases. The hazard estimates ranged from 0.99–4.31 with a pooled estimate of risk of 1.64 (95%CI 1.36–2.0). OS adjusted for other parameters was evaluated in nine series comprising 3,624 cases and the estimates for these studies ranged from 1.10 to 2.49 with a pooled estimate of 1.37 (95%CI 1.19–1.58).The meta-analysis strongly supports the prognostic role of BCL2 as assessed by immunohistochemistry in breast cancer and shows that this effect is independent of lymph node status, tumour size and tumour grade as well as a range of other biological variables on multi-variate analysis. Large prospective studies are now needed to establish the clinical utility of BCL2 as an independent prognostic marker.Breast cancer is a heterogenous disease whose behaviour is determined by the molecular characteristics of the tumour. In clinical practice, we rely on clinico-pathological features to predict tumour behaviour and patient outcome. These are powerful independent prognosticators [1,2] but are imperfect and represent only crude measures of the biological behaviour of a tumour. The power of these factors can be increased when they are used in combination e.g. the Nottingham Progno
Correction: PREDICT: a new UK prognostic model that predicts survival following surgery for invasive breast cancer
Gordon C Wishart, Elizabeth M Azzato, David C Greenberg, Jem Rashbass, Olive Kearins, Gill Lawrence, Carlos Caldas, Paul DP Pharoah
Breast Cancer Research , 2010, DOI: 10.1186/bcr2480
Abstract:
PREDICT: a new UK prognostic model that predicts survival following surgery for invasive breast cancer
Gordon C Wishart, Elizabeth M Azzato, David C Greenberg, Jem Rashbass, Olive Kearins, Gill Lawrence, Carlos Caldas, Paul DP Pharoah
Breast Cancer Research , 2010, DOI: 10.1186/bcr2464
Abstract: Using the Eastern Cancer Registration and Information Centre (ECRIC) dataset, information was collated for 5,694 women who had surgery for invasive breast cancer in East Anglia from 1999 to 2003. Breast cancer mortality models for oestrogen receptor (ER) positive and ER negative tumours were derived from these data using Cox proportional hazards, adjusting for prognostic factors and mode of cancer detection (symptomatic versus screen-detected). An external dataset of 5,468 patients from the West Midlands Cancer Intelligence Unit (WMCIU) was used for validation.Differences in overall actual and predicted mortality were <1% at eight years for ECRIC (18.9% vs. 19.0%) and WMCIU (17.5% vs. 18.3%) with area under receiver-operator-characteristic curves (AUC) of 0.81 and 0.79 respectively. Differences in breast cancer specific actual and predicted mortality were <1% at eight years for ECRIC (12.9% vs. 13.5%) and <1.5% at eight years for WMCIU (12.2% vs. 13.6%) with AUC of 0.84 and 0.82 respectively. Model calibration was good for both ER positive and negative models although the ER positive model provided better discrimination (AUC 0.82) than ER negative (AUC 0.75).We have developed a prognostication model for early breast cancer based on UK cancer registry data that predicts breast cancer survival following surgery for invasive breast cancer and includes mode of detection for the first time. The model is well calibrated, provides a high degree of discrimination and has been validated in a second UK patient cohort.Accurate prediction of survival is an essential part of the decision making process following surgery for early breast cancer and allows clinicians to determine which patients will benefit from adjuvant therapy. At present these decisions are largely based on known pathological prognostic factors that retain independent significance on multivariate analysis including tumour size, tumour grade and lymph node status in addition to the efficacy of any adjuvant thera
Seq4SNPs: new software for retrieval of multiple, accurately annotated DNA sequences, ready formatted for SNP assay design
Helen I Field, Serena A Scollen, Craig Luccarini, Caroline Baynes, Jonathan Morrison, Alison M Dunning, Douglas F Easton, Paul DP Pharoah
BMC Bioinformatics , 2009, DOI: 10.1186/1471-2105-10-180
Abstract: We created Seq4SNPs, a web-based, walk-away software that can process one to several hundred SNPs given rs numbers as input. It outputs a file of fully annotated sequences formatted for one of three proprietary design softwares: TaqMan's Primer-By-Design FileBuilder, Sequenom's iPLEX or SNPstream's Autoprimer, as well as unannotated fasta sequences. We found genotyping assays to be inhibited by repetitive sequences or the presence of additional variations flanking the SNP under test, and in multiplexes, repetitive sequence flanking one SNP adversely affects multiple assays. Assay design software programs avoid such regions if the input sequences are appropriately annotated, so we used Seq4SNPs to provide suitably annotated input sequences, and improved our genotyping success rate. Adjacent SNPs can also be avoided, by annotating sequences used as input for primer design.The accuracy of annotation by Seq4SNPs is significantly better than manual annotation (P < 1e-5).Using Seq4SNPs to incorporate all annotation for additional SNPs and repetitive elements into sequences, for genotyping assay designer software, minimizes assay failure at the design stage, reducing the cost of genotyping. Seq4SNPs provides a rapid route for replacement of poor test SNP sequences. We routinely use this software for assay sequence preparation.Seq4SNPs is available as a service at http://moya.srl.cam.ac.uk/oncology/bio/s4shome.html webcite and http://moya.srl.cam.ac.uk/cgi-bin/oncology/srl/ncbi/seq4snp1.pl webcite, currently for human SNPs, but easily extended to include any species in dbSNP.A survey of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) and primer design software reveals several packages that align EST or genome sequences to discover SNPs [1-6]. SNP-VISTA visualizes SNPs from aligned genome sequences [7]. Other packages take a chromosome region then use recorded SNP genotypes, and additional information, to reduce the set of SNPs that need genotyping [[8,9] and references therein]. SNP i
Effects of common germline genetic variation in cell cycle control genes on breast cancer survival: results from a population-based cohort
Elizabeth M Azzato, Kristy E Driver, Fabienne Lesueur, Mitul Shah, David Greenberg, Douglas F Easton, Andrew E Teschendorff, Carlos Caldas, Neil E Caporaso, Paul DP Pharoah
Breast Cancer Research , 2008, DOI: 10.1186/bcr2100
Abstract: We examined associations between common germline genetic variation in 13 genes involved in cell cycle control (CCND1, CCND2, CCND3, CCNE1, CDK2 [p33], CDK4, CDK6, CDKN1A [p21, Cip1], CDKN1B [p27, Kip1], CDKN2A [p16], CDKN2B [p15], CDKN2C [p18], and CDKN2D [p19]) and survival among women diagnosed with invasive breast cancer participating in the SEARCH (Studies of Epidemiology and Risk factors in Cancer Heredity) breast cancer study. DNA from up to 4,470 women was genotyped for 85 polymorphisms that tag the known common polymorphisms (minor allele frequency > 0.05) in the genes. The genotypes of each polymorphism were tested for association with survival using Cox regression analysis.The rare allele of the tagging single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs2479717 is associated with an increased risk of death (hazard ratio = 1.26 per rare allele carried, 95% confidence interval: 1.12 to 1.42; P = 0.0001), which was not attenuated after adjusting for tumour stage, grade, and treatment. This SNP is part of a large linkage disequilibrium block, which contains CCND3, BYSL, TRFP, USP49, C6ofr49, FRS3, and PGC. We evaluated the association of survival and somatic expression of these genes in breast tumours using expression microarray data from seven published datasets. Elevated expression of the C6orf49 transcript was associated with breast cancer survival, adding biological interest to the finding.It is possible that CCND3 rs2479717, or another variant it tags, is associated with prognosis after a diagnosis of breast cancer. Further study is required to validate this finding.Excluding non-melanoma skin cancer, breast cancer is the most common cancer in the UK, with 36,939 new cases diagnosed in 2004 [1]. The prognosis of breast cancer is generally good, with an overall 5-year survival rate of approximately 80% in England and Wales [2]. Clinical stage at diagnosis, including tumour size, lymph node status, and presence of metastases, along with tumour biological factors such a
BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations in a population-based study of male breast cancer
Victoria M Basham, Julian M Lipscombe, Joanna M Ward, Simon A Gayther, Bruce AJ Ponder, Douglas F Easton, Paul DP Pharoah
Breast Cancer Research , 2001, DOI: 10.1186/bcr419
Abstract: We have carried out a population-based study of 94 MBC cases collected in the UK. We screened genomic DNA for mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 and used family history data from these cases to calculate the risk of breast cancer to female relatives of MBC cases. We also estimated the contribution of BRCA1 and BRCA2 to this risk.Nineteen cases (20%) reported a first-degree relative with breast cancer, of whom seven also had an affected second-degree relative. The breast cancer risk in female first-degree relatives was 2.4 times (95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.4–4.0) the risk in the general population. No BRCA1 mutation carriers were identified and five cases were found to carry a mutation in BRCA2. Allowing for a mutation detection sensitivity frequency of 70%, the carrier frequency for BRCA2 mutations was 8% (95% CI = 3–19). All the mutation carriers had a family history of breast, ovarian, prostate or pancreatic cancer. However, BRCA2 accounted for only 15% of the excess familial risk of breast cancer in female first-degree relatives.These data suggest that other genes that confer an increased risk for both female and male breast cancer have yet to be found.Male breast cancer (MBC) is a rare disease and little is known about its aetiology. However, female first-degree relatives of MBC cases are at increased risk of breast cancer [1,2,3,4,5,6], which suggests that there is an inherited component to the disease. Several genes that are associated with a high lifetime risk of breast cancer in women have been identified during the past decade. One of these, BRCA2, has also been shown to confer a significant risk of breast cancer in men, and a recent study found the risk of breast cancer in male BRCA2 mutation carriers from multiple case breast/ovarian cancer families to be 80-fold higher than in the general population [7]. This equates to a 7% risk of breast cancer by age 80. The prevalence of BRCA2 mutations in MBC cases unselected for family history has been estimated in
Saliva samples are a viable alternative to blood samples as a source of DNA for high throughput genotyping
Jean E Abraham, Mel J Maranian, Inmaculada Spiteri, Roslin Russell, Susan Ingle, Craig Luccarini, Helena M Earl, Paul DP Pharoah, Alison M Dunning, Carlos Caldas
BMC Medical Genomics , 2012, DOI: 10.1186/1755-8794-5-19
Abstract: Patients were recruited from the Pharmacogenetics of Breast Cancer Chemotherapy (PGSNPS) study. Paired blood and saliva samples were collected from 79 study participants. The Oragene DNA Self-Collection kit (DNAgenotek?) was used to collect and extract DNA from saliva. DNA from EDTA blood samples (median volume 8 ml) was extracted by Gen-Probe, Livingstone, UK. DNA yields, standard measures of DNA quality, genotype call rates and genotype concordance between paired, duplicated samples were assessed.Total DNA yields were lower from saliva (mean 24 μg, range 0.2–52 μg) than from blood (mean 210 μg, range 58–577 μg) and a 2-fold difference remained after adjusting for the volume of biological material collected. Protein contamination and DNA fragmentation measures were greater in saliva DNA. 78/79 saliva samples yielded sufficient DNA for use on Illumina Beadchip arrays and using Taqman assays. Four samples were randomly selected for genotyping in duplicate on the Illumina Beadchip arrays. All samples were genotyped using Taqman assays. DNA quality, as assessed by genotype call rates and genotype concordance between matched pairs of DNA was high (>97%) for each measure in both blood and saliva-derived DNA.We conclude that DNA from saliva and blood samples is comparable when genotyping using either Taqman assays or genome-wide chip arrays. Saliva sampling has the potential to increase participant recruitment within clinical trials, as well as reducing the resources and organisation required for multicentre sample collection.
Common variants in the ATM, BRCA1, BRCA2, CHEK2 and TP53 cancer susceptibility genes are unlikely to increase breast cancer risk
Caroline Baynes, Catherine S Healey, Karen A Pooley, Serena Scollen, Robert N Luben, Deborah J Thompson, Paul DP Pharoah, Douglas F Easton, Bruce AJ Ponder, Alison M Dunning, the SEARCH breast cancer study
Breast Cancer Research , 2007, DOI: 10.1186/bcr1669
Abstract: We have attempted a comprehensive, single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)- and haplotype-tagging association study on each of these five genes in up to 4,474 breast cancer cases from the British, East Anglian SEARCH study and 4,560 controls from the EPIC-Norfolk study, using a two-stage study design. Nine tag SNPs were genotyped in ATM, together with five in BRCA1, sixteen in BRCA2, ten in CHEK2 and five in TP53, with the aim of tagging all other known, common variants. SNPs generating the common amino acid substitutions were specifically forced into the tagging set for each gene.No significant breast cancer associations were detected with any individual or combination of tag SNPs.It is unlikely that there are any other common variants in these genes conferring measurably increased risks of breast cancer in our study population.Four of the genes which lie in the DNA damage-recognition and repair pathway, ATM, BRCA1, BRCA2 and TP53, have mutations that are recognised to increase breast cancer susceptibility with moderate to high penetrance. Such mutations are very rare, and most probably of recent origin. A fifth gene, CHEK2, in the same pathway, has a deletion (1100delC) that reaches polymorphic frequencies (>0.01) in some European countries and doubles the risk of breast cancer in female carriers [1]. Together these mutations account for only a small proportion (2% to 5%) of all breast cancer incidences [2,3]. Breast cancer is, however, a common disease and genetic epidemiological data suggest that there is a low-penetrance genetic contribution to most cases [4,5]. It is likely that at least a part of breast cancer aetiology will fit the common disease-common variant hypothesis, which states that patients with a common, complex disease are likely to share some common, low-penetrance alleles that increase their susceptibility to that disease. This raises the question of whether such common, polymorphic susceptibility alleles exist within these five genes in addition t
CYP2D6 gene variants: association with breast cancer specific survival in a cohort of breast cancer patients from the United Kingdom treated with adjuvant tamoxifen
Jean E Abraham, Mel J Maranian, Kristy E Driver, Radka Platte, Bolot Kalmyrzaev, Caroline Baynes, Craig Luccarini, Mitul Shah, Susan Ingle, David Greenberg, Helena M Earl, Alison M Dunning, Paul DP Pharoah, Carlos Caldas
Breast Cancer Research , 2010, DOI: 10.1186/bcr2629
Abstract: This was a population based case-cohort study. We genotyped known functional variants (n = 7; minor allele frequency (MAF) > 0.01) and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) (n = 5; MAF > 0.05) tagging all known common variants (tagSNPs), in CYP2D6 in 6640 DNA samples from patients with invasive breast cancer from SEARCH (Studies of Epidemiology and Risk factors in Cancer Heredity); 3155 cases had received tamoxifen therapy. There were 312 deaths from breast cancer, in the tamoxifen treated patients, with over 18000 years of cumulative follow-up. The association between genotype and BCSS was evaluated using Cox proportional hazards regression analysis.In tamoxifen treated patients, there was weak evidence that the poor-metaboliser variant, CYP2D6*6 (MAF = 0.01), was associated with decreased BCSS (P = 0.02; HR = 1.95; 95% CI = 1.12-3.40). No other variants, including CYP2D6*4 (MAF = 0.20), previously reported to be associated with poorer clinical outcomes, were associated with differences in BCSS, in either the tamoxifen or non-tamoxifen groups.CYP2D6*6 may affect BCSS in tamoxifen-treated patients. However, the absence of an association with survival in more frequent variants, including CYP2D6*4, questions the validity of the reported association between CYP2D6 genotype and treatment response in breast cancer. Until larger, prospective studies confirming any associations are available, routine CYP2D6 genetic testing should not be used in the clinical setting.Tamoxifen has been the standard treatment for oestrogen receptor (ER)-positive breast cancer for more than three decades. Indications for its use [1] include: metastatic disease in women (pre- and post-menopausal) and men; adjuvant therapy in pre- and post-menopausal women with breast cancer (lymph node positive and negative); preventative therapy in women at high risk of breast cancer; ductal carcinoma in situ post-resection; and for the prevention of contra-lateral breast cancer. There are proven benefits ass
Combined effects of single nucleotide polymorphisms TP53 R72P and MDM2 SNP309, and p53 expression on survival of breast cancer patients
Marjanka K Schmidt, Johanna Tommiska, Annegien Broeks, Flora E van Leeuwen, Laura J Van't Veer, Paul DP Pharoah, Douglas F Easton, Mitul Shah, Manjeet Humphreys, Thilo D?rk, Scarlett A Reincke, Rainer Fagerholm, Carl Blomqvist, Heli Nevanlinna
Breast Cancer Research , 2009, DOI: 10.1186/bcr2460
Abstract: We pooled data from four breast cancer cohorts within the Breast Cancer Association Consortium for which both TP53 R72P and MDM2 SNP309 were genotyped and follow-up was available (n = 3,749). Overall and breast cancer-specific survival analyses were performed using Kaplan-Meier analysis and multivariate Cox's proportional hazards regression models.Survival of patients did not differ by carriership of either germ-line variant, R72P (215G>C) or SNP309 (-410G>T) alone. Immunohistochemical p53 staining of the tumor was available for two cohorts (n = 1,109 patients). Survival was worse in patients with p53-positive tumors (n = 301) compared to patients with p53-negative tumors (n = 808); breast cancer-specific survival: HR 1.6 (95% CI 1.2 to 2.1), P = 0.001. Within the patient group with p53-negative tumors, TP53 rare homozygous (CC) carriers had a worse survival than G-allele (GG/GC) carriers; actuarial breast cancer-specific survival 71% versus 80%, P = 0.07; HR 1.8 (1.1 to 3.1), P = 0.03. We also found a differential effect of combinations of the two germ-line variants on overall survival; homozygous carriers of the G-allele in MDM2 had worse survival only within the group of TP53 C-allele carriers; actuarial overall survival (GG versus TT/TG) 64% versus 75%, P = 0.001; HR (GG versus TT) 1.5 (1.1 to 2.0), P = 0.01. We found no evidence for a differential effect of MDM2 SNP309 by p53 protein expression on survival.The TP53 R72P variant may be an independent predictor for survival of patients with p53-negative tumors. The combined effect of TP53 R72P and MDM2 SNP309 on survival is in line with our a priori biologically-supported hypothesis, that is, the role of enhanced DNA repair function of the TP53 Pro-variant, combined with increased expression of the Mdm2 protein, and thus overall attenuation of the p53 pathway in the tumor cells.Breast cancer outcome may be affected by germ-line variants in genes that play a role in DNA damage control and repair such as TP53 (R72P
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