oalib

Publish in OALib Journal

ISSN: 2333-9721

APC: Only $99

Submit

Any time

2020 ( 9 )

2019 ( 429 )

2018 ( 520 )

2017 ( 535 )

Custom range...

Search Results: 1 - 10 of 325608 matches for " Mette Ekn?s "
All listed articles are free for downloading (OA Articles)
Page 1 /325608
Display every page Item
Genome characteristics of primary carcinomas, local recurrences, carcinomatoses, and liver metastases from colorectal cancer patients
Chieu B Diep, Manuel R Teixeira, Lin Thorstensen, Johan N Wiig, Mette Ekns, Jahn M Nesland, Karl-Erik Giercksky, Bertil Johansson, Ragnhild A Lothe
Molecular Cancer , 2004, DOI: 10.1186/1476-4598-3-6
Abstract: The median number of aberrations among the primary carcinomas, local recurrences, carcinomatoses, and liver metastases was 10, 6, 13, and 14, respectively. Several genetic imbalances, such as gains of 7, 8q, 13q, and 20, and losses of 4q, 8p, 17p, and 18, were common in all groups. In contrast, gains of 5p and 12p were more common in the carcinomatoses than in other stages of the disease. With hierarchical cluster analysis, liver metastases could be divided into two main subgroups according to clusters of chromosome changes.Each stage of CRC progression is characterized by a particular genetic profile, and both carcinomatoses and liver metastases are more genetically complex than local recurrences and primary carcinomas. This is the first genome profiling of local recurrences and carcinomatoses, and gains of 5p and 12p seem to be particularly important for the spread of the CRC cells within the peritoneal cavity.More than a decade ago, a genetic model for the adenoma–carcinoma sequence in the large bowel was presented by Fearon and Vogelstein [1]. It is now widely accepted that colorectal cancer (CRC) arises through the accumulation of genetic and epigenetic changes [2]. The order as well as the number of events are important in the process that transform normal cells into neoplastic precursors and subsequently into malignant tumors, which may further metastasize [3]. Inactivation of tumorsupressor genes, APC and TP53, as well as components of mismatch repair system, is commonly found in colorectal tumors. A recent study suggest alternative molecular pathways for colorectal carcinomas based on the observation that APC, KRAS2, and TP53 are all frequently mutated but rarely in the same tumor [4]. Twelve to fifteen percent of all primary colorectal carcinomas display microsatellite instability [5-8], a result of defect mismatch repair [9]. The majority of colorectal carcinomas, however, harbor numerous aberrations at the chromosome level, and chromosomal instability se
Identification of Highly Methylated Genes across Various Types of B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma
Nicole Bethge, Hilde Honne, Vera Hilden, Gunhild Tr?en, Mette Ekns, Knut Liest?l, Harald Holte, Jan Delabie, Erlend B. Smeland, Guro E. Lind
PLOS ONE , 2013, DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0079602
Abstract: Epigenetic alterations of gene expression are important in the development of cancer. In this study, we identified genes which are epigenetically altered in major lymphoma types. We used DNA microarray technology to assess changes in gene expression after treatment of 11 lymphoma cell lines with epigenetic drugs. We identified 233 genes with upregulated expression in treated cell lines and with downregulated expression in B-cell lymphoma patient samples (n = 480) when compared to normal B cells (n = 5). The top 30 genes were further analyzed by methylation specific PCR (MSP) in 18 lymphoma cell lines. Seven of the genes were methylated in more than 70% of the cell lines and were further subjected to quantitative MSP in 37 B-cell lymphoma patient samples (diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (activated B-cell like and germinal center B-cell like subtypes), follicular lymphoma and Burkitt`s lymphoma) and normal B lymphocytes from 10 healthy donors. The promoters of DSP, FZD8, KCNH2, and PPP1R14A were methylated in 28%, 67%, 22%, and 78% of the 36 tumor samples, respectively, but not in control samples. Validation using a second series of healthy donor controls (n = 42; normal B cells, peripheral blood mononuclear cells, bone marrow, tonsils and follicular hyperplasia) and fresh-frozen lymphoma biopsies (n = 25), confirmed the results. The DNA methylation biomarker panel consisting of DSP, FZD8, KCNH2, and PPP1R14A was positive in 89% (54/61) of all lymphomas. Receiver operating characteristic analysis to determine the discriminative power between lymphoma and healthy control samples showed a c-statistic of 0.96, indicating a possible role for the biomarker panel in monitoring of lymphoma patients.
Hypermethylated MAL gene – a silent marker of early colon tumorigenesis
Guro E Lind, Terje Ahlquist, Matthias Kolberg, Marianne Berg, Mette Ekns, Miguel A Alonso, Anne Kallioniemi, Gunn I Meling, Rolf I Skotheim, Torleiv O Rognum, Espen Thiis-Evensen, Ragnhild A Lothe
Journal of Translational Medicine , 2008, DOI: 10.1186/1479-5876-6-13
Abstract: Using methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction (MSP) the promoter methylation status of MAL was analyzed in 218 samples, including normal mucosa (n = 44), colorectal adenomas (n = 63), carcinomas (n = 65), and various cancer cell lines (n = 46). Direct bisulphite sequencing was performed to confirm the MSP results. MAL gene expression was investigated with real time quantitative analyses before and after epigenetic drug treatment. Immunohistochemical analysis of MAL was done using normal colon mucosa samples (n = 5) and a tissue microarray with 292 colorectal tumors.Bisulphite sequencing revealed that the methylation was unequally distributed within the MAL promoter and by MSP analysis a region close to the transcription start point was shown to be hypermethylated in the majority of colorectal carcinomas (49/61, 80%) as well as in adenomas (45/63, 71%). In contrast, only a minority of the normal mucosa samples displayed hypermethylation (1/23, 4%). The hypermethylation of MAL was significantly associated with reduced or lost gene expression in in vitro models. Furthermore, removal of the methylation re-induced gene expression in colon cancer cell lines. Finally, MAL protein was expressed in epithelial cells of normal colon mucosa, but not in the malignant cells of the same type.Promoter hypermethylation of MAL was present in the vast majority of benign and malignant colorectal tumors, and only rarely in normal mucosa, which makes it suitable as a diagnostic marker for early colorectal tumorigenesis.Epigenetic changes – non-sequence-based alterations that are inherited through cell division [1] – are frequently seen in human cancers, and likewise as genetic alterations they may lead to disruption of gene function. In colorectal cancer, several tumour suppressor genes have been identified to be epigenetically inactivated by CpG island promoter hypermethylation, including the DNA mismatch repair gene MLH1 [2-4], the gatekeeper APC [5], and the cell cycle inhibito
Water intake in dairy goats – the effect of different types of roughages
Rebecca Ehrlenbruch,Margrete Ekns,Trude Pollen,Inger Lise Andersen
Italian Journal of Animal Science , 2010, DOI: 10.4081/ijas.2010.e76
Abstract: The aim of the current study was to investigate which type of roughage might influence the water intake in dairy goats. Eight goats were kept individually in single pens with one water bucket, with separated feeding table in order to register the drinking water intake, feed intake and milk yield for each goat. In experimental period 1 (3 days), four of the goats were fed hay and the remaining goats were fed silage, and vice versa in experimental period 2 (3 days). The goats drank more (P<0.0001) when they were eating hay compared to silage. Total water intake was higher (P<0.001) when they consumed silage than hay. The intake of silage was higher (P<0.0001) than for hay, but the opposite for dry matter intake. In conclusion, roughage type had an effect on water intake, with higher drinking water intake when fed hay than silage, but the opposite was true for total water intake.
Water intake in dairy goats – the effect of different types of roughages
Rebecca Ehrlenbruch,Margrete Ekns,Trude Pollen,Inger Lise Andersen
Italian Journal of Animal Science , 2012,
Abstract: The aim of the current study was to investigate which type of roughage might influence the water intake in dairy goats. Eight goats were kept individually in single pens with one water bucket, with separated feeding table in order to register the drinking water intake, feed intake and milk yield for each goat. In experimental period 1 (3 days), four of the goats were fed hay and the remaining goats were fed silage, and vice versa in experimental period 2 (3 days). The goats drank more (P<0.0001) when they were eating hay compared to silage. Total water intake was higher (P<0.001) when they consumed silage than hay. The intake of silage was higher (P<0.0001) than for hay, but the opposite for dry matter intake. In conclusion, roughage type had an effect on water intake, with higher drinking water intake when fed hay than silage, but the opposite was true for total water intake.
The Influence of Bovine Milk High or Low in Isoflavones on Hepatic Gene Expression in Mice
Mette T. Skaanild,Tina S. Nielsen
Journal of Toxicology , 2010, DOI: 10.1155/2010/423179
Abstract: Isoflavones have generated much attention due to their potential positive effects in various diseases. Phytoestrogens especially equol can be found in bovine milk, as feed ration for dairy cows is comprised of plants containing phytoestrogens. The aim of this study was to analyze the changes in hepatic gene expression after dietary intake of milk high and low in isoflavones. In addition to pelleted feed female NMRI mice were offered water, water added either 17 -estradiol, equol, Tween 80, and milk high and low in isoflavone content for a week. Gene expression was analyzed using an array qPCR kit. It was revealed that Tween 80 and 17 -estradiol upregulated both phase I and phase II genes to the same extent whereas equol alone, high and low isoflavone milk did not alter the expression of phase I genes but decreased the expression of phase II genes. This study shows that dietary isoflavones can regulate the transcription of especially phase II liver enzymes which potentially could give rise to an increase in reactive oxygen metabolites that may contribute to the development of cancer. 1. Introduction In recent years isoflavones (a group of phytoestrogens) have generated much attention both in science and in public due to their potential health beneficial effects in relation to diseases such as atherosclerosis, breast, endometrial, and prostate cancer, but also osteoporosis reviewed by Duncan et al., 2003 [1]. Especially leguminous plants, such as clover and soya bean, have high natural contents of phytoestrogens, the most predominant being daidzein, genistein, formononetin, and biochanin. These phytoestrogens can be found in bovine milk [2], as a large proportion of the feed ration for dairy cows is comprised of leguminous plants. Apart from these plant isoflavones, equol may also be present in bovine milk. Equol is produced from daidzein in the rumen of cows and the human intestine by the micro flora [3, 4]. Equol is of special interest since it may directly exert cancer preventive effects [5]. However, only about one third of people in the Western populations can produce equol, likely due to the large interindividual variability in the intestinal flora. As isoflavones can change the phase 1 and phase 2 metabolisms [6], they have the potential to change the metabolism of endogenous compounds such as hormones and xenobiotic compounds including drugs. This may cause a change in homeostasis and/or change the oxidative tress of liver which may give rise to cancer. Most of these studies, however, have been made in vitro. A recent in vivo study revealed that
Existing data sources for clinical epidemiology: The North Denmark Bacteremia Research Database
Henrik C Sch nheyder, Mette S gaard
Clinical Epidemiology , 2010, DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/CLEP.S10139
Abstract: ting data sources for clinical epidemiology: The North Denmark Bacteremia Research Database Methodology (3520) Total Article Views Authors: Henrik C Sch nheyder, Mette S gaard Published Date June 2010 Volume 2010:2 Pages 171 - 178 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/CLEP.S10139 Henrik C Sch nheyder1, Mette S gaard1,2 1Department of Clinical Microbiology, Aalborg Hospital, Aarhus University Hospital, Aalborg, Denmark; 2Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark Abstract: Bacteremia is associated with high morbidity and mortality. Improving prevention and treatment requires better knowledge of the disease and its prognosis. However, in order to study the entire spectrum of bacteremia patients, we need valid sources of information, prospective data collection, and complete follow-up. In North Denmark Region, all patients diagnosed with bacteremia have been registered in a population-based database since 1981. The information has been recorded prospectively since 1992 and the main variables are: the patient’s unique civil registration number, date of sampling the first positive blood culture, date of admission, clinical department, date of notification of growth, place of acquisition, focus of infection, microbiological species, antibiogram, and empirical antimicrobial treatment. During the time from 1981 to 2008, information on 22,556 cases of bacteremia has been recorded. The civil registration number makes it possible to link the database to other medical databases and thereby build large cohorts with detailed longitudinal data that include hospital histories since 1977, comorbidity data, and complete follow-up of survival. The database is suited for epidemiological research and, presently, approximately 60 studies have been published. Other Danish departments of clinical microbiology have recently started to record the same information and a population base of 2.3 million will be available for future studies.
Replication of Prostate Cancer Risk Variants in a Danish Case-Control Association Study  [PDF]
Diem Nguyen Bentzon, Mette Nyegaard, Anders B?rglum, Torben ?rntoft, Michael Borre, Karina Dalsgaard S?rensen
Open Journal of Urology (OJU) , 2012, DOI: 10.4236/oju.2012.22009
Abstract: Background: Prostate cancer is one of the main causes for cancer morbidity and mortality in Western countries. Recently, several single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with prostate cancer have been identified in genome-wide association studies and multiple variant models have been developed to predict prostate cancer risk. The association between genetic markers and clinico-pathological tumor variables has, however, been inconsistent. Methods and Materials: A total of 32 previously identified prostate cancer-associated risk SNPs were genotyped in 648 prostate cancer cases and 526 age-matched controls. Family history was obtained by questionnaire. Age at diagnosis, clinical tumor variables including pre- and postoperative PSA, Gleason score, and T stage were obtained from prospectively collected clinical data (Aarhus Prostate Cancer Study). The SNPs were genotyped using Sequenom and Taqman assays and associations between SNPs, prostate cancer risk, and clinico-pathological variables were assessed. Results: Seventeen SNPs were successfully replicated in our case-control study and the association estimates were consistent with previous reports. Four markers were excluded from further analysis due to linkage disequilibrium. The cumulative effect of having the disease-associated genotype at five SNPs (rs4430796, rs6983267, rs1859962, rs1447295 and rs16901979) increased the prostate cancer risk with odds ratio 6.02 (95% CI: 2.21 - 16.38; P = 1.0 × 10–4) in patients with any combination of ≥4 markers compared with patients without any of the five SNPs (P for trend = 1.0 × 10–4). Six markers were significantly associated with clinico-pathological variables: SNP rs2735839 (GG) at locus 19q13, which is in the KLK3 gene encoding PSA, was associated with high preoperative PSA (P = 0.04), low Gleason score (P = 0.01) and low T stage (P = 0.02). Variants rs5759167 (GG/GT) (22q13) and rs7679673 (CC/CA) (4q24) were correlated with low risk for biochemical relapse (P = 0.015 and P = 0.009, respectively), whereas rs6983267 (GG) (8q24) was significantly associated with biochemical recurrence (P = 0.045). In addition, variants rs6983267 (GG) and rs5759167 (GG/GT) were significantly associated with negative family history (P = 0.04 and P = 0.02, respectively). Conclusion: We replicated 17 previously identified prostate cancer-associated risk SNPs in a Danish case-control study and found a cumulative and significant association between five SNPs and prostate cancer. Overall, we
Prognosis of ovarian cancer subsequent to venous thromboembolism: a nationwide Danish cohort study
Mette S Tetsche, Mette N?rgaard, Lars Pedersen, Timothy L Lash, Henrik T S?rensen
BMC Cancer , 2006, DOI: 10.1186/1471-2407-6-189
Abstract: We identified 12,835 ovarian cancer patients diagnosed from 1980 to 2003 in the Danish Cancer Registry and obtained information on previous primary VTE diagnosis from the Danish National Hospital Discharge Registry. Ovarian cancer patients with previous VTE related to other cancers, surgery, or pregnancy were excluded. The vital status was determined by linking data to the Civil Registration System.We identified 50 ovarian cancer patients diagnosed less than 4 months after the VTE and 78 ovarian cancer patients diagnosed more than 4 months after the VTE diagnosis. Advanced stages tended to be more common among patients with VTE. One-year survivals were 44% and 54% among the two VTE groups, compared with 63% among patients without VTE. Adjusted (for age, calendar time, comorbidity, and FIGO-stage) mortality ratios were 1.7 (95% CI = 1.2–2.5) and 1.2 (95% CI = 0.8–1.7), respectively.Ovarian cancer diagnosed less than four months before VTE is associated with an advanced stage and a poorer prognosis.Ovarian cancer has a poor prognosis, and is frequently complicated by venous thromboembolic events (VTE) [1-3]. About 70% of ovarian cancers are diagnosed at an advanced stage [4,5], and advanced stage seems to be associated with higher risk of thromboembolic events [6]. Occasionally, VTE occurs prior to cancer diagnosis and research suggests that VTE may occur as a consequence of an underlying, undiagnosed cancer [7,8].A recently published, large population-based, study found that the incidence of unprovoked VTE was almost three times higher in the year preceding ovarian cancer diagnosis [9]. However, a paucity of research has investigated the effect of VTE on ovarian cancer prognosis. Sorensen et al [6] reported poorer prognosis among cancer patients following a thrombolic event, however they did not examine the prognosis for individual cancer sites. Moreover, it is not clear how the prognosis of ovarian cancer patients is affected by the timing of the thromboembolic even
Blood culture status and mortality among patients with suspected community-acquired bacteremia: a population-based cohort study
Mette S?gaard, Mette N?rgaard, Lars Pedersen, Henrik T S?rensen, Henrik C Sch?nheyder
BMC Infectious Diseases , 2011, DOI: 10.1186/1471-2334-11-139
Abstract: This cohort study included 29,273 adults with blood cultures performed within the first 2 days following hospital admission to an internal medical ward in northern Denmark during 1995-2006. We computed product limit estimates and used Cox regression to compute adjusted mortality rate ratios (MRRs) within 0-2, 3-7, 8-30, and 31-180 days following admission for bacteremia patients compared to culture-negative patients.Mortality in 2,648 bacteremic patients and 26,625 culture-negative patients was 4.8% vs. 2.0% 0-2 days after admission, 3.7% vs. 2.7% 3-7 days after admission, 5.6% vs. 5.1% 8-30 days after admission, and 9.7% vs. 8.7% 31-180 days after admission, corresponding to adjusted MRRs of 1.9 (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.6-2.2), 1.1 (95% CI: 0.9-1.5), 0.9 (95% CI: 0.8-1.1), and 1.0 (95% CI: 0.8-1.1), respectively. Mortality was higher among patients with Gram-positive (adjusted 0-2-day MRR 1.9, 95% CI: 1.6-2.2) and polymicrobial bacteremia (adjusted 0-2-day MRR 3.5, 95% CI: 2.2-5.5) than among patients with Gram-negative bacteremia (adjusted 0-2-day MRR 1.5, 95% CI 1.2-2.0). After the first 2 days, patients with Gram-negative bacteremia had the same risk of dying as culture-negative patients (adjusted MRR 0.8, 95% CI: 0.5-1.1). Only patients with polymicrobial bacteremia had increased mortality within 31-180 days following admission (adjusted MRR 1.3, 95% CI: 0.8-2.1) compared to culture-negative patients. The association between blood culture status and mortality did not differ substantially by level of comorbidity.Community-acquired bacteremia was associated with an increased risk of mortality in the first week of medical ward admission. Higher mortality among patients with Gram-positive and polymicrobial bacteremia compared with patients with Gram-negative bacteremia and negative cultures emphasizes the prognostic importance of these infections.Community-acquired bacteremia is a serious condition with a hospitalization rate of approximately 80 per 100,000
Page 1 /325608
Display every page Item


Home
Copyright © 2008-2017 Open Access Library. All rights reserved.