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Search Results: 1 - 10 of 747 matches for " Natasha Cassara "
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Perceptions of cultural competency of undergraduate nursing students  [PDF]
Diane Von Ah, Natasha Cassara
Open Journal of Nursing (OJN) , 2013, DOI: 10.4236/ojn.2013.32024
Abstract:

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine the level of cultural competence of undergraduate nursing students at a large Midwestern University. Background: Developing cultural competence of nurses is critical to meet the needs of our growing diverse society. Methods: A convenience sample of 150 undergraduate nursing students completed a one-time questionnaire assessing students’ cultural competence. Results: Nursing students’ rated their overall knowledge and comfort moderate to poor with only 28% rated themselves as very comfortable and 15% as very skillful in providing culturally competent care. Students rated their knowledge and comfort highest in taking a family history, whereas, the lowest scores were related to pregnancy and childbirth, death and dying, and organ donation in other cultures. Conclusions: Findings suggest that nursing students feel inadequately prepared to provide culturally competent care.

The Effects of Pre-Surgical Education on Patient Expectations in Total Knee Arthroplasties  [PDF]
Steven Furney, Natasha Montez
Open Journal of Preventive Medicine (OJPM) , 2015, DOI: 10.4236/ojpm.2015.512050
Abstract: As patients prepare for total-knee arthroplasty surgery, they have many expectations related to their long-term recovery and function. This research examined whether the use of a pre-surgical patient education class with an additional long-term expectation module addressing recovery during the first 12 months after surgery was more effective in modifying participant’s pre-surgical expectations than participants receiving the standard pre-surgical education class alone. Prior to the class each participant completed one disease-specific instrument, a general-health survey, and a total-knee replacement expectation survey. After the class, each participant once again completed the total-knee replacement survey. Included in the study were 42 participants who were enrolled in a pre-surgical education course that was randomized. The participants in the control group received the standard pre-surgical education addressing pre-surgical topics. The participants in the intervention group received the standard pre-surgical education plus an additional module that specifically addressed long-term recovery and function up to 12 months post surgery. The primary outcome of the data revealed that participants’ who received the standard pre-surgical education with the additional module and who had an educational level higher than highschool, had expectations that were able to be modified to coincide with the surgeons’ expectations.
Nephrotic Sydrome Can Be a Marker for Prostatic Carcinoma  [PDF]
Natasha Takova, Alexander Otsetov
Modern Research in Inflammation (MRI) , 2017, DOI: 10.4236/mri.2017.64004
Abstract: Paraneoplastic syndromes (PS) represent a large spectrum of symptoms, associated with malignant diseases. PS can be diagnosed in asymptomatic patients with occult carcinoma, clinically active cancer, and during clinical remission, suggesting a recurrence of the neoplasm. The underlying mechanisms of PS are not completely understood but several authors have suggested that the increased production of biologically active immune factors and cytokines from the neoplastic cells may underlie the etiology of PS. Although rare, the renal involvement of patients with prostatic carcinoma has been reported. The most common paraneoplastic-associated glomerulopathy in prostatic cancer is the membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis with nephrotic syndrome (NS). In this review, we aimed to discuss the incidence of nephrotic syndrome secondary to prostatic carcinoma, its challenging diagnosis, clinical manifestation, and treatment.
Duration of remission after halving of the etanercept dose in patients with ankylosing spondylitis: a randomized, prospective, long-term, follow-up study
Cantini F, Niccoli L, Cassara E, Kaloudi O, Nannini C
Biologics: Targets and Therapy , 2013, DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/BTT.S31474
Abstract: ration of remission after halving of the etanercept dose in patients with ankylosing spondylitis: a randomized, prospective, long-term, follow-up study Original Research (1351) Total Article Views Authors: Cantini F, Niccoli L, Cassara E, Kaloudi O, Nannini C Published Date January 2013 Volume 2013:7 Pages 1 - 6 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/BTT.S31474 Received: 05 March 2012 Accepted: 04 December 2012 Published: 04 January 2013 Fabrizio Cantini, Laura Niccoli, Emanuele Cassarà, Olga Kaloudi, Carlotta Nannini Division of Rheumatology, Misericordia e Dolce Hospital, Prato, Italy Background: The aim of this study was to evaluate the proportion of patients with ankylosing spondylitis maintaining clinical remission after reduction of their subcutaneous etanercept dose to 50 mg every other week compared with that in patients receiving etanercept 50 mg weekly. Methods: In the first phase of this randomized, prospective, follow-up study, all biologic-na ve patients identified between January 2005 and December 2009 as satisfying the modified New York clinical criteria for ankylosing spondylitis treated with etanercept 50 mg weekly were evaluated for disease remission in January 2010. In the second phase, patients meeting the criteria for remission were randomized to receive subcutaneous etanercept as either 50 mg weekly or 50 mg every other week. The randomization allocation was 1:1. Remission was defined as Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index < 4, no extra-axial manifestations of peripheral arthritis, dactylitis, tenosynovitis, or iridocyclitis, and normal acute-phase reactants. The patients were assessed at baseline, at weeks 4 and 12, and every 12 weeks thereafter. The last visit constituted the end of the follow-up. Results: During the first phase, 78 patients with ankylosing spondylitis (57 males and 21 females, median age 38 years, median disease duration 12 years) were recruited. In January 2010, after a mean follow-up of 25 ± 11 months, 43 (55.1%) patients achieving clinical remission were randomized to one of the two treatment arms. Twenty-two patients received etanercept 50 mg every other week (group 1) and 21 received etanercept 50 mg weekly (group 2). At the end of follow-up, 19 of 22 (86.3%) subjects in group 1 and 19 of 21 (90.4%) in group 2 were still in remission, with no significant difference between the two groups. The mean follow-up duration in group 1 and group 2 was 22 ± 1 months and 21 ± 1.6 months, respectively. Conclusion: Remission of ankylosing spondylitis is possible in at least 50% of patients treated with etanercept 50 mg weekly. After halving of the etanercept dose, remission is maintained in a high percentage of patients during long-term follow-up, with important economic implications.
Duration of remission after halving of the etanercept dose in patients with ankylosing spondylitis: a randomized, prospective, long-term, follow-up study
Cantini F,Niccoli L,Cassara E,Kaloudi O
Biologics: Targets and Therapy , 2013,
Abstract: Fabrizio Cantini, Laura Niccoli, Emanuele Cassarà, Olga Kaloudi, Carlotta NanniniDivision of Rheumatology, Misericordia e Dolce Hospital, Prato, ItalyBackground: The aim of this study was to evaluate the proportion of patients with ankylosing spondylitis maintaining clinical remission after reduction of their subcutaneous etanercept dose to 50 mg every other week compared with that in patients receiving etanercept 50 mg weekly.Methods: In the first phase of this randomized, prospective, follow-up study, all biologic-na ve patients identified between January 2005 and December 2009 as satisfying the modified New York clinical criteria for ankylosing spondylitis treated with etanercept 50 mg weekly were evaluated for disease remission in January 2010. In the second phase, patients meeting the criteria for remission were randomized to receive subcutaneous etanercept as either 50 mg weekly or 50 mg every other week. The randomization allocation was 1:1. Remission was defined as Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index < 4, no extra-axial manifestations of peripheral arthritis, dactylitis, tenosynovitis, or iridocyclitis, and normal acute-phase reactants. The patients were assessed at baseline, at weeks 4 and 12, and every 12 weeks thereafter. The last visit constituted the end of the follow-up.Results: During the first phase, 78 patients with ankylosing spondylitis (57 males and 21 females, median age 38 years, median disease duration 12 years) were recruited. In January 2010, after a mean follow-up of 25 ± 11 months, 43 (55.1%) patients achieving clinical remission were randomized to one of the two treatment arms. Twenty-two patients received etanercept 50 mg every other week (group 1) and 21 received etanercept 50 mg weekly (group 2). At the end of follow-up, 19 of 22 (86.3%) subjects in group 1 and 19 of 21 (90.4%) in group 2 were still in remission, with no significant difference between the two groups. The mean follow-up duration in group 1 and group 2 was 22 ± 1 months and 21 ± 1.6 months, respectively.Conclusion: Remission of ankylosing spondylitis is possible in at least 50% of patients treated with etanercept 50 mg weekly. After halving of the etanercept dose, remission is maintained in a high percentage of patients during long-term follow-up, with important economic implications.Keywords: ankylosing spondylitis, anti-tumor necrosis factor, etanercept, remission, dose reduction
Detailed AGB evolutionary models and near infrared colours of intermediate-age stellar populations: Tests on star clusters
M. Salaris,A. Weiss,L. Cassara',L. Piovan,C. Chiosi
Physics , 2014, DOI: 10.1051/0004-6361/201423542
Abstract: We investigate the influence of Asymptotic Giant Branch stars on integrated colours of star clusters of ages between ~100 Myr and a few gigayears, and composition typical for the Magellanic Clouds. We use state-of-the-art stellar evolution models that cover the full thermal pulse phase, and take into account the influence of dusty envelopes on the emerging spectra. We present an alternative approach to the usual isochrone method, and compute integrated fluxes and colours using a Monte Carlo technique that enables us to take into account statistical fluctuations due to the typical small number of cluster stars. We demonstrate how the statistical variations in the number of Asymptotic Giant Branch stars and the temperature and luminosity variations during thermal pulses fundamentally limit the accuracy of the comparison (and calibration, for population synthesis models that require a calibration of the Asymptotic Giant Branch contribution to the total luminosity) with star cluster integrated photometries. When compared to observed integrated colours of individual and stacked clusters in the Magellanic Clouds, our predictions match well most of the observations, when statistical fluctuations are taken into account, although there are discrepancies in narrow age ranges with some (but not all) set of observations.
A numerical method for imaging of biological microstructures by VHF waves
Guido Ala,Pietro Cassara',Elisa Francomano,Salvatore Ganci
Physics , 2013,
Abstract: Imaging techniques give a fundamental support to medical diagnostics during the pathology discovery as well as for the characterization of biological structures. The imaging methods involve electromagnetic waves in a frequency range that spans from some Hz to GHz and over. Most of these methods involve scanning of wide human body areas even if only small areas need to be analyzed. In this paper, a numerical method to evaluate the shape of micro-structures for application in the medical ?field, with a very low invasiveness for the human body, is proposed. A flexible thin-wire antenna radiates the VHF waves and then, by measuring the spatial magnetic ?field distribution it is possible to reconstruct the micro-structures image by estimating the location of the antenna against a sensors panel. The typical inverse problem described above is solved numerically, and ?first simulation results are presented in order to show the validity and the robustness of the proposed approach.
Barriers and Facilitators to Community Mobility for Assistive Technology Users
Natasha Layton
Rehabilitation Research and Practice , 2012, DOI: 10.1155/2012/454195
Abstract: Mobility is frequently described in terms of individual body function and structures however contemporary views of disability also recognise the role of environment in creating disability. Aim. To identify consumer perspectives regarding barriers and facilitators to optimal mobility for a heterogeneous population of impaired Victorians who use assistive technology in their daily lives. Method. An accessible survey investigated the impact of supports or facilitators upon actual and desired life outcomes and health-related quality of life, from 100?AT users in Victoria, Australia. This paper reports upon data pertaining to community mobility. Results. A range of barriers and enablers to community mobility were identified including access to AT devices, environmental interventions, public transport, and inclusive community environs. Substantial levels of unmet need result in limited personal mobility and community participation. Outcomes fall short of many principles enshrined in current policy and human rights frameworks. Conclusion. AT devices as well as accessible and inclusive home and community environs are essential to maximizing mobility for many. Given the impact of the environment upon the capacity of individuals to realise community mobility, this raises the question as to whether rehabilitation practitioners, as well as prescribing AT devices, should work to build accessible communities via systemic advocacy. 1. Introduction Getting around at the home and in the community is a core activity, central to much human participation and therefore of key interest to rehabilitation practitioners. Identifying the constraints and supports which consumers perceive as impacting their current and desired life outcomes will both inform the work of rehabilitation practitioners and identify any barriers usually beyond the gaze of rehabilitation practice [1]. 1.1. Mobility Mobility, defined by the Oxford Dictionary of English [2] as the capacity to move, is a core element of human capacity. Independent mobility, preferably without the need for assistive technology (AT), is viewed as a key outcome measure, alongside communication and self-care, in the rehabilitation literature [3]. Health-related quality-of-life measures also regard the capacity to independently mobilize as a key indicator for quality of life [4, 5]. The extent of mobility will depend upon both the capacity of the person and the nature of the environments in which the person operates. A tension exists in considering the relationship between the person and the environment in which mobility takes
Weighted Hardy and Potential Operators in Morrey Spaces
Natasha Samko
Journal of Function Spaces and Applications , 2012, DOI: 10.1155/2012/678171
Abstract: We study the weighted →-boundedness of Hardy-type operators in Morrey spaces ?,(?) (or ?,(?1
Parameter depending almost monotonic functions and their applications to dimensions in metric measure spaces
Natasha Samko
Journal of Function Spaces and Applications , 2009, DOI: 10.1155/2009/929041
Abstract: In connection with application to various problems of operator theory, we study almost monotonic functions w(x, r) depending on a parameter x which runs a metric measure space X, and the so called index numbers m(w, x), M(w, x) of such functions, and consider some generalized Zygmund, Bary, Lozinskii and Stechkin conditions. The main results contain necessary and sufficient conditions, in terms of lower and upper bounds of indices m(w, x) and M(w, x) , for the uniform belongness of functions w(·, r) to Zygmund-Bary-Stechkin classes. We give also applications to local dimensions in metric measure spaces and characterization of some integral inequalities involving radial weights and measures of balls in such spaces.
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