oalib

Publish in OALib Journal

ISSN: 2333-9721

APC: Only $99

Submit

Any time

2019 ( 347 )

2018 ( 595 )

2017 ( 571 )

2016 ( 692 )

Custom range...

Search Results: 1 - 10 of 303576 matches for " O. L. Phillips "
All listed articles are free for downloading (OA Articles)
Page 1 /303576
Display every page Item
Liana infestation impacts tree growth in a lowland tropical moist forest
G. M. F. van der Heijden ,O. L. Phillips
Biogeosciences (BG) & Discussions (BGD) , 2009,
Abstract: Ecosystem-level estimates of the effect of lianas on tree growth in mature tropical forests are needed to evaluate the functional impact of lianas and their potential to affect the ability of tropical forests to sequester carbon, but these are currently lacking. Using data collected on tree growth rates, local growing conditions and liana competition in five permanent sampling plots in Amazonian Peru, we present the first ecosystem-level estimates of the effect of lianas on above-ground productivity of trees. By first constructing a multi-level linear mixed effect model to predict individual-tree diameter growth model using individual-tree growth conditions, we were able to then estimate stand-level above-ground biomass (AGB) increment in the absence of lianas. We show that lianas, mainly by competing above-ground with trees, reduce tree annual above-ground stand-level biomass increment by ~10%, equivalent to 0.51 Mg dry weight ha 1 yr 1 or 0.25 Mg C ha 1 yr 1. AGB increment of lianas themselves was estimated to be 0.15 Mg dry weight ha 1 yr 1 or 0.07 Mg C ha 1 yr 1, thus only compensating ~29% of the liana-induced reduction in ecosystem AGB increment. Increasing liana pressure on tropical forests will therefore not only tend to reduce their carbon storage capacity, by indirectly promoting tree species with low-density wood, but also their rate of carbon uptake, with potential consequences for the rate of increase in atmospheric carbon dioxide.
Liana infestation impacts tree growth in a lowland tropical moist forest
G. M. F. van der Heijden,O. L. Phillips
Biogeosciences Discussions , 2009,
Abstract: Stand-level estimates of the effect of lianas on tree growth in mature tropical forests are needed to evaluate the functional impact of lianas and their potential to affect the ability of tropical forests to sequester carbon, but these are currently lacking. Using data collected on tree growth rates, local growing conditions and liana competition in five permanent sampling plots in Amazonian Peru, we present the first such estimates of the effect of lianas on above-ground productivity of trees. By constructing a multi-level linear mixed effect model to predict individual tree diameter growth model using individual tree growth conditions, we were able to estimate stand-level above-ground biomass (AGB) increment in the absence of lianas. We show that lianas, mainly by competing above-ground with trees, reduce tree annual above-ground stand-level biomass by ~10%, equivalent to 0.51 Mg dry weight ha 1 yr 1 or 0.25 Mg C ha 1 yr 1. AGB increment of lianas themselves was estimated to be 0.15 Mg dry weight ha 1 yr 1 or 0.07 Mg C ha 1 yr 1, thus only compensating ~29% of the liana-induced reduction in stand-level AGB increment. Increasing liana pressure on tropical forests may therefore not only reduce their carbon storage capacity, by indirectly promoting tree species with low-density wood, but also their rate of carbon uptake, with potential consequences for the rate of increase in atmospheric carbon dioxide.
Height-diameter allometry of tropical forest trees
T. R. Feldpausch,L. Banin,O. L. Phillips,T. R. Baker
Biogeosciences Discussions , 2010, DOI: 10.5194/bgd-7-7727-2010
Abstract: Tropical tree height-diameter (H:D) relationships may vary by forest type and region making large-scale estimates of above-ground biomass subject to bias if they ignore these differences in stem allometry. We have therefore developed a new global tropical forest database consisting of 39 955 concurrent H and D measurements encompassing 283 sites in 22 tropical countries. Utilising this database, our objectives were: 1. to determine if H:D relationships differ by geographic region and forest type (wet to dry forests, including zones of tension where forest and savanna overlap). 2. to ascertain if the H:D relationship is modulated by climate and/or forest structural characteristics (e.g. stand-level basal area, A). 3. to develop H:D allometric equations and evaluate biases to reduce error in future local-to-global estimates of tropical forest biomass. Annual precipitation coefficient of variation (PV), dry season length (SD), and mean annual air temperature (TA) emerged as key drivers of variation in H:D relationships at the pantropical and region scales. Vegetation structure also played a role with trees in forests of a high A being, on average, taller at any given D. After the effects of environment and forest structure are taken into account, two main regional groups can be identified. Forests in Asia, Africa and the Guyana Shield all have, on average, similar H:D relationships, but with trees in the forests of much of the Amazon Basin and tropical Australia typically being shorter at any given D than their counterparts elsewhere. The region-environment-structure model with the lowest Akaike's information criterion and lowest deviation estimated stand-level H across all plots to within a median –2.7 to 0.9% of the true value. Some of the plot-to-plot variability in H:D relationships not accounted for by this model could be attributed to variations in soil physical conditions. Other things being equal, trees tend to be more slender in the absence of soil physical constraints, especially at smaller D. Pantropical and continental-level models provided only poor estimates of H, especially when the roles of climate and stand structure in modulating H:D allometry were not simultaneously taken into account.
Integrating regional and continental scale comparisons of tree composition in Amazonian terra firme forests
E. N. Honorio Coronado,T. R. Baker,O. L. Phillips,N. C. A. Pitman
Biogeosciences Discussions , 2009,
Abstract: We contrast regional and continental-scale comparisons of the floristic composition of terra firme forest in South Amazonia, using 55 plots across Amazonia and a subset of 30 plots from northern Peru and Ecuador. Firstly, we examine the floristic patterns using both genus- or species-level data and find that the species-level analysis more clearly distinguishes different plot clusters. Secondly, we compare the patterns and causes of floristic differences at regional and continental scales. At a continental scale, ordination analysis shows that species of Lecythidaceae and Sapotaceae are gradually replaced by species of Arecaceae and Myristicaceae from eastern to western Amazonia. These floristic gradients are correlated with gradients in soil fertility and to dry season length, similar to previous studies. At a regional scale, similar patterns are found within north-western Amazonia, where differences in soil fertility distinguish plots where species of Lecythidaceae, characteristic of poor soils, are gradually replaced by species of Myristicaceae on richer soils. The main coordinate of this regional-scale ordination correlates mainly with concentrations of available calcium and magnesium. Thirdly, we ask at a regional scale within north-western Amazonia, whether soil fertility or other distance dependent processes are more important for determining variation in floristic composition. A Mantel test indicates that both soils and geographical distance have a similar and significant role in determining floristic similarity across this region. Overall, these results suggest that regional-scale variation in floristic composition can rival continental scale differences within Amazonian terra firme forests, and that variation in floristic composition at both scales is dependent on a range of processes that include both habitat specialisation related to edaphic conditions and other distance-dependent processes. To fully account for regional scale variation in continental studies of floristic composition, future floristic studies should focus on forest types poorly represented at regional scales in current datasets such as terra firme forests with high soil fertility from north-western Amazonia.
Do species traits determine patterns of wood production in Amazonian forests?
T. R. Baker,O. L. Phillips,W. F. Laurance,N. C. A. Pitman
Biogeosciences Discussions , 2008,
Abstract: Understanding the relationships between plant traits and ecosystem properties at large spatial scales is important for predicting how compositional change will affect carbon cycling in tropical forests. Here, we examine the relationships between species wood density, maximum height and wood production for 60 Amazonian forest plots. Firstly, we examine how community-level species traits vary across Amazonia. Average species maximum height and wood density are low in western, compared to eastern, Amazonia and are negatively correlated with aboveground wood productivity and soil fertility. Secondly, we compare biomass growth rates across functional groups defined on the basis of these two traits. In similar size classes, biomass growth rates vary little between trees that differ in wood density and maximum height. However, biomass growth rates are generally higher in western Amazonia across all functional groups. Thirdly, we ask whether the data on the abundance and average biomass growth rates of different functional groups is sufficient to predict the observed, regional-scale pattern of wood productivity. We find that the lower rate of wood production in eastern compared to western Amazonia cannot be estimated on the basis of this information. Overall, these results suggest that the correlations between community-level trait values and wood productivity in Amazonian forests are not causative: direct environmental control of biomass growth rates appears to be the most important driver of wood production at regional scales. This result contrasts with findings for forest biomass where variation in wood density, associated with variation in species composition, is an important driver of regional-scale patterns. Tropical forest wood productivity may therefore be less sensitive than biomass to compositional change that alters community-level averages of these plant traits.
After trees die: quantities and determinants of necromass across Amazonia
K.-J. Chao,O. L. Phillips,T. R. Baker,J. Peacock
Biogeosciences Discussions , 2009,
Abstract: The Amazon basin, one of the most substantial biomass carbon pools on earth, is characterised by strong macroecological gradients in biomass, mortality rates, and wood density from the west to the east. These gradients could affect necromass stocks, but this has not yet been tested. This study aims to assess the stocks and determinants of necromass patterns across Amazonian forests. Field-based and literature data were used to find relationships between necromass and possible determinants. The final regression result was used to estimate and extrapolate the necromass stocks across terra firma Amazonian forests. In eight northwestern and three northeastern Amazonian permanent plots, volumes of coarse woody debris (≥10 cm diameter) were measured in the field and density of each decay class was estimated. Forest structure and historical mortality data were used to determine controlling factors of necromass. Necromass is greater in forests with low stem mortality rates (northeast) rather than forest with high stem mortality rates (northwest) (58.5±10.6 and 27.3±3.2 Mg ha 1, respectively). After integrating all published necromass values, we find that necromass across terra firma forests in Amazonia is positively related to stand biomass, mortality mass input, and average wood density of live trees (ρBA j). We applied these relationships to estimate necromass for plots where necromass has not been measured. The estimates, together with other actual measurements of necromass, were scaled-up to project a total Amazonian necromass of 9.6±1.0 Pg C. The ratio of necromass (on average weighted by forest region) to coarse aboveground biomass is 0.127. Overall, we find (1) a strong spatial trend in necromass in parallel with other macroecological gradients and (2) that necromass is a substantial component of the carbon pool in the Amazon.
Multi-scale comparisons of tree composition in Amazonian terra firme forests
E. N. Honorio Coronado,T. R. Baker,O. L. Phillips,N. C. A. Pitman
Biogeosciences (BG) & Discussions (BGD) , 2009,
Abstract: We explored the floristic composition of terra firme forests across Amazonia using 55 plots. Firstly, we examined the floristic patterns using both genus- and species-level data and found that the species-level analysis more clearly distinguishes among forests. Next, we compared the variation in plot floristic composition at regional- and continental-scales, and found that average among-pair floristic similarity and its decay with distance behave similarly at regional- and continental-scales. Nevertheless, geographical distance had different effects on floristic similarity within regions at distances <100 km, where north-western and south-western Amazonian regions showed greater floristic variation than plots of central and eastern Amazonia. Finally, we quantified the role of environmental factors and geographical distance for determining variation in floristic composition. A partial Mantel test indicated that while geographical distance appeared to be more important at continental scales, soil fertility was crucial at regional scales within western Amazonia, where areas with similar soil conditions were more likely to share a high number of species. Overall, these results suggest that regional-scale variation in floristic composition can rival continental-scale differences within Amazonian terra firme forests, and that variation in floristic composition at both scales is influenced by geographical distance and environmental factors, such as climate and soil fertility. To fully account for regional-scale variation in continental studies of floristic composition, future floristic studies should focus on forest types poorly represented at regional scales in current datasets, such as terra firme forests with high soil fertility in north-western Amazonia.
Modelling Financially Optimal Afforestation and Forest Management Scenarios Using a Bio-Economic Model  [PDF]
Mary Ryan, Cathal O’Donoghue, Henry Phillips
Open Journal of Forestry (OJF) , 2016, DOI: 10.4236/ojf.2016.61003
Abstract: The expansion of non-industrial private forests (NIPF) in Ireland is unique in the European context in which the almost doubling of forest cover within the last thirty years has taken place largely on farmland. This is not surprising as Ireland has some of the highest growth rates for conifers in Europe and also has a large proportion of land which is marginal for agriculture but highly productive under forests. However, in recent years, afforestation in Ireland as in many European countries has fallen well short of policy targets. As the farm afforestation decision essentially involves an inter-temporal land use change, farmers need comprehensive information on forest market returns under different environmental conditions and forest management regimes. This paper describes the systematic development of a cohort forest bio-economic model which examines financially optimal afforestation and management choices. Simulating a range of productivity and harvesting scenarios for Sitka spruce, we find that different objectives result in different outcomes. We see substantial differences between the biologically optimal rotation, the reduced rotation in common usage and the financially optimal rotation which maximises net present value and find that the results are particularly sensitive to the choice of management and methodological assumptions. Specifically, we find that better site productivity and thin versus no-thin options result in shorter rotations across all optimisations, reinforcing the usefulness of this type of financial modelling approach. This information is critical for future policy design to further incentivise afforestation of agricultural land.
Self-reported colorectal cancer screening of Medicare beneficiaries in family medicine vs. internal medicine practices in the United States: a cross-sectional study
Angela Y Higgins, Anna R B Doubeni, Karon L Phillips, Adeyinka O Laiyemo, Becky Briesacher, Jennifer Tjia, Chyke A Doubeni
BMC Gastroenterology , 2012, DOI: 10.1186/1471-230x-12-23
Abstract: Nationally representative sample of non-institutionalized beneficiaries who received medical care from FPs or internists in 2006 (using Medicare Current Beneficiary Survey). The main outcome was the percentage of patients screened in 2007. We also examined the percentage of patients offered screening.Patients of FPs, compared to those of internists, were less likely to have received an FOBT kit or undergone home FOBT, even after accounting for patients' characteristics. Compared to internists, FPs' patients were more likely to have heard of colonoscopy, but were less likely to receive a screening colonoscopy recommendation (18% vs. 27%), or undergo a colonoscopy (43% vs. 46%, adjusted odds ratios [AOR], 95% confidence interval [CI]-- 0.65, 0.51-0.81) or any CRC screening (52% vs. 60%, AOR, CI--0.80, 0.68-0.94). Among subgroups examined, higher income beneficiaries receiving care from internists had the highest screening rate (68%), while disabled beneficiaries receiving care from FPs had the lowest screening rate (34%).Patients cared for by FPs had a lower rate of screening compared to those cared for by internists, despite equal or higher levels of awareness; a difference that remained statistically significant after accounting for socioeconomic status and access to healthcare. Both groups of patients remained below the national goal of 70 percent.Screening has been shown to decrease the risk of mortality for colorectal cancer (CRC) [1-4]. Although the use of CRC screening has increased in the US, particularly over the past decade [5,6], for many groups, screening rates are below the Healthy People goal of 70% [7]. Primary care physicians (PCPs) play an important role in the delivery of CRC screening services [6,8-12] by advising, recommending, performing and/or referring patients for screening [13]. It is therefore not surprising that studies have consistently reported a strong association between healthcare provider recommendations for and receipt of CRC screenin
Strongly inhibited transport of a 1D Bose gas in a lattice
C. D. Fertig,K. M. O'Hara,J. H. Huckans,S. L. Rolston,W. D. Phillips,J. V. Porto
Physics , 2004, DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevLett.94.120403
Abstract: We report the observation of strongly damped dipole oscillations of a quantum degenerate 1D atomic Bose gas in a combined harmonic and optical lattice potential. Damping is significant for very shallow axial lattices (0.25 photon recoil energies), and increases dramatically with increasing lattice depth, such that the gas becomes nearly immobile for times an order of magnitude longer than the single-particle tunneling time. Surprisingly, we see no broadening of the atomic quasimomentum distribution after damped motion. Recent theoretical work suggests that quantum fluctuations can strongly damp dipole oscillations of 1D atomic Bose gas, providing a possible explanation for our observations.
Page 1 /303576
Display every page Item


Home
Copyright © 2008-2017 Open Access Library. All rights reserved.