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Search Results: 1 - 10 of 298575 matches for " Matt J. Keeling "
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The Impact of Contact Tracing in Clustered Populations
Thomas House ,Matt J. Keeling
PLOS Computational Biology , 2010, DOI: 10.1371/journal.pcbi.1000721
Abstract: The tracing of potentially infectious contacts has become an important part of the control strategy for many infectious diseases, from early cases of novel infections to endemic sexually transmitted infections. Here, we make use of mathematical models to consider the case of partner notification for sexually transmitted infection, however these models are sufficiently simple to allow more general conclusions to be drawn. We show that, when contact network structure is considered in addition to contact tracing, standard “mass action” models are generally inadequate. To consider the impact of mutual contacts (specifically clustering) we develop an improvement to existing pairwise network models, which we use to demonstrate that ceteris paribus, clustering improves the efficacy of contact tracing for a large region of parameter space. This result is sometimes reversed, however, for the case of highly effective contact tracing. We also develop stochastic simulations for comparison, using simple re-wiring methods that allow the generation of appropriate comparator networks. In this way we contribute to the general theory of network-based interventions against infectious disease.
Epidemic prediction and control in clustered populations
Thomas House,Matt J Keeling
Quantitative Biology , 2010,
Abstract: There has been much recent interest in modelling epidemics on networks, particularly in the presence of substantial clustering. Here, we develop pairwise methods to answer questions that are often addressed using epidemic models, in particular: on the basis of potential observations early in an outbreak, what can be predicted about the epidemic outcomes and the levels of intervention necessary to control the epidemic? We find that while some results are independent of the level of clustering (early growth predicts the level of `leaky' vaccine needed for control and peak time, while the basic reproductive ratio predicts the random vaccination threshold) the relationship between other quantities is very sensitive to clustering.
Exact and approximate moment closures for non-Markovian network epidemics
Lorenzo Pellis,Thomas House,Matt J. Keeling
Quantitative Biology , 2015,
Abstract: Moment-closure techniques are commonly used to generate low-dimensional deterministic models to approximate the average dynamics of stochastic systems on networks. The quality of such closures is usually difficult to asses and the relationship between model assumptions and closure accuracy are often difficult, if not impossible, to quantify. Here we carefully examine some commonly used moment closures, in particular a new one based on the concept of maximum entropy, for approximating the spread of epidemics on networks by reconstructing the probability distributions over triplets based on those over pairs. We consider various models (SI, SIR, SEIR and Reed-Frost-type) under Markovian and non-Markovian assumption characterising the latent and infectious periods. We initially study two special networks, namely the open triplet and closed triangle, for which we can obtain analytical results. We then explore numerically the exactness of moment closures for a wide range of larger motifs, thus gaining understanding of the factors that introduce errors in the approximations, in particular the presence of a random duration of the infectious period and the presence of overlapping triangles in a network. We also derive a simpler and more intuitive proof than previously available concerning the known result that pair-based moment closure is exact for the Markovian SIR model on tree-like networks under pure initial conditions. We also extend such a result to all infectious models, Markovian and non-Markovian, in which susceptibles escape infection independently from each infected neighbour and for which infectives cannot regain susceptible status, provided the network is tree-like and initial conditions are pure. This works represent a valuable step in deepening understanding of the assumptions behind moment closure approximations and for putting them on a more rigorous mathematical footing.
Appropriate Models for the Management of Infectious Diseases
Helen J Wearing ,Pejman Rohani,Matt J Keeling
PLOS Medicine , 2005, DOI: 10.1371/journal.pmed.0020174
Abstract: Background Mathematical models have become invaluable management tools for epidemiologists, both shedding light on the mechanisms underlying observed dynamics as well as making quantitative predictions on the effectiveness of different control measures. Here, we explain how substantial biases are introduced by two important, yet largely ignored, assumptions at the core of the vast majority of such models. Methods and Findings First, we use analytical methods to show that (i) ignoring the latent period or (ii) making the common assumption of exponentially distributed latent and infectious periods (when including the latent period) always results in underestimating the basic reproductive ratio of an infection from outbreak data. We then proceed to illustrate these points by fitting epidemic models to data from an influenza outbreak. Finally, we document how such unrealistic a priori assumptions concerning model structure give rise to systematically overoptimistic predictions on the outcome of potential management options. Conclusion This work aims to highlight that, when developing models for public health use, we need to pay careful attention to the intrinsic assumptions embedded within classical frameworks.
Correction: Appropriate Models for the Management of Infectious Diseases
Helen J Wearing,Pejman Rohani,Matt J Keeling
PLOS Medicine , 2005, DOI: 10.1371/journal.pmed.0020320
Abstract:
Appropriate models for the management of infectious diseases.
Wearing Helen J,Rohani Pejman,Keeling Matt J
PLOS Medicine , 2005,
Abstract: BACKGROUND: Mathematical models have become invaluable management tools for epidemiologists, both shedding light on the mechanisms underlying observed dynamics as well as making quantitative predictions on the effectiveness of different control measures. Here, we explain how substantial biases are introduced by two important, yet largely ignored, assumptions at the core of the vast majority of such models. METHODS AND FINDINGS: First, we use analytical methods to show that (i) ignoring the latent period or (ii) making the common assumption of exponentially distributed latent and infectious periods (when including the latent period) always results in underestimating the basic reproductive ratio of an infection from outbreak data. We then proceed to illustrate these points by fitting epidemic models to data from an influenza outbreak. Finally, we document how such unrealistic a priori assumptions concerning model structure give rise to systematically overoptimistic predictions on the outcome of potential management options. CONCLUSION: This work aims to highlight that, when developing models for public health use, we need to pay careful attention to the intrinsic assumptions embedded within classical frameworks.
Calculation of Disease Dynamics in a Population of Households
Joshua V. Ross,Thomas House,Matt J. Keeling
PLOS ONE , 2012, DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0009666
Abstract: Early mathematical representations of infectious disease dynamics assumed a single, large, homogeneously mixing population. Over the past decade there has been growing interest in models consisting of multiple smaller subpopulations (households, workplaces, schools, communities), with the natural assumption of strong homogeneous mixing within each subpopulation, and weaker transmission between subpopulations. Here we consider a model of SIRS (susceptible-infectious-recovered-suscep?tible)infection dynamics in a very large (assumed infinite) population of households, with the simplifying assumption that each household is of the same size (although all methods may be extended to a population with a heterogeneous distribution of household sizes). For this households model we present efficient methods for studying several quantities of epidemiological interest: (i) the threshold for invasion; (ii) the early growth rate; (iii) the household offspring distribution; (iv) the endemic prevalence of infection; and (v) the transient dynamics of the process. We utilize these methods to explore a wide region of parameter space appropriate for human infectious diseases. We then extend these results to consider the effects of more realistic gamma-distributed infectious periods. We discuss how all these results differ from standard homogeneous-mixing models and assess the implications for the invasion, transmission and persistence of infection. The computational efficiency of the methodology presented here will hopefully aid in the parameterisation of structured models and in the evaluation of appropriate responses for future disease outbreaks.
Contingency planning for a deliberate release of smallpox in Great Britain - the role of geographical scale and contact structure
Thomas House, Ian Hall, Leon Danon, Matt J Keeling
BMC Infectious Diseases , 2010, DOI: 10.1186/1471-2334-10-25
Abstract: Here we develop a novel mathematical model for smallpox that incorporates both information on individual contact structure (which is important if the effects of contact tracing are to be captured accurately) and large-scale patterns of movement across a range of spatial scales in Great Britain.Analysis of this model confirms previous work suggesting that a locally targeted 'ring' vaccination strategy is optimal, and that this conclusion is actually quite robust for different socio-demographic and epidemiological assumptions.Our method allows for intuitive understanding of the reasons why national mass vaccination is typically predicted to be suboptimal. As such, we present a general framework for fast calculation of expected outcomes during the attempted control of diverse emerging infections; this is particularly important given that parameters would need to be interactively estimated and modelled in any release scenario.Stopping transmission of the smallpox (variola) virus amongst the human population was one of the greatest public health triumphs of the twentieth century; and yet since the events of 11 September 2001 the possibility of its reemergence has been under increased study [1]. Effective contingency planning for such a scenario requires knowledge of the optimal deployment and use of case isolation, contact tracing and vaccination. Since a series of controlled experiments to inform such decisions is not possible, we are forced to rely on mathematical modelling to improve the evidence base for emergency preparedness and response. Recent simulation models [2-5] typically conclude that, provided a given smallpox outbreak can be well controlled, the emphasis should be on case isolation, contact tracing and targeted vaccination rather than immediate country-level mass vaccination, due to the frequency of adverse effects from vaccine and the likely high efficacy of other measures. Targeting of vaccination can either be exclusively towards suspected cases found
The Nosoi commute: a spatial perspective on the rise of BSL-4 laboratories in cities
Thomas P. Van Boeckel,Michael J. Tildesley,Catherine Linard,José Halloy,Matt J. Keeling,Marius Gilbert
Quantitative Biology , 2013,
Abstract: Recent H5N1 influenza research has revived the debate on the storage and manipulation of potentially harmful pathogens. In the last two decades, new high biosafety (BSL-4) laboratories entered into operation, raising strong concerns from the public. The probability of an accidental release of a pathogen from a BSL-4 laboratory is extremely low, but the corresponding risk -- defined as the probability of occurrence multiplied by its impact -- could be significant depending on the pathogen specificities and the population potentially affected. A list of BSL-4 laboratories throughout the world, with their location and date of first activity, was established from publicly available sources. This database was used to estimate the total population living within a daily commuting distance of BSL-4 laboratories, and to quantify how this figure changed over time. We show that from 1990 to present, the population living within the commuting belt of BSL-4 laboratories increased by a factor of 4 to reach up to 1.8% of the world population, owing to an increase in the number of facilities and their installation in cities. Europe is currently hosting the largest population living in the direct vicinity of BSL-4 laboratories, while the recent building of new facilities in Asia suggests that an important increase of the population living close to BSL-4 laboratories will be observed in the next decades. We discuss the potential implications in term of global risk, and call for better pathogen-specific quantitative assessment of the risk of outbreaks resulting from the accidental release of potentially pandemic pathogens
Networks and the Epidemiology of Infectious Disease
Leon Danon,Ashley P. Ford,Thomas House,Chris P. Jewell,Matt J. Keeling,Gareth O. Roberts,Joshua V. Ross,Matthew C. Vernon
Interdisciplinary Perspectives on Infectious Diseases , 2011, DOI: 10.1155/2011/284909
Abstract: The science of networks has revolutionised research into the dynamics of interacting elements. It could be argued that epidemiology in particular has embraced the potential of network theory more than any other discipline. Here we review the growing body of research concerning the spread of infectious diseases on networks, focusing on the interplay between network theory and epidemiology. The review is split into four main sections, which examine: the types of network relevant to epidemiology; the multitude of ways these networks can be characterised; the statistical methods that can be applied to infer the epidemiological parameters on a realised network; and finally simulation and analytical methods to determine epidemic dynamics on a given network. Given the breadth of areas covered and the ever-expanding number of publications, a comprehensive review of all work is impossible. Instead, we provide a personalised overview into the areas of network epidemiology that have seen the greatest progress in recent years or have the greatest potential to provide novel insights. As such, considerable importance is placed on analytical approaches and statistical methods which are both rapidly expanding fields. Throughout this review we restrict our attention to epidemiological issues. 1. Introduction The science of networks has revolutionised research into the dynamics of interacting elements. The associated techniques have had a huge impact in a range of fields, from computer science to neurology, from social science to statistical physics. However, it could be argued that epidemiology has embraced the potential of network theory more than any other discipline. There is an extremely close relationship between epidemiology and network theory that dates back to the mid-1980s [1, 2]. This is because the connections between individuals (or groups of individuals) that allow an infectious disease to propagate naturally define a network, while the network that is generated provides insights into the epidemiological dynamics. In particular, an understanding of the structure of the transmission network allows us to improve predictions of the likely distribution of infection and the early growth of infection (following invasion), as well as allowing the simulation of the full dynamics. However the interplay between networks and epidemiology goes further; because the network defines potential transmission routes, knowledge of its structure can be used as part of disease control. For example, contact tracing aims to identify likely transmission network connections from
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