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Search Results: 1 - 10 of 470767 matches for " Michael J.G.;Amaral "
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An interactive key (Lucid) for the identifying of the genera of seed plants from the Ducke Reserve, Manaus, AM, Brazil
Bittrich, Volker;Souza, Clara Sampaio D.;Coelho, Rubens L.G.;Martins, Milena V.;Hopkins, Michael J.G.;Amaral, Maria C.E.;
Rodriguésia , 2012, DOI: 10.1590/S2175-78602012000100005
Abstract: the identification of amazonian plants is still difficult for many reasons, one being the lack of collections over large areas of the region. as a consequence of the poor knowledge on the amazonian flora, many taxonomic publications (revisions and floristic treatments) become out of date within a few years. in this context, the on-line publication of taxonomic treatises has been suggested, since it allows constant data updates; and this type of publication should therefore be more valued by the scientific community. an excellent field guide for the ducke reserve (manaus, central amazonian brazil) was published, based exclusively on vegetative characters. however, the presence of reproductive structures in the collected material does not facilitate identification with this type of field guide. furthermore, as in any printed key, the text cannot be updated, except through a new edition. as an example of a way to facilitate the identification of amazonian plants, an interactive, multiple-entry key to the seed plant genera that occur in the ducke reserve was created using the program lucid 3.5. the key includes vegetative and reproductive characters and many illustrations, and is available on-line. we discuss here the peculiarities and advantages of this type of electronic publication.
The origin of cortical neurons
Parnavelas, J.G.;
Brazilian Journal of Medical and Biological Research , 2002, DOI: 10.1590/S0100-879X2002001200003
Abstract: neurons of the mammalian cerebral cortex comprise two broad classes: pyramidal neurons, which project to distant targets, and the inhibitory nonpyramidal cells, the cortical interneurons. pyramidal neurons are generated in the germinal ventricular zone, which lines the lateral ventricles, and migrate along the processes of radial glial cells to their positions in the developing cortex in an `inside-out' sequence. the gaba-containing nonpyramidal cells originate for the most part in the ganglionic eminence, the primordium of the basal ganglia in the ventral telencephalon. these cells follow tangential migratory routes to enter the cortex and are in close association with the corticofugal axonal system. once they enter the cortex, they move towards the ventricular zone, possibly to obtain positional information, before they migrate radially in the direction of the pial surface to take up their positions in the developing cortex. the mechanisms that guide interneurons throughout these long and complex migratory routes are currently under investigation.
Oxidative stress: molecular perception and transduction of signals triggering antioxidant gene defenses
Scandalios, J.G.;
Brazilian Journal of Medical and Biological Research , 2005, DOI: 10.1590/S0100-879X2005000700003
Abstract: molecular oxygen (o2) is the premier biological electron acceptor that serves vital roles in fundamental cellular functions. however, with the beneficial properties of o2 comes the inadvertent formation of reactive oxygen species (ros) such as superoxide (o2·-), hydrogen peroxide, and hydroxyl radical (oh·). if unabated, ros pose a serious threat to or cause the death of aerobic cells. to minimize the damaging effects of ros, aerobic organisms evolved non-enzymatic and enzymatic antioxidant defenses. the latter include catalases, peroxidases, superoxide dismutases, and glutathione s-transferases (gst). cellular ros-sensing mechanisms are not well understood, but a number of transcription factors that regulate the expression of antioxidant genes are well characterized in prokaryotes and in yeast. in higher eukaryotes, oxidative stress responses are more complex and modulated by several regulators. in mammalian systems, two classes of transcription factors, nuclear factor kb and activator protein-1, are involved in the oxidative stress response. antioxidant-specific gene induction, involved in xenobiotic metabolism, is mediated by the "antioxidant responsive element" (are) commonly found in the promoter region of such genes. are is present in mammalian gst, metallothioneine-i and mnsod genes, but has not been found in plant gst genes. however, are is present in the promoter region of the three maize catalase (cat) genes. in plants, ros have been implicated in the damaging effects of various environmental stress conditions. many plant defense genes are activated in response to these conditions, including the three maize cat and some of the superoxide dismutase (sod) genes.
Biodiversity and environmental education: A contradiction?
J.G. Ferreira
Koers : Bulletin for Christian Scholarship , 2002, DOI: 10.4102/koers.v67i3.372
Abstract: The need for the maintenance of biodiversity has become a much-debated environmental concern. However, calling for continued biodiversity exposes one to potential accusations of caring more for the natural environment than for people. This article briefly reviews the development of environmental education and provides an overview of the concepts “biodiversity”, “sustainable development” and “sustainable consumption”. Reasons for maintaining biodiversity while simultaneously allowing for sustainable development and sustainable consumption are considered, but the main purpose of the article is to raise questions about current environmental education practice in South Africa and whether the concern of biodiversity is in actual fact addressed.
Filiation and alliance in three Bororo myths; a reconsideration of the social code in the first chapters of The raw and the cooked
J.G. Oosten
Bijdragen tot de Taal-, Land- en Volkenkunde , 1981,
Abstract:
A. van der Schoor, Het ontstaan van de middeleeuwse stad Rotterdam. Nederzettingsgeschiedenis in het Maas-Merwedegebied van ca. 400-1400. The origins of the Medieval town of Rotterdam. Settlement history in the Maas-Merwede region from ca. 400-1400
J.G. Kruisheer
BMGN : Low Countries Historical Review , 1995,
Abstract:
The origin of cortical neurons
Parnavelas J.G.
Brazilian Journal of Medical and Biological Research , 2002,
Abstract: Neurons of the mammalian cerebral cortex comprise two broad classes: pyramidal neurons, which project to distant targets, and the inhibitory nonpyramidal cells, the cortical interneurons. Pyramidal neurons are generated in the germinal ventricular zone, which lines the lateral ventricles, and migrate along the processes of radial glial cells to their positions in the developing cortex in an `inside-out' sequence. The GABA-containing nonpyramidal cells originate for the most part in the ganglionic eminence, the primordium of the basal ganglia in the ventral telencephalon. These cells follow tangential migratory routes to enter the cortex and are in close association with the corticofugal axonal system. Once they enter the cortex, they move towards the ventricular zone, possibly to obtain positional information, before they migrate radially in the direction of the pial surface to take up their positions in the developing cortex. The mechanisms that guide interneurons throughout these long and complex migratory routes are currently under investigation.
Darwin en onze voorouders. Nederlandse reacties op de evolutieleer 1860-1875. Een terreinverkenning
J.G. Hegeman
BMGN : Low Countries Historical Review , 1970,
Abstract:
De tijd van ontstaan van het oudste Goudse stadsrecht en van Gouda als stedelijke nederzetting
J.G. Kruisheer
BMGN : Low Countries Historical Review , 1993,
Abstract:
Oxidative stress: molecular perception and transduction of signals triggering antioxidant gene defenses
Scandalios J.G.
Brazilian Journal of Medical and Biological Research , 2005,
Abstract: Molecular oxygen (O2) is the premier biological electron acceptor that serves vital roles in fundamental cellular functions. However, with the beneficial properties of O2 comes the inadvertent formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) such as superoxide (O2·-), hydrogen peroxide, and hydroxyl radical (OH·). If unabated, ROS pose a serious threat to or cause the death of aerobic cells. To minimize the damaging effects of ROS, aerobic organisms evolved non-enzymatic and enzymatic antioxidant defenses. The latter include catalases, peroxidases, superoxide dismutases, and glutathione S-transferases (GST). Cellular ROS-sensing mechanisms are not well understood, but a number of transcription factors that regulate the expression of antioxidant genes are well characterized in prokaryotes and in yeast. In higher eukaryotes, oxidative stress responses are more complex and modulated by several regulators. In mammalian systems, two classes of transcription factors, nuclear factor kB and activator protein-1, are involved in the oxidative stress response. Antioxidant-specific gene induction, involved in xenobiotic metabolism, is mediated by the "antioxidant responsive element" (ARE) commonly found in the promoter region of such genes. ARE is present in mammalian GST, metallothioneine-I and MnSod genes, but has not been found in plant Gst genes. However, ARE is present in the promoter region of the three maize catalase (Cat) genes. In plants, ROS have been implicated in the damaging effects of various environmental stress conditions. Many plant defense genes are activated in response to these conditions, including the three maize Cat and some of the superoxide dismutase (Sod) genes.
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