oalib

Publish in OALib Journal

ISSN: 2333-9721

APC: Only $99

Submit

Any time

2019 ( 74 )

2018 ( 504 )

2017 ( 517 )

2016 ( 752 )

Custom range...

Search Results: 1 - 10 of 324874 matches for " Nakaaki S "
All listed articles are free for downloading (OA Articles)
Page 1 /324874
Display every page Item
Remembering and forgetting: directed forgetting effect in obsessive-compulsive disorder
Konishi M,Shishikura K,Nakaaki S,Komatsu S
Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment , 2011,
Abstract: Mika Konishi1, Kurie Shishikura2, Shutaro Nakaaki3, Shin-ichi Komatsu4, Masaru Mimura11Department of Neuropsychiatry, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo; 2Department of Neuropsychiatry, Kitasato University School of Medicine, Kanagawa; 3Department of Psychiatry and Cognitive-Behavioral Medicine, Nagoya City University Graduate School of Medical Science, Nagoya; 4Faculty of Education, Shinshu University, Nagano, JapanAbstract: It has been reported that episodic memory seems to be impaired in patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) because the patients repeat a specific checking behavior, but it is still unknown if OCD patients show memory impairments associated with their unique symptoms or not. To study episodic memory in OCD patients, we examined the directed forgetting effect. Patients with OCD and healthy control participants were given a list of 24 emotionally neutral everyday words (12 remember [R]-cued words and 12 forget [F]-cued words) under two conditions: List and Item. The results of our study showed that OCD patients recalled a number of F-cued words similar to that for controls and relatively fewer R-cued words than controls under both List and Item conditions. Consequently, the directed forgetting effect was smaller in OCD patients than controls. Our results demonstrated that both selective encoding and retrieval inhibition processes are impaired in OCD, and we suggest that recall of unfavorable items to be forgotten intruded into necessary items to be remembered. This impairment in episodic memory may partially account for some of the unique clinical symptoms of OCD.Keywords: episodic memory, retrieval inhibition, selective encoding
Decreased white matter integrity before the onset of delusions in patients with Alzheimer's disease: diffusion tensor imaging
Nakaaki S,Sato J,Torii K,Oka M
Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment , 2012,
Abstract: Shutaro Nakaaki,1 Junko Sato,2 Katsuyoshi Torii,2 Mizuki Oka,1 Atsushi Negi,2 Takashi Nakamae,3 Jin Narumoto,3 Jun Miyata,4 Toshi A Furukawa,5 Masaru Mimura11Department of Neuropsychiatry, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan; 2Department of Psychiatry and Cognitive-Behavioral Medicine, Nagoya City University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Nagoya, Japan; 3Department of Psychiatry, Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine, Kyoto, Japan; 4Department of Neuropsychiatry, Kyoto University, Kyoto, Japan; 5Department of Health Promotion and Human Behavior (Cognitive-Behavioral Medicine), Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine/School of Public Health, Kyoto, JapanBackground: The pathology of delusions in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) associated with white matter (WM) abnormalities is poorly understood. In addition, whether the abnormalities in WM integrity that underlie the delusions develop before the onset of the delusions remains unclear. In this study, we used a diffusion tensor imaging approach to examine the existence of baseline abnormalities in WM integrity in AD patients who developed delusions and AD patients who did not develop delusions.Methods: Using the Neuropsychiatric Inventory, we identified patients with AD who exhibit delusions during a 1-year period. All the patients underwent a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examination at baseline. We conducted fractional anisotropy using tract-based spatial statistics software and compared the results of AD patients who developed delusions with those who did not develop delusions.Results: Compared with the AD patients who did not develop delusions (n = 15), the AD patients who developed delusions (n = 10) exhibited two relatively large clusters and one minimal cluster of significantly lower fractional anisotropy results. The first cluster was located in the left parieto-occipital region and included several fibers: the left inferior longitudinal fasciculus, the inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus, the posterior corona radiate, and the forceps major of the corpus callosum. The second cluster was located on the body of the corpus callosum. A third minimal cluster was located on the superior temporal gyrus white matter.Conclusion: Abnormalities in WM integrity involving several fibers may be crucial to the development of delusions in AD patients.Keywords: Alzheimer's disease, white matter, DTI, delusions, tract-based spatial statistics
Neuroanatomical abnormalities before onset of delusions in patients with Alzheimer’s disease: a voxel-based morphometry study
Nakaaki S,Sato J,Torii K,Oka M
Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment , 2012,
Abstract: Shutaro Nakaaki,1 Junko Sato,2 Katsuyoshi Torii,2 Mizuki Oka,1 Atsushi Negi,2 Takashi Nakamae,3 Jin Narumoto,3 Jun Miyata,4 Toshi A Furukawa,5 Masaru Mimura11Department of Neuropsychiatry, Keio University School of Medicine, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo, 2Department of Psychiatry and Cognitive-Behavioral Medicine, Nagoya City University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Nagoya, 3Department of Psychiatry, Graduate School of Medical Science, Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine, Kyoto, 4Department of Neuropsychiatry, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, Kyoto, 5Department of Health Promotion and Human Behavior (Cognitive-Behavioral Medicine), Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine and Public Health, Kyoto, JapanBackground: Structural brain abnormalities associated with delusions in Alzheimer’s disease are poorly understood. In addition, whether the neural substrate underlying the delusions develops before the onset of the delusions is unclear. In this study, we used a voxel-based morphometry approach to examine the existence of regional structural abnormalities at baseline in patients with Alzheimer’s disease who did and who did not develop delusions.Methods: Using the Neuropsychiatric Inventory, we identified patients with Alzheimer’s disease who exhibited delusions during a 2-year period. All the patients had undergone a magnetic resonance imaging examination at the start of the study period (baseline). We conducted a voxel-based morphometry analysis using statistical parametric mapping (SPM5) software and compared the results of patients with Alzheimer’s disease who did and did not develop delusions.Results: Compared with the patients who did not develop delusions (n = 35), the patients who did develop delusions (n = 18) had significantly smaller gray matter volumes on both sides of the parahippocampal gyrus, the right posterior cingulate gyrus, the right orbitofrontal cortex, both sides of the inferior frontal cortex, the right anterior cingulate, and the left insula.Conclusion: Structural brain abnormalities involving both the frontal and medial temporal lobes may be crucial to the expression of delusions in patients with Alzheimer’s disease.Keywords: Alzheimer’s disease, delusions, structural brain abnormalities, voxel-based morphometry
Behavior management approach for agitated behavior in Japanese patients with dementia: a pilot study
Sato J,Nakaaki S,Torii K,Oka M
Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment , 2012,
Abstract: Junko Sato,1 Shutaro Nakaaki,2 Katsuyoshi Torii,1 Mizuki Oka,2 Atsushi Negi,1 Hiroshi Tatsumi,3 Jin Narumoto,4 Toshi A Furukawa,5 Masaru Mimura21Department of Psychiatry and Cognitive-Behavioral Medicine, Nagoya City University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Nagoya, 2Department of Neuropsychiatry, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo, 3Department of Health Science, Faculty of Psychological and Physical Science, Aichi Gakuin University, Nagoya, 4Department of Psychiatry, Graduate School of Medical Science, Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine, Kyoto, 5Department of Health Promotion and Human Behavior (Cognitive-Behavioral Medicine), Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine/School of Public Health, Kyoto, JapanBackground: Agitated behaviors are frequently observed in patients with dementia and can cause severe distress to caregivers. However, little evidence of the efficacy of nonpharmacological interventions for agitated behaviors exists for patients with dementia. The present pilot study aimed to evaluate a behavioral management program developed by the Seattle Protocols for patients with agitated behaviors in Japan.Methods: Eighteen patients with dementia (Alzheimer’s disease, n = 14; dementia with Lewy bodies, n = 4) participated in an open study testing the effectiveness of a behavioral management program. The intervention consisted of 20 sessions over the course of 3 months. The primary outcomes were severity of agitation in dementia, as measured using the Agitated Behavior in Dementia scale (ABID) and the Cohen-Mansfield Agitation Inventory (CMAI).Results: The behavioral management program resulted in significant reductions in total scores on both the ABID and CMAI. Although both physically agitated and verbally agitated behavior scores on the ABID improved significantly, symptoms of psychosis did not improve after the intervention.Conclusion: The behavioral management technique may be beneficial to distressed caregivers of patients with dementia. In the future, a well designed study to develop the behavioral management program more fully is needed.Keywords: Alzheimer’s disease, dementia with Lewy bodies, agitated behavior, behavioral management, Agitated Behavior in Dementia scale
Neuroanatomical abnormalities before onset of delusions in patients with Alzheimer’s disease: a voxel-based morphometry study
Nakaaki S, Sato J, Torii K, Oka M, Negi A, Nakamae T, Narumoto J, Miyata J, Furukawa TA, Mimura M
Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment , 2013, DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/NDT.S38939
Abstract: roanatomical abnormalities before onset of delusions in patients with Alzheimer’s disease: a voxel-based morphometry study Original Research (1086) Total Article Views Authors: Nakaaki S, Sato J, Torii K, Oka M, Negi A, Nakamae T, Narumoto J, Miyata J, Furukawa TA, Mimura M Published Date December 2012 Volume 2013:9 Pages 1 - 8 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/NDT.S38939 Received: 08 October 2012 Accepted: 26 November 2012 Published: 21 December 2012 Shutaro Nakaaki,1 Junko Sato,2 Katsuyoshi Torii,2 Mizuki Oka,1 Atsushi Negi,2 Takashi Nakamae,3 Jin Narumoto,3 Jun Miyata,4 Toshi A Furukawa,5 Masaru Mimura1 1Department of Neuropsychiatry, Keio University School of Medicine, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo, 2Department of Psychiatry and Cognitive-Behavioral Medicine, Nagoya City University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Nagoya, 3Department of Psychiatry, Graduate School of Medical Science, Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine, Kyoto, 4Department of Neuropsychiatry, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, Kyoto, 5Department of Health Promotion and Human Behavior (Cognitive-Behavioral Medicine), Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine and Public Health, Kyoto, Japan Background: Structural brain abnormalities associated with delusions in Alzheimer’s disease are poorly understood. In addition, whether the neural substrate underlying the delusions develops before the onset of the delusions is unclear. In this study, we used a voxel-based morphometry approach to examine the existence of regional structural abnormalities at baseline in patients with Alzheimer’s disease who did and who did not develop delusions. Methods: Using the Neuropsychiatric Inventory, we identified patients with Alzheimer’s disease who exhibited delusions during a 2-year period. All the patients had undergone a magnetic resonance imaging examination at the start of the study period (baseline). We conducted a voxel-based morphometry analysis using statistical parametric mapping (SPM5) software and compared the results of patients with Alzheimer’s disease who did and did not develop delusions. Results: Compared with the patients who did not develop delusions (n = 35), the patients who did develop delusions (n = 18) had significantly smaller gray matter volumes on both sides of the parahippocampal gyrus, the right posterior cingulate gyrus, the right orbitofrontal cortex, both sides of the inferior frontal cortex, the right anterior cingulate, and the left insula. Conclusion: Structural brain abnormalities involving both the frontal and medial temporal lobes may be crucial to the expression of delusions in patients with Alzheimer’s disease.
Decreased white matter integrity before the onset of delusions in patients with Alzheimer's disease: diffusion tensor imaging
Nakaaki S, Sato J, Torii K, Oka M, Negi A, Nakamae T, Narumoto J, Miyata J, Furukawa TA, Mimura M
Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment , 2013, DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/NDT.S38942
Abstract: reased white matter integrity before the onset of delusions in patients with Alzheimer's disease: diffusion tensor imaging Short Report (971) Total Article Views Authors: Nakaaki S, Sato J, Torii K, Oka M, Negi A, Nakamae T, Narumoto J, Miyata J, Furukawa TA, Mimura M Published Date December 2012 Volume 2013:9 Pages 25 - 29 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/NDT.S38942 Received: 08 October 2012 Accepted: 26 November 2012 Published: 27 December 2012 Shutaro Nakaaki,1 Junko Sato,2 Katsuyoshi Torii,2 Mizuki Oka,1 Atsushi Negi,2 Takashi Nakamae,3 Jin Narumoto,3 Jun Miyata,4 Toshi A Furukawa,5 Masaru Mimura1 1Department of Neuropsychiatry, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan; 2Department of Psychiatry and Cognitive-Behavioral Medicine, Nagoya City University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Nagoya, Japan; 3Department of Psychiatry, Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine, Kyoto, Japan; 4Department of Neuropsychiatry, Kyoto University, Kyoto, Japan; 5Department of Health Promotion and Human Behavior (Cognitive-Behavioral Medicine), Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine/School of Public Health, Kyoto, Japan Background: The pathology of delusions in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) associated with white matter (WM) abnormalities is poorly understood. In addition, whether the abnormalities in WM integrity that underlie the delusions develop before the onset of the delusions remains unclear. In this study, we used a diffusion tensor imaging approach to examine the existence of baseline abnormalities in WM integrity in AD patients who developed delusions and AD patients who did not develop delusions. Methods: Using the Neuropsychiatric Inventory, we identified patients with AD who exhibit delusions during a 1-year period. All the patients underwent a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examination at baseline. We conducted fractional anisotropy using tract-based spatial statistics software and compared the results of AD patients who developed delusions with those who did not develop delusions. Results: Compared with the AD patients who did not develop delusions (n = 15), the AD patients who developed delusions (n = 10) exhibited two relatively large clusters and one minimal cluster of significantly lower fractional anisotropy results. The first cluster was located in the left parieto-occipital region and included several fibers: the left inferior longitudinal fasciculus, the inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus, the posterior corona radiate, and the forceps major of the corpus callosum. The second cluster was located on the body of the corpus callosum. A third minimal cluster was located on the superior temporal gyrus white matter. Conclusion: Abnormalities in WM integrity involving several fibers may be crucial to the development of delusions in AD patients.
Behavior management approach for agitated behavior in Japanese patients with dementia: a pilot study
Sato J, Nakaaki S, Torii K, Oka M, Negi A, Tatsumi H, Narumoto J, Furukawa TA, Mimura M
Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment , 2013, DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/NDT.S38943
Abstract: ehavior management approach for agitated behavior in Japanese patients with dementia: a pilot study Short Report (1163) Total Article Views Authors: Sato J, Nakaaki S, Torii K, Oka M, Negi A, Tatsumi H, Narumoto J, Furukawa TA, Mimura M Published Date December 2012 Volume 2013:9 Pages 9 - 14 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/NDT.S38943 Received: 08 October 2012 Accepted: 28 November 2012 Published: 21 December 2012 Junko Sato,1 Shutaro Nakaaki,2 Katsuyoshi Torii,1 Mizuki Oka,2 Atsushi Negi,1 Hiroshi Tatsumi,3 Jin Narumoto,4 Toshi A Furukawa,5 Masaru Mimura2 1Department of Psychiatry and Cognitive-Behavioral Medicine, Nagoya City University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Nagoya, 2Department of Neuropsychiatry, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo, 3Department of Health Science, Faculty of Psychological and Physical Science, Aichi Gakuin University, Nagoya, 4Department of Psychiatry, Graduate School of Medical Science, Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine, Kyoto, 5Department of Health Promotion and Human Behavior (Cognitive-Behavioral Medicine), Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine/School of Public Health, Kyoto, Japan Background: Agitated behaviors are frequently observed in patients with dementia and can cause severe distress to caregivers. However, little evidence of the efficacy of nonpharmacological interventions for agitated behaviors exists for patients with dementia. The present pilot study aimed to evaluate a behavioral management program developed by the Seattle Protocols for patients with agitated behaviors in Japan. Methods: Eighteen patients with dementia (Alzheimer’s disease, n = 14; dementia with Lewy bodies, n = 4) participated in an open study testing the effectiveness of a behavioral management program. The intervention consisted of 20 sessions over the course of 3 months. The primary outcomes were severity of agitation in dementia, as measured using the Agitated Behavior in Dementia scale (ABID) and the Cohen-Mansfield Agitation Inventory (CMAI). Results: The behavioral management program resulted in significant reductions in total scores on both the ABID and CMAI. Although both physically agitated and verbally agitated behavior scores on the ABID improved significantly, symptoms of psychosis did not improve after the intervention. Conclusion: The behavioral management technique may be beneficial to distressed caregivers of patients with dementia. In the future, a well designed study to develop the behavioral management program more fully is needed.
Expression of endothelia and lymphocyte adhesion molecules in bronchus-associated lymphoid tissue (BALT) in adult human lung
Nakaaki Kawamata, Baohui Xu, Hiroo Nishijima, Kohji Aoyama, Mayumi Kusumoto, Toru Takeuchi, Chuwa Tei, Sara A Michie, Takami Matsuyama
Respiratory Research , 2009, DOI: 10.1186/1465-9921-10-97
Abstract: We immunostained frozen sections of BALT from lobectomy specimens from 17 patients with lung carcinoma with a panel of monoclonal antibodies to endothelia and lymphocyte adhesion molecules.Sections of BALT showed B cell follicles surrounded by T cells. Most BALT CD4+ T cells had a CD45RO+ memory phenotype. Almost all BALT B cells expressed α4 integrin and L-selectin. In contrast, 43% of BALT T cells expressed α4 integrin and 20% of BALT T cells expressed L-selectin. Almost all BALT lymphocytes expressed LFA-1. HEVs, which support the migration of lymphocytes from the bloodstream into secondary lymphoid tissues, were prominent in BALT. All HEVs expressed peripheral node addressin, most HEVs expressed vascular cell adhesion molecule-1, and no HEVs expressed mucosal addressin cell adhesion molecule-1.Human BALT expresses endothelia and lymphocyte adhesion molecules that may be important in recruiting naive and memory/effector lymphocytes to BALT during protective and pathologic bronchopulmonary immune responses.The lower respiratory tract is continually exposed to a wide variety of airborne antigens and microorganisms. The generation of rapid, specific adaptive immune responses to inhaled antigens and pathogens is critical for survival. Unfortunately, in some inflammatory and infectious diseases, such as asthma and tuberculosis, these immune responses can damage the lungs and bronchi. Thus, the bronchopulmonary adaptive immune system is involved in the maintenance of health and the development of diseases of the lower respiratory tract.In the initiation stage of an adaptive immune response, naive T cells migrate through blood vessel high endothelia venules (HEVs) into secondary lymphoid tissues, where they are stimulated by antigen-bearing dendritic cells. This leads to the generation of antigen-specific effector and memory T cells and B cells, which are released from the secondary lymphoid tissue into the bloodstream. In the effector stage of the adaptive immune respo
Degree Splitting of Root Square Mean Graphs  [PDF]
S. S. Sandhya, S. Somasundaram, S. Anusa
Applied Mathematics (AM) , 2015, DOI: 10.4236/am.2015.66086
Abstract: Let \"\" be an injective function. For a vertex labeling f, the induced edge labeling \"\" is defined by, \"\" or \"\"; then, the edge labels are distinct and are from \"\". Then f is called a root square mean labeling of G. In this paper, we prove root square mean labeling of some degree splitting graphs.
A Parameter Estimation Model of G-CSF: Mathematical Model of Cyclical Neutropenia  [PDF]
S. Balamuralitharan, S. Rajasekaran
American Journal of Computational Mathematics (AJCM) , 2012, DOI: 10.4236/ajcm.2012.21002
Abstract: We investigate the FFT (Fast Fourier Transform) model and G-CSF (granulocyte colony-stimulating factor) treatment of CN (Cyclical Neutropenia). We collect grey collies and normal dog’s data from CN and analyze the G-CSF treatment. The model develops the dynamics of circulating blood cells before and after the G-CSF treatment. This is quite natural and useful for the collection of laboratory data for investigation. The proposed interventions are practical. This reduces the quantity of G-CSF required for potential maintenance. This model gives us good result in treatment. The changes would be practical and reduce the risk side as well as the cost of treatment in G-CSF.
Page 1 /324874
Display every page Item


Home
Copyright © 2008-2017 Open Access Library. All rights reserved.