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Search Results: 1 - 10 of 2839 matches for " Matteo Monami "
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Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 and Diabetes
Matteo Monami
Experimental Diabetes Research , 2011, DOI: 10.1155/2011/901954
Abstract:
Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 and Diabetes
Matteo Monami
Journal of Diabetes Research , 2011, DOI: 10.1155/2011/901954
Abstract:
Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 and Diabetes 2012
Matteo Monami,Giovanni Di Pasquale,Anne Rowzee,Carlo Maria Rotella
Experimental Diabetes Research , 2012, DOI: 10.1155/2012/768760
Abstract:
Effects of Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 Receptor Agonists on Body Weight: A Meta-Analysis
Matteo Monami,Ilaria Dicembrini,Niccolò Marchionni,Carlo M. Rotella,Edoardo Mannucci
Experimental Diabetes Research , 2012, DOI: 10.1155/2012/672658
Abstract: Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 receptor agonists (GLP-1RAs), approved as glucose-lowering drugs for the treatment of type 2 diabetes, have also been shown to reduce body weight. An extensive Medline, Cochrane database, and Embase search for “exenatide,” “liraglutide,” “albiglutide,” “semaglutide,” and “lixisenatide” was performed, collecting all randomized clinical trials on humans up to December 15, 2011, with a duration of at least 24 weeks, comparing GLP-1 receptor agonists with either placebo or active drugs. Twenty two (7,859 patients) and 7 (2,416 patients) trials with available results on body weight at 6 and 12 months, respectively, were included. When compared with placebo, GLP-1RAs determine a reduction of BMI at 6 months of −1.0 [−1.3; −0.6] kg/m2. Considering the average BMI at baseline (32.4 kg/m2) these data means a weight reduction of about 3% at 6 months. This result could seem modest from a clinical standpoint; however, it could be affected by many factors contributing to an underestimation of the effect of GLP-1RA on body weight, such as non adequate doses, inclusion criteria, efficacy of GLP-1RA on reducing glycosuria, and association to non-pharmacological interventions not specifically aimed to weight reduction.
Effects of Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 Receptor Agonists on Body Weight: A Meta-Analysis
Matteo Monami,Ilaria Dicembrini,Niccolò Marchionni,Carlo M. Rotella,Edoardo Mannucci
Journal of Diabetes Research , 2012, DOI: 10.1155/2012/672658
Abstract: Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 receptor agonists (GLP-1RAs), approved as glucose-lowering drugs for the treatment of type 2 diabetes, have also been shown to reduce body weight. An extensive Medline, Cochrane database, and Embase search for “exenatide,” “liraglutide,” “albiglutide,” “semaglutide,” and “lixisenatide” was performed, collecting all randomized clinical trials on humans up to December 15, 2011, with a duration of at least 24 weeks, comparing GLP-1 receptor agonists with either placebo or active drugs. Twenty two (7,859 patients) and 7 (2,416 patients) trials with available results on body weight at 6 and 12 months, respectively, were included. When compared with placebo, GLP-1RAs determine a reduction of BMI at 6 months of ?1.0 [?1.3; ?0.6]?kg/m2. Considering the average BMI at baseline (32.4?kg/m2) these data means a weight reduction of about 3% at 6 months. This result could seem modest from a clinical standpoint; however, it could be affected by many factors contributing to an underestimation of the effect of GLP-1RA on body weight, such as non adequate doses, inclusion criteria, efficacy of GLP-1RA on reducing glycosuria, and association to non-pharmacological interventions not specifically aimed to weight reduction. 1. Introduction Most drugs developed for the therapy of obesity have failed to show a sufficient efficacy and safety for long-term treatment. In particular, agents which stimulate energy expenditure (e.g., thyroid hormones, sympathoadrenergic drugs, or sibutramine) do not have an adequate cardiovascular safety, whereas centrally acting anorexants either are ineffective in the long term (e.g., serotonin reuptake inhibitors) or show neuropsychiatric adverse effects (e.g., amphetamine derivatives or cannabinoid receptor antagonists) [1]. As a result, orlistat, which inhibits lipid absorption, is the only available drug for obesity in many countries. Even for drugs which do not show relevant problems of long-term safety, such as orlistat, the unsatisfactory tolerability profile limits clinical use. Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is a gastrointestinal hormone, produced mainly in the postprandial phase, which stimulates insulin secretion and inhibits glucagon release in a dose-dependent fashion [2]. Due to this properties, the hormone reduces hyperglycemia without inducing hypoglycemia in patients with type 2 diabetes [3]. The rapid inactivation of GLP-1 in vivo and the consequent short half-life (a few minutes after subcutaneous administration) prevents its therapeutic use. Long-acting GLP-1 receptor agonists, which can be administered
Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 and Diabetes 2012
Matteo Monami,Giovanni Di Pasquale,Anna Rowzee,Carlo Maria Rotella,Edoardo Mannucci
Journal of Diabetes Research , 2012, DOI: 10.1155/2012/768760
Abstract:
Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 Receptor Agonists and Cardiovascular Events: A Meta-Analysis of Randomized Clinical Trials
Matteo Monami,Francesco Cremasco,Caterina Lamanna,Claudia Colombi,Carla Maria Desideri,Iacopo Iacomelli,Niccolò Marchionni,Edoardo Mannucci
Experimental Diabetes Research , 2011, DOI: 10.1155/2011/215764
Abstract: Objective. Data from randomized clinical trials with metabolic outcomes can be used to address concerns about potential issues of cardiovascular safety for newer drugs for type 2 diabetes. This meta-analysis was designed to assess cardiovascular safety of GLP-1 receptor agonists. Design and Methods. MEDLINE, Embase, and Cochrane databases were searched for randomized trials of GLP-1 receptor agonists (versus placebo or other comparators) with a duration ≥12 weeks, performed in type 2 diabetic patients. Mantel-Haenszel odds ratio with 95% confidence interval (MH-OR) was calculated for major cardiovascular events (MACE), on an intention-to-treat basis, excluding trials with zero events. Results. Out of 36 trials, 20 reported at least one MACE. The MH-OR for all GLP-1 receptor agonists was 0.74 (0.50–1.08), =.12 (0.85 (0.50–1.45), =.55, and 0.69 (0.40–1.22), =.20, for exenatide and liraglutide, resp.). Corresponding figures for placebo-controlled and active comparator studies were 0.46 (0.25–0.83), =.009, and 1.05 (0.63–1.76), =.84, respectively. Conclusions. To date, results of randomized trials do not suggest any detrimental effect of GLP-1 receptor agonists on cardiovascular events. Specifically designed longer-term trials are needed to verify the possibility of a beneficial effect.
Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 Receptor Agonists and Cardiovascular Events: A Meta-Analysis of Randomized Clinical Trials
Matteo Monami,Francesco Cremasco,Caterina Lamanna,Claudia Colombi,Carla Maria Desideri,Iacopo Iacomelli,Niccolò Marchionni,Edoardo Mannucci
Journal of Diabetes Research , 2011, DOI: 10.1155/2011/215764
Abstract: Objective. Data from randomized clinical trials with metabolic outcomes can be used to address concerns about potential issues of cardiovascular safety for newer drugs for type 2 diabetes. This meta-analysis was designed to assess cardiovascular safety of GLP-1 receptor agonists. Design and Methods. MEDLINE, Embase, and Cochrane databases were searched for randomized trials of GLP-1 receptor agonists (versus placebo or other comparators) with a duration ≥12 weeks, performed in type 2 diabetic patients. Mantel-Haenszel odds ratio with 95% confidence interval (MH-OR) was calculated for major cardiovascular events (MACE), on an intention-to-treat basis, excluding trials with zero events. Results. Out of 36 trials, 20 reported at least one MACE. The MH-OR for all GLP-1 receptor agonists was 0.74 (0.50–1.08), (0.85 (0.50–1.45), , and 0.69 (0.40–1.22), , for exenatide and liraglutide, resp.). Corresponding figures for placebo-controlled and active comparator studies were 0.46 (0.25–0.83), , and 1.05 (0.63–1.76), , respectively. Conclusions. To date, results of randomized trials do not suggest any detrimental effect of GLP-1 receptor agonists on cardiovascular events. Specifically designed longer-term trials are needed to verify the possibility of a beneficial effect. 1. Introduction Cardiovascular safety is a growing concern for drugs used for chronic conditions, such as diabetes. Among glucose-lowering agents, sulfonylureas [1, 2], insulin [3, 4], and thiazolidinediones [5–7], have been suspected of adverse cardiovascular effects, although some of those preoccupations have not been confirmed [8–11]. Following these concerns, the Food and Drug Administration issued a guidance for companies submitting new chemical entities as treatments for type 2 diabetes, requiring that, either in phase II-III trials, or in a subsequent phase IV specifically designed randomized clinical trial, a sufficient amount of information is collected so as to exclude a risk increase of over 30% (i.e., the upper limit—two-sided—of 95% confidence interval for major cardiovascular events, in comparison with placebo and/or other treatments, should not exceed 1.30; http://www.fda.gov/downloads/Drugs/GuidanceComplianceRegulatoryInformation/Guidances/UCM071627.pdf). Two GLP-1 receptor agonists (exenatide and liraglutide) have been approved for human use, and several others are currently under clinical development. It has been observed that chronic stimulation of GLP-1 receptors could produce beneficial effects on several cardiovascular risk factors [12]; furthermore, preliminary data on
Adipokines as Possible New Predictors of Cardiovascular Diseases: A Case Control Study
Laura Pala,Matteo Monami,Silvia Ciani,Ilaria Dicembrini,Alessandro Pasqua,Anna Pezzatini,Paolo Francesconi,Barbara Cresci,Edoardo Mannucci,Carlo Maria Rotella
Journal of Nutrition and Metabolism , 2012, DOI: 10.1155/2012/253428
Abstract: Background and Aims. The secretion of several adipocytokines, such as adiponectin, retinol-binding protein 4 (RBP4), adipocyte fatty acid binding protein (aFABP), and visfatin, is altered in subjects with abdominal adiposity; these endocrine alterations could contribute to increased cardiovascular risk. The aim of the study was to assess the relationship among adiponectin, RBP4, aFABP, and visfatin, and incident cardiovascular disease. Methods and Results. A case-control study, nested within a prospective cohort, on 2945 subjects enrolled for a diabetes screening program was performed. We studied 18 patients with incident fatal or nonfatal IHD (Ischemic Heart Disease) or CVD (Cerebrovascular Disease), compared with 18 matched control subjects. Circulating adiponectin levels were significantly lower in cases of IHD with respect to controls. Circulating RBP4 levels were significantly increased in CVD and decreased in IHD with respect to controls. Circulating aFABP4 levels were significantly increased in CVD, while no difference was associated with IHD. Circulating visfatin levels were significantly lower in cases of both CVD and IHD with respect to controls, while no difference was associated with CVD. Conclusions. The present study confirms that low adiponectin is associated with increased incidents of IHD, but not CVD, and suggests, for the first time, a major effect of visfatin, aFABP, and RBP4 in the development of cardiovascular disease.
Glucagon-Like Peptide-1, Diabetes, and Cognitive Decline: Possible Pathophysiological Links and Therapeutic Opportunities
Enrico Mossello,Elena Ballini,Marta Boncinelli,Matteo Monami,Giuseppe Lonetto,Anna Maria Mello,Francesca Tarantini,Samuele Baldasseroni,Edoardo Mannucci,Niccolò Marchionni
Experimental Diabetes Research , 2011, DOI: 10.1155/2011/281674
Abstract: Metabolic and neurodegenerative disorders have a growing prevalence in Western countries. Available epidemiologic and neurobiological evidences support the existence of a pathophysiological link between these conditions. Glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1), whose activity is reduced in insulin resistance, has been implicated in central nervous system function, including cognition, synaptic plasticity, and neurogenesis. We review the experimental researches suggesting that GLP-1 dysfunction might be a mediating factor between Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and neurodegeneration. Drug treatments enhancing GLP-1 activity hold out hope for treatment and prevention of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and cognitive decline.
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